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United States Welfare Reform

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April 1, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate skidded to a bitterly partisan halt Friday, its debate over spending cuts ensnared in a complicated political imbroglio involving aid to the poor, assistance for the Mexican economy, defense spending and tax loopholes for the rich. Fearing that the standoff could hurt his bid for the 1996 GOP presidential nomination, Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) lashed out at Democrats for opposing the spending cuts and recessed the Senate so he could go to New Hampshire to campaign.
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NEWS
April 1, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate skidded to a bitterly partisan halt Friday, its debate over spending cuts ensnared in a complicated political imbroglio involving aid to the poor, assistance for the Mexican economy, defense spending and tax loopholes for the rich. Fearing that the standoff could hurt his bid for the 1996 GOP presidential nomination, Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) lashed out at Democrats for opposing the spending cuts and recessed the Senate so he could go to New Hampshire to campaign.
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NEWS
August 2, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The momentous welfare overhaul that won final congressional approval Thursday may "end welfare as we know it," but even its Republican congressional sponsors warned that it will not end the deep poverty in the blighted neighborhoods of the nation's cities or rural areas. The bill's Republican patrons expressed sober warnings about how much more federal, state and local governments must do to begin to address the worst problems of poverty in America.
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Clinton administration proposed closing gaps in medical and food stamp benefits for legal immigrants--gaps opened by the overhaul of welfare three years ago--advocates braced for Republican opposition. After all, what Vice President Al Gore proposed in a speech in San Francisco last month went beyond Clinton's promise when he signed the welfare bill in 1996 to restore benefits to legal immigrants living in the United States before the bill became law.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Upholding a universal truth of politics, there was more action inside the bar than in the main hall for most of the day at this month's Labor Party annual conference in Scotland. The drink was Calder's Dark and Smooth, Tetley Bitter and Guinness in deep dark pints as thick and opaque as the rainswept sky.
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