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United States Treaties Ussr

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NEWS
March 24, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials, assessing the prospects for curbing strategic arms agreements, expressed increasing confidence Wednesday that President Reagan's controversial Strategic Defense Initiative will not be an obstacle to a major agreement aimed at cutting long-range offensive weapons in half. As the latest high-level U.S.-Soviet talks ended, Secretary of State George P.
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NEWS
December 15, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the danger of "internal" arms races within the splintered Soviet Union, U.S. officials are warning that key republics may begin squabbling over how to divide up thousands of tanks and other conventional weapons covered by a recent U.S.-Soviet treaty.
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NEWS
June 9, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Four and a half years after the first American medium-range missiles arrived at this sprawling air base amid violent protest and political nervousness, U.S. military officials are preparing to remove them. The first important step in the process could come as early as next month, with the arrival of Soviet inspection teams. Under the terms of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty completed June 1 in Moscow, which calls for the elimination of all U.S.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States agreed Tuesday to accept limits on space-based missile defenses in a bid to win Soviet approval of a proposed system designed to provide protection against a limited ballistic missile attack. The change of position, adopted by U.S. arms control negotiators in Geneva, was prepared before the unexpected agreement by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to consider amending a 1972 arms treaty whose terms until now have been considered sacrosanct by the Soviets.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | JACK NELSON and ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Staff Writers
All six Democratic presidential candidates, seeking to dramatize their own unity and GOP divisions during a nationally televised debate Tuesday night, unanimously endorsed the proposed intermediate nuclear arms treaty and expressed dismay that only Vice President George Bush among the Republicans supports it. "It is nothing short of appalling," declared Sen. Albert Gore Jr. (D-Tenn.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan announced Friday that he and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet in Washington starting Dec. 7 for summit talks that the President said could turn the anniversary of the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor into a day remembered as the beginning of superpower peace. Standing between Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan announced Friday that he will meet with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the United States this fall to sign a treaty outlawing medium-range nuclear missiles, although he said he retains strong doubts about dealing with the nation he once called an "evil empire." No specific date for the summit was announced, but officials said it probably will take place in the second half of November.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
With strong Administration assurances that potential loopholes have been eliminated, Senate leaders agreed Monday night to begin final debate on the U.S.-Soviet treaty banning land-based intermediate-range nuclear weapons. "I am satisfied, and I want to proceed," Senate Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) said Monday night after receiving written recommendations from the Foreign Relations, Armed Services and Intelligence committees to go ahead.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate cleared the decks Thursday for ratification of the historic treaty banning medium-range missiles, making a strong assertion that its interpretation of the agreement is permanently binding. After hours of intense behind-the-scenes negotiations and a sharp floor debate, a compromise pushed by Democrats settled a partisan dispute that had simmered since the treaty was signed at the meeting between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev here last December.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Six-and-a-half years after negotiations began, the Senate approved the landmark Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty with the Soviet Union on Friday, marking history's first cutback in offensive nuclear weapons. After systematically rejecting a last flurry of amendments, a huge bipartisan majority voted 93 to 5 to approve the treaty.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stunned by the ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, members of Congress said Monday that they are likely to resist any efforts by President Bush to win their approval of U.S-Soviet trade and arms reduction agreements. Some members of Congress also suggested that the coup could cause them to reconsider Bush's requests for cuts in defense spending.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | Associated Press
The Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty will not require the United States and Soviet Union to halt research on new weapons. Research continues in both countries on making fewer weapons that scientists say are more powerful and more difficult to detect. Among them: Earth-Penetrating Weapon: Nuclear warheads dropped from planes or loaded onto missiles would burrow into the ground and explode.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years of tough negotiation and a dramatic signing ceremony Wednesday in Moscow, the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty faces a final pair of obstacles--ratification by the U.S. Senate here and the Supreme Soviet in Moscow. While hard-liners in both capitals are expected to attack the START accord, experts said that in Washington, at least, opposition is likely to be more noisy than it is effective. In the Senate, only one lawmaker--Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
The developments: President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a historic arms control treaty and launched a joint move to prod Israel into attending a Middle East peace conference. But the two continued to disagree over the next steps to take on arms control. Cooperation on the Middle East is an example of the new partnership between the superpowers, which Bush has been trying to foster. But initial Israeli comments on the U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a historic and long-awaited treaty cutting their nations' nuclear arsenals Wednesday, but they neared the end of their two-day summit meeting here still far apart on the future of arms control. With the new treaty, the two countries "reverse a half-century of steadily growing strategic arsenals," Bush said. "More than that, we take a significant step forward in dispelling a half-century of mistrust."
BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | From Reuters
President Bush's offer to lower tariffs on Soviet goods could help bring the Soviet Union into the mainstream of global trade but is unlikely to generate a flood of Soviet exports to the United States. The widely expected trade concession, part of a broad new trade agreement, gives the Soviets trade terms already granted most other U.S. trading partners. The Most Favored Nation status means U.S. tariffs on Soviet exports will fall to as low as 5% from 50%.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Senate leaders moved to end the laborious debate on the medium-range missile treaty Tuesday, filing a procedural petition that could produce a final vote in time for the pact to be sealed by President Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev at the Moscow summit meeting.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday resoundingly endorsed the landmark U.S.-Soviet treaty outlawing ground-launched medium-range nuclear weapons and sent it to the Senate floor, where supporters expect to see it approved before the upcoming summit meeting between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JACK NELSON and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The prospect of an unprecedented joint U.S.-Soviet peace mission to the Middle East was raised by Kremlin officials Monday as President Bush arrived here for a two-day summit meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, declaring that "I think the time is right" for a Mideast peace conference, suggested that he and Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We may be arriving at the end of an era of easy arms control," a Bush Administration official mused last week, contemplating the completion of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. "The kind of arms control we'll be looking at from now on is going to seem hard by comparison." Negotiating START wasn't easy, of course--the 750-page agreement took nine years, two U.S. Presidents and four Soviet leaders to achieve.
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