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NEWS
July 27, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's three largest industrial unions--representing about 2 million auto workers, steelworkers and machinists--are expected to propose a merger of their memberships today in Washington. The merger would join the United Auto Workers, United Steelworkers of America and the International Assn. of Machinists & Aerospace Workers and create the nation's largest union with vast financial and political clout.
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NEWS
July 27, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's three largest industrial unions--representing about 2 million auto workers, steelworkers and machinists--are expected to propose a merger of their memberships today in Washington. The merger would join the United Auto Workers, United Steelworkers of America and the International Assn. of Machinists & Aerospace Workers and create the nation's largest union with vast financial and political clout.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 2001 | Bloomberg News
LTV Corp., the second-biggest U.S. steelmaker, reached a tentative agreement with the steelworkers union and a creditors' committee to avert a shutdown today of the company's steel plant in Cleveland. LTV and the United Steel Workers of America reached the agreement with a committee of unsecured creditors involved in the company's Chapter 11 bankruptcy case, the union and committee said in separate news releases Friday.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991 | From Reuters
Barring an unforeseen breakthrough, the United Steel Workers of America is expected to go on strike against USX Corp., the nation's biggest steel company, when its labor contract expires Thursday, industry experts say. Union and USX officials declined to comment on bargaining talks because of a news blackout. But industry sources said the two sides are far apart and preparing for a strike.
NEWS
November 24, 1986
Presidents of union locals from around the country called for solidarity with meatpackers who lost jobs during a strike and accused top labor leadership of cooperating with management to force concessions. About 250 workers at a rally in Boston's Faneuil Hall cheered speakers who called for action against the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union leadership, which they said permitted deteriorating wages and benefits.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | Associated Press
The International Trade Commission imposed duties of as much as 95.29% on Japanese exports of tin plate, the kind of steel used to make aerosol, food and beer cans. The punitive duty represents the amount the Commerce Department determined was the difference between the price Japanese exporters were charging customers in the United States and the price they were charging in Japan for the same type of steel. The Japanese steel industry expressed bewilderment that the ITC, a U.S.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2000 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that sales of Firestone tires are declining, Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. said Tuesday it will shut down three of its U.S. tire factories temporarily and lay off 450 workers at one plant to cut back on an oversupply of tires that are not part of the massive recall launched two months ago. The tire maker's announcement came the same day that federal regulators said they have received reports of 18 additional deaths linked to accidents involving the recalled Firestone tires.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The labor dispute playing havoc with West Coast docks has never been about pay or benefits. What's at stake in the battle between shipping lines and dockworkers is who will control port operations from San Diego to Seattle and, in the long run, the fate of one of the last powerful unions in America. For four months, the titans have been wrestling over questions that, when viewed individually, may seem insignificant, even petty.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1986 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
Contributions and pledges to Hands Across America have topped $41 million, organizers said Thursday, while a review of expenses shows that costs are down considerably from earlier estimates. The new figures, organizers said, suggest that their early goal of raising $50 million to aid hungry and homeless Americans may be within reach, and Hands officials have started preparing to distribute funds to selected aid groups beginning this fall.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, there seems scant possibility for subtlety in metal food cans. * "You buy steel. You bend it. You weld it," is how PaineWebber analyst George Staphos sums up this $4-billion-per-year industry. Three flat pieces of metal, a big machine and you're there. And the market is about as exciting as tomato paste--it chugs along year after year on a drearily predictable stream of creamed corn and cat food. Then came Silgan Containers Corp.
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