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April 2, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. diplomats and officials are alarmed by the sometimes acrimonious and often exasperated feelings that have marred relations between Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali and the Clinton Administration in recent months. The troubles surfaced at the end of February, when the press attache for U.N.
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NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States warned a U.N. meeting on small-arms trafficking that it is prepared to do battle to defend the rights of arms makers and legal gun owners--even when the guns they want to own are specifically designed for war. John R. Bolton, undersecretary of State for arms control, fired off the warning on the opening day of a conference aimed at clamping down on the $1-billion global small-arms trade, which the U.N. blames for half a million deaths a year. Bolton said the U.S.
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NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration admitted Friday that the United States had lost its seat on the U.N. Human Rights Commission this week after receiving "solid, written assurances" of support from 43 countries in advance--only to get just 29 votes during the secret ballot. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said he was astonished and disappointed at the outcome, ending more than half a century in which the United States was the moral anchor of a group co-founded by former U.N.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The appointment of highly regarded diplomat Richard C. Holbrooke as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations has been stalled by an investigation of his financial affairs, White House officials said Friday.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) won unanimous confirmation from the Senate to become U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. The Senate voted 100-0 to give Richardson the post vacated by new Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. Approval of Richardson, who will resign from Congress, was never in doubt. But there is less support for Clinton administration proposals to pay more than $1 billion in U.S. back dues to the United Nations.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In a blow to Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the president of Africa's regional association is urging Africans to submit candidates for the top U.N. job because of U.S. opposition to the Egyptian incumbent. The move by President Paul Biya of Cameroon, chairman of the Organization of African Unity, appeared to break a deadlock following the Nov. 19 veto of Boutros-Ghali by the United States.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States intends to go to the United Nations this month for authority to use force in the Persian Gulf if Secretary of State James A. Baker III gets favorable reactions from U.N. Security Council members in consultations over the next few days, a senior U.S. official traveling with Baker said Thursday. The official's comments, made on the condition he not be identified, went further than ever before in confirming the Bush Administration's strategy to seek such a U.N.
NEWS
September 21, 1987
U.S. ambassadors to the United Nations are living in $7,500-a-month apartments, illegally commuting to work in chauffeur-driven cars and buying $125 meals--all at taxpayers' expense, an internal State Department report said. The report, prepared by the Office of Policy and Program Review, is the latest salvo in a years-long debate and sharply criticizes senior State Department officials for sloppy management of funds for mission employees' housing, transportation and entertainment.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration admitted Friday that the United States had lost its seat on the U.N. Human Rights Commission this week after receiving "solid, written assurances" of support from 43 countries in advance--only to get just 29 votes during the secret ballot. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said he was astonished and disappointed at the outcome, ending more than half a century in which the United States was the moral anchor of a group co-founded by former U.N.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
NEWS
November 7, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days when Richard Holbrooke doesn't show up for U.N. Security Council votes are the times that he thinks he is doing his job best. The U.S. ambassador to the world body spends those days--one or two a week--in Washington, trying to persuade members of Congress to put the United States' money where its mouth is. The U.S. will lose its seat in the 188-member General Assembly if it doesn't begin to pay its mounting debt to the world body by the end of the year.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration on Thursday stood firmly behind career diplomat Richard C. Holbrooke and his stalled nomination as ambassador to the United Nations, despite new charges that he violated federal conflict-of-interest laws in his private business dealings. President Clinton, calling Holbrooke "a man of tremendous intellect and character," affirmed he "is standing behind Ambassador Holbrooke lock, stock and barrel," said National Security Council spokesman David Leavy.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The appointment of highly regarded diplomat Richard C. Holbrooke as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations has been stalled by an investigation of his financial affairs, White House officials said Friday.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) won unanimous confirmation from the Senate to become U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. The Senate voted 100-0 to give Richardson the post vacated by new Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. Approval of Richardson, who will resign from Congress, was never in doubt. But there is less support for Clinton administration proposals to pay more than $1 billion in U.S. back dues to the United Nations.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In a blow to Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the president of Africa's regional association is urging Africans to submit candidates for the top U.N. job because of U.S. opposition to the Egyptian incumbent. The move by President Paul Biya of Cameroon, chairman of the Organization of African Unity, appeared to break a deadlock following the Nov. 19 veto of Boutros-Ghali by the United States.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States warned a U.N. meeting on small-arms trafficking that it is prepared to do battle to defend the rights of arms makers and legal gun owners--even when the guns they want to own are specifically designed for war. John R. Bolton, undersecretary of State for arms control, fired off the warning on the opening day of a conference aimed at clamping down on the $1-billion global small-arms trade, which the U.N. blames for half a million deaths a year. Bolton said the U.S.
NEWS
November 7, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days when Richard Holbrooke doesn't show up for U.N. Security Council votes are the times that he thinks he is doing his job best. The U.S. ambassador to the world body spends those days--one or two a week--in Washington, trying to persuade members of Congress to put the United States' money where its mouth is. The U.S. will lose its seat in the 188-member General Assembly if it doesn't begin to pay its mounting debt to the world body by the end of the year.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. diplomats and officials are alarmed by the sometimes acrimonious and often exasperated feelings that have marred relations between Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali and the Clinton Administration in recent months. The troubles surfaced at the end of February, when the press attache for U.N.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States intends to go to the United Nations this month for authority to use force in the Persian Gulf if Secretary of State James A. Baker III gets favorable reactions from U.N. Security Council members in consultations over the next few days, a senior U.S. official traveling with Baker said Thursday. The official's comments, made on the condition he not be identified, went further than ever before in confirming the Bush Administration's strategy to seek such a U.N.
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