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United States Wages And Salaries

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BUSINESS
March 30, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Congress is nearing a classic showdown between liberals and conservatives over a bill to raise the federal minimum wage, unchanged at $3.35 an hour for more than seven years, to $5.05 by the beginning of 1992. The confrontation will occur 50 years after President Franklin D. Roosevelt won a long struggle to enact a 25-cent-an-hour minimum as one of the pillars of his New Deal plan to pull the nation out of the Great Depression.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 2000 | From Reuters
The pay and benefits of U.S. workers rose modestly in the third quarter of the year, the government said Thursday in a report likely to comfort the inflation-wary Federal Reserve. The Labor Department said its closely watched employment cost index, a broad measure of what employers pay in wages, salaries and benefits, rose 0.9% for the three months ending in September, marginally below the 1.0% increase forecast by economists in a Reuters poll.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Christina Brandt was delighted to finally get a job offer after more than five months out of work, though she was somewhat disappointed in the salary. "I had wanted about $7,000 more a year," said the 33-year-old former bank assistant vice president, one of thousands of bank employees laid off during the recession.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2000 | From Reuters
America's longest economic expansion has failed to benefit all workers, as poverty levels among full-time employees have changed little since the early 1970s, a study made public Thursday found. In groundbreaking research that examined poverty among full-time workers, the New York-based Conference Board found that since 1973, even as the work force has expanded, a growing proportion of employees has been touched by poverty.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991
? Will economy turn around? Don't try to forecast the economic outlook for 1991 before Jan. 15. The United Nations' deadline for Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait has also become a deadline of a sort for the United States. The question of war or peace is now the major variable facing economic forecasters as they attempt to put together their predictions for the next year. If America goes to war, oil prices and inflation will likely soar, at least until the Iraqis are forced out of Kuwait.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Brisk economic growth in 1998 pushed up Americans' wages and benefits by 3.4%, the fastest growth in five years and a slight improvement over 1997. The gain reported Thursday by the Labor Department in its employment cost index marked the third consecutive year of improvement. Wages and benefits rose 3.3% in 1997, 2.9% in 1996 and 2.7% in 1995. At the same time, inflation has been decreasing, so workers' purchasing power has shown significant gains.
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jobs grew at an unexpectedly gentle rate during August while wages rose moderately, news that triggered sharp rallies Friday in stock and bond markets in the hope that a possible slowdown will hold inflation in check. The Labor Department said the economy spun off only 124,000 new jobs in August, the smallest increase since May but still enough to push the unemployment rate down a notch to 4.2%. Non-farm workers' hourly earnings rose only 0.2% to $13.30, up 2 cents from July.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2000 | From Reuters
America's longest economic expansion has failed to benefit all workers, as poverty levels among full-time employees have changed little since the early 1970s, a study made public Thursday found. In groundbreaking research that examined poverty among full-time workers, the New York-based Conference Board found that since 1973, even as the work force has expanded, a growing proportion of employees has been touched by poverty.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
American workers' pay and benefits edged higher last year, the government said Tuesday, but the increases were well within the comfort zones of inflation-wary investors on Wall Street. Total compensation, as measured by the Labor Department's employment cost index, rose 2.9% last year, up from 2.7% in 1995, but less than the 3% gain of 1994. In the fourth quarter, compensation rose by 0.8%, the department said, up from the 0.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a compromise, key House and Senate negotiators agreed Wednesday on a bill that would raise the minimum wage while also providing $9 billion in tax breaks for small businesses, allowing homemakers to establish tax-sheltered individual retirement accounts and offering a $5,000 tax credit for adoption expenses. The agreement clears the way for Congress to enact a two-stage, 90-cent-an-hour increase in the minimum wage before lawmakers leave for a monthlong summer recess at the end of the week.
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jobs grew at an unexpectedly gentle rate during August while wages rose moderately, news that triggered sharp rallies Friday in stock and bond markets in the hope that a possible slowdown will hold inflation in check. The Labor Department said the economy spun off only 124,000 new jobs in August, the smallest increase since May but still enough to push the unemployment rate down a notch to 4.2%. Non-farm workers' hourly earnings rose only 0.2% to $13.30, up 2 cents from July.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wages and benefits of American workers so far this year have risen at their slowest pace in almost two decades, clouding what had been some of the brightest news about the current boom--its recent success at improving the lots of a broad swath of working people. The government said its employment cost index, Washington's most reliable measure of what employers are paying in wages, salaries and benefits, rose a mere 0.4% in the first three months of the year.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Brisk economic growth in 1998 pushed up Americans' wages and benefits by 3.4%, the fastest growth in five years and a slight improvement over 1997. The gain reported Thursday by the Labor Department in its employment cost index marked the third consecutive year of improvement. Wages and benefits rose 3.3% in 1997, 2.9% in 1996 and 2.7% in 1995. At the same time, inflation has been decreasing, so workers' purchasing power has shown significant gains.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1998 | From Reuters
Americans enjoyed solid pay gains this spring that allowed them to buy new homes at a record rate in June, the government said Thursday in reports that reflected an underlying strength in the U.S. economy and gave the stock market a boost. Pay and fringe benefits for workers rose 0.9% in the second quarter, the Labor Department said in its employment cost index measure of employee compensation. That followed a 0.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1998 | JOHN M. BERRY, WASHINGTON POST
American workers' wages and benefits rose 3.5% in the year ended last month, the largest gain since 1993, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Until the beginning of last year, compensation had remained fairly flat during an otherwise broad expansion of the economy. The rise in compensation is now accelerating--especially for workers in industries such as financial services and business consulting.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1997 | From Reuters
Many Americans are working longer hours with little to show for it, a new analysis by two economists reveals. "Most Americans are not working harder so they can afford a fancier minivan," said Barry Bluestone and Stephen Rose. "They're just trying to make payments on their old car or cover the rent." "It turns out that the enormous increase in work effort over the past 20 years has allowed families to maintain their old standard of living--but almost nothing more," they said.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Americans' incomes and spending both posted healthy increases in November, but even with that good send-off for the Christmas sales season, actual results appear to be falling short of retailers' hopes. The Commerce Department reported Monday that personal incomes rose 0.5% last month, a solid rebound after showing no gain in October, while consumer spending was also up 0.5%. The spending increase followed a 0.7% rise in October.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton recently proposed that companies offer paid "flex" time to nonexempt workers in lieu of overtime pay, he dived into a raging nationwide debate that could lead to dramatic changes in the nation's Depression-era work laws. The federal law, devised when Congress was scrambling to find ways to get people back to work and protect them from workplace abuses, has been changed only grudgingly since the 1930s.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
American workers' pay and benefits edged higher last year, the government said Tuesday, but the increases were well within the comfort zones of inflation-wary investors on Wall Street. Total compensation, as measured by the Labor Department's employment cost index, rose 2.9% last year, up from 2.7% in 1995, but less than the 3% gain of 1994. In the fourth quarter, compensation rose by 0.8%, the department said, up from the 0.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Americans' incomes and spending both posted healthy increases in November, but even with that good send-off for the Christmas sales season, actual results appear to be falling short of retailers' hopes. The Commerce Department reported Monday that personal incomes rose 0.5% last month, a solid rebound after showing no gain in October, while consumer spending was also up 0.5%. The spending increase followed a 0.7% rise in October.
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