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SPORTS
June 25, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
EDINA, Minn. When Dieter Esch began looking at the players on the LPGA Tour, he quickly figured out that something was missing. He sensed they always appeared out of place . . . swinging nine-irons, hitting out of bunkers, putting cross-handed on the green. So Esch decided it would be a great idea to put the golfers in something different, something the casual public does not see them in, at least up to now. Like bikinis. Like lingerie. Like evening gowns.
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SPORTS
July 13, 2009 | Mark Wogenrich
Mickey Mouse was listening to Eminem on her iPod as she warmed up on the practice putting green Sunday morning. Candie Kung walked by and made note of the familiar scene. "Did you sleep here last night?" Kung asked. Eun Hee Ji (a.k.a. Mickey Mouse) said, no, she didn't spend that much time on the green, but seemed always to run into Kung for some reason. Kung was at the practice green again later, waiting as Ji made the definitive putt of the women's golf season.
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SPORTS
June 29, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
EDINA, Minn. -- Four years ago, the player who is leading the U.S. Women's Open wasn't sure whether her golf career was going to even happen. Back surgery for scoliosis can make a person wonder about a lot, but 23-year-old Stacy Lewis is answering all the questions so far.
SPORTS
July 10, 2009 | Associated Press
There's no denying this is the biggest week in women's golf -- full of good news and bad. The game's top-ranked player, a former champion and a developmental tour qualifier are one stroke behind a talented second-year LPGA player at the U.S. Women's Open, on a course that doesn't yield birdies easily.
SPORTS
May 24, 2001 | Thomas Bonk
The top five choices to win next week's U.S. Women's Open: 1. Annika Sorenstam (Why not? She's winning everything else.) 2. Se Ri Pak (Ranks in top five in greens in regulation and scoring average.) 3. Grace Park (Tied for eighth and tied for sixth in last two Opens.) 4. Dottie Pepper (Ranks second in putting stats.) 5. Karrie Webb (You have to like anyone who thought "Survivor" was phony.)
SPORTS
June 24, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
When she looked down the first fairway, Annika Sorenstam was jumpy, but at least it was a familiar feeling, the same nervous flutter she felt two years ago as she stood on the first tee at the PGA Tour's Colonial tournament. There was still one difference. "I could breathe today," she said. Here's another one: Sorenstam hit it down the middle of the fairway on the first hole at Colonial, but Thursday at Cherry Hills Country Club, she drove it into the right rough to start the U.S. Women's Open.
SPORTS
June 26, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
So exactly when did the U.S. Women's Open turn into Amateur Hour? While Annika Sorenstam spent Saturday preparing her concession speech in her run for her third major title of the year, two teenage amateurs, 15-year-old Michelle Wie and 17-year-old Morgan Pressel, share the lead after three rounds with Karen Stupples. Also in the mix is 18-year-old Paula Creamer, who is one shot behind, which means this group of contenders is so young, maybe they should just settle it with a pillow fight.
SPORTS
June 29, 2006 | Tommy Hine, Hartford Courant
She's the best female golfer since Patty Berg. Maybe the best ever. But Annika Sorenstam hasn't won a U.S. Women's Open in 10 years. "After winning in '96, the first few years after that, I put a lot of pressure on myself," said Sorenstam, who begins play in the Open today at Newport Country Club. "I felt like I came out, won two in a row and thought, 'Wow. I've got this. It's a great championship.' "I came out and expected the same thing, and it never happened. I felt like I beat up on myself.
SPORTS
July 8, 2002 | From Associated Press
Juli Inkster whipped the Kansas crowd into a frenzy at every turn Sunday in the U.S. Women's Open, the cheers becoming more deafening with every crucial putt she made. When the greatest round in her Hall of Fame career was over and her second Open title was all but assured, she jogged up the hill next to the 18th green, slapping hands with a gallery that was crowding around her.
SPORTS
July 6, 2002 | From Associated Press
After a tearful farewell from Nancy Lopez and a shocking departure by Karrie Webb, the U.S. Women's Open shifted into survival mode Friday. To no one's surprise, Annika Sorenstam handled it better than anyone. Sorenstam was the only player to break par on a hot, blustery afternoon at Prairie Dunes in Hutchinson, Kan., shooting a one-under 69 that gave her a share of the lead with Juli Inkster and Laura Diaz. Sorenstam surged to the top with three birdies on her final six holes.
SPORTS
June 30, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
EDINA, Minn. -- The youngest U.S. Women's Open winner in history introduced herself to the record books and a largely unknowing public as the tournament's 63rd champion Sunday, when Inbee Park walked softly over Interlachen Country Club to claim her first victory and her first major title. Only 19, and inspired to take up golf by fellow South Korean Se Ri Pak's landmark U.S. Open victory in 1998, Park broke out of a pack of Parks -- she was one of six who played here -- and won easily.
SPORTS
June 29, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
EDINA, Minn. -- Four years ago, the player who is leading the U.S. Women's Open wasn't sure whether her golf career was going to even happen. Back surgery for scoliosis can make a person wonder about a lot, but 23-year-old Stacy Lewis is answering all the questions so far.
SPORTS
June 25, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
EDINA, Minn. When Dieter Esch began looking at the players on the LPGA Tour, he quickly figured out that something was missing. He sensed they always appeared out of place . . . swinging nine-irons, hitting out of bunkers, putting cross-handed on the green. So Esch decided it would be a great idea to put the golfers in something different, something the casual public does not see them in, at least up to now. Like bikinis. Like lingerie. Like evening gowns.
SPORTS
June 29, 2006 | Tommy Hine, Hartford Courant
She's the best female golfer since Patty Berg. Maybe the best ever. But Annika Sorenstam hasn't won a U.S. Women's Open in 10 years. "After winning in '96, the first few years after that, I put a lot of pressure on myself," said Sorenstam, who begins play in the Open today at Newport Country Club. "I felt like I came out, won two in a row and thought, 'Wow. I've got this. It's a great championship.' "I came out and expected the same thing, and it never happened. I felt like I beat up on myself.
SPORTS
June 27, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Now we know why she's called Birdie. There were 63 players who played the 18th hole Sunday, but there was only one birdie all day and it was made by 23-year-old Birdie Kim, who holed out a 30-yard bunker shot to win the U.S. Women's Open on her first try.
SPORTS
June 26, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
So exactly when did the U.S. Women's Open turn into Amateur Hour? While Annika Sorenstam spent Saturday preparing her concession speech in her run for her third major title of the year, two teenage amateurs, 15-year-old Michelle Wie and 17-year-old Morgan Pressel, share the lead after three rounds with Karen Stupples. Also in the mix is 18-year-old Paula Creamer, who is one shot behind, which means this group of contenders is so young, maybe they should just settle it with a pillow fight.
SPORTS
July 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
A shrinking list of challengers all made costly bogeys on the 18th hole, allowing Annika Sorenstam to get out of the sweltering sun with a two-stroke lead Saturday in the U.S. Women's Open at Hutchinson, Kan. She says the tournament is far from over. It sure doesn't look that way.
SPORTS
July 6, 2003 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Annika Sorenstam woke up with a sore throat Saturday morning and figured it was a good sign. "Look out for the sick golfer," she said. "And that's me." Look out, indeed. Sorenstam, the No. 1 women's player in the world, shot four-under-par 67 -- the best round of the third day at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club -- and stormed into contention with one round to play in the U.S. Women's Open. She has a three-day total of two-under 211, three shots behind leader Hilary Lunke and two behind Angela Stanford.
SPORTS
June 24, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
When she looked down the first fairway, Annika Sorenstam was jumpy, but at least it was a familiar feeling, the same nervous flutter she felt two years ago as she stood on the first tee at the PGA Tour's Colonial tournament. There was still one difference. "I could breathe today," she said. Here's another one: Sorenstam hit it down the middle of the fairway on the first hole at Colonial, but Thursday at Cherry Hills Country Club, she drove it into the right rough to start the U.S. Women's Open.
SPORTS
July 6, 2003 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Annika Sorenstam woke up with a sore throat Saturday morning and figured it was a good sign. "Look out for the sick golfer," she said. "And that's me." Look out, indeed. Sorenstam, the No. 1 women's player in the world, shot four-under-par 67 -- the best round of the third day at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club -- and stormed into contention with one round to play in the U.S. Women's Open. She has a three-day total of two-under 211, three shots behind leader Hilary Lunke and two behind Angela Stanford.
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