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November 29, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
The water is deeper than it looks. On the surface, soccer in the United States appears a shallow pond. Glimmering at the top are the U.S. national teams, with Coach Tony DiCicco's Olympic gold medalist women's team the brightest of them all. Just beneath that comes Major League Soccer, soon to head into its fourth season but still working to establish a true identity.
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SPORTS
November 29, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
The water is deeper than it looks. On the surface, soccer in the United States appears a shallow pond. Glimmering at the top are the U.S. national teams, with Coach Tony DiCicco's Olympic gold medalist women's team the brightest of them all. Just beneath that comes Major League Soccer, soon to head into its fourth season but still working to establish a true identity.
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SPORTS
March 16, 1997 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Saturday night was any indication, the Zodiac and its fans are in for an exciting season. In front of a crowd of 4,359 at Santa Ana Stadium, Orange County's newest professional soccer team played to a 1-1 tie with the Galaxy in its debut exhibition game. The Zodiac, the A-League affiliate of the Major League Soccer Galaxy, fell behind, 1-0, in the first half, then tied it in the 90th minute on a goal by Gustavo Leal.
SPORTS
April 19, 1997 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't expect the Orange County Zodiac to win the A-League soccer championship in its debut season. But based on the Zodiac's 9-2-1 record in exhibition games and scrimmages, the team should be competitive. If nothing else, the Zodiac should be fairly recognizable to most Southern Californian soccer fans. Every player on the 19-man roster has some Southern California ties. Seven grew up in Orange County, four are from Santa Ana.
SPORTS
September 29, 1997 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Next April, the National Soccer Alliance will become the United States' first women's professional soccer league. U.S. women's soccer is the best in the world, but the NSA has set its target so low that the league might be no more than a blip on the sporting radar, at least in its early years. But that will not stop it from trying. The NSA will attempt to prove Alan Rothenberg and the rest of U.S.
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