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NEWS
February 24, 1994
On Feb. 10 at 9:50 a.m., Washington Middle School teacher Pamela Altea cautioned two adults to leave the area adjacent to the Pasadena school. With a group of students watching, the adults viciously attacked Altea and beat her to a state of near senselessness. It appears that school board President George Van Alstine, Supt. Vera Vignes, district Police Chief Jarado J. Blue, Principal Karen Kommer and United Teachers of Pasadena President Frank Scoonover all agree that the beating was the teacher's fault because she did not lock a gate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Howard Blume
One candidate to head the Los Angeles teachers union was laid off. Another was removed from the classroom for alleged misconduct. A third lost his position when his school was restructured with new staff because of low test scores. A fourth is an elementary school counselor who must shuttle between two campuses. Ten candidates are vying to be the next president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest teachers union. Their misfortunes run the gamut of what can go wrong for teachers, especially in recent times.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1989
I read with amusement Superintendent of Schools Leonard Britton's letter ("Blaming the Los Angeles School Board for the Labor Woes of Teachers Is Unfair," Jan. 1) attacking Harry Bernstein's column, "L.A. School Board-Teacher Harmony Is a Possible Dream." Britton takes exception to Bernstein calling the pay docking of teachers' salaries a "retaliation" or "escalation" by the district in the contract negotiations, but that is in fact what it is. Britton also claims that United Teachers of Los Angeles' belligerence has hurt the trust level that is essential to resolving problems.
OPINION
March 12, 2013
One nasty election later, there is no sign that the divisiveness in the Los Angeles Unified School District will abate. If anything, it looks likely to increase, with activists in United Teachers Los Angeles announcing that teachers will vote on a passel of anti-reform positions. The resolution aims to fight the district's policy of reconstituting some of its lowest-performing schools by removing and replacing teachers, to minimize use of student test scores in teacher evaluations and to spend more money in the classrooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1985
Your editorial (May 27), endorsing the teacher union candidate, Elizabeth Ginsburg, shows a total lack of perspective relative to the function of the Los Angeles Board of Education. What budget and/or business knowledge does a high school history teacher possess? What payroll has candidate Ginsburg ever met? What has she done but remain in her lofty academic tower? The most highly qualified candidate who also has the most versatile background is Dr. David Armor. His teaching experience at both Harvard University and UCLA has given him the perspective to ascertain the educational needs of college students not met at their prior high school level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1985
Regarding Pamela Moreland's article (Sept. 5), "Teachers Plan Report Cards on Principals," I must say it's about time. Teachers should have been given the opportunity to rate their principals a long time ago. President Wayne Johnson of the United Teachers of Los Angeles is on the right track in creating an evaluation of principals by their teachers. It is an opportunity for all concerned, with the benefits reaching all segments of the school population. The process, if fairly administered, would hold principals accountable, and protect them as well.
NEWS
October 20, 1985 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
An outpouring of public sympathy for teachers during their three-week protest for higher pay was credited last week for settlement of a contract dispute between the Pasadena Unified School District and United Teachers of Pasadena. Both district and union spokesmen said pay hikes of 10% to 15% are the result of the public response when teachers picketed and boycotted back-to-school nights at which parents were invited to meet the teachers. Board of Education President Kathryn T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988
I would like to point out some areas in which Solmon and I agree and differ. I fully agree that Supt. Britton's salary is justified. In fact, I believe he is underpaid. Anyone directly responsible for an organization of 57,000 employees deserves more money. There are executives at Disney and MCA who are paid millions, yet those companies have a quarter of the number of employees that LAUSD does. Solmon states that a teacher with nine years experience and a master's degree is paid $41,024.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1987
I am a locksmith for the Los Angeles Unified School District and feel it's time to defend the locksmith profession and the realities within the school district. All locksmiths are required to work 8 hours a day, 260 days a year, for a salary of $31,532 or $15.16 per hour; teacher's are required to work 6 hours a day, 180 days a year, for a salary ranging from $20,600 to $35,500 or, in laymen's terms, $19 to $32 an hour, depending on schooling and years of service. Locksmiths are not afforded the luxury of Christmas and Easter vacations, sabbatical leaves, teacher's aides, substitutes or step increases, as implied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1986 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, Times Staff Writer
A 22-year-old former student at Pasadena's John Muir High School has been arrested in the slayings of the school's most popular teacher and a 17-year-old student, police said Tuesday. Robert Gregg Butler was taken into custody by Pasadena officers late Monday night at his Azusa home and held on suspicion of murder in the Dec. 13 shooting deaths of social sciences teacher Robert Jones, 47, and Ronald McClendon, a junior varsity basketball player, Officer Mike Guerin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Members of United Teachers Los Angeles have approved a one-year labor contract that would shorten the school year and reduce pay in exchange for the preservation of more than 4,000 jobs, the union announced Saturday. The vote tally was 58% in favor of the contract and 42% opposed. Roughly two-thirds of all union members cast ballots. UTLA represents nurses, librarians, counselors, psychologists and psychiatric social workers in addition to classroom instructors. The school board approved the one-year pact Tuesday.
OPINION
January 29, 2012 | By James Encinas, Kyle Hunsberger and Michael Stryer
We're teachers who believe that teacher evaluation, including the use of reliable test data, can be good for students and for teachers. Yes, yes, we know we're not supposed to exist. But we do, and there are a lot more of us. In February the membership of United Teachers Los Angeles will vote on a teacher-led initiative urging union leaders to negotiate a new teacher evaluation system for L.A. Unified. The vote will allow teachers' voices to be heard above the din of warring political figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
For years, Warren Fletcher was regarded by his peers as one of the brightest people in the room, but not someone who someday would head one of the nation's powerful teacher unions, United Teachers Los Angeles. That assessment had to be revised as of Tuesday night. Fletcher emerged with nearly 53% of the vote in a runoff against heavily favored union Vice President Julie Washington, a charismatic figure who has long played a central role on the committee that oversees employee health benefits and in contract negotiations with the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The eight candidates vying to be president of the powerful Los Angeles teachers union share a general belief that public education is endangered by malevolent forces outside and corrupt incompetency inside. From their perspective, corporations seek to bleed dollars from schools and collude with powerful nonprofits, such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; a top-heavy, punitive school district bureaucracy stifles innovation while squandering or squirreling away millions; charter schools abuse teachers, drain public resources and take only the best students; and traditional schools need a lot more money.
OPINION
January 7, 2011 | By Kirti Baranwal and Gillian Russom
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, in an inflammatory speech last month, referred to United Teachers Los Angeles as the "loudest opponent and the largest obstacle to creating quality schools. " In his enthusiasm to join the national chorus blaming teachers unions, he chose to ignore the myriad positive reforms teachers are making in L.A. schools with the support of our union leadership. We are UTLA representatives at schools in the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, or PLAS, which is affiliated with the mayor's office, and which the mayor has repeatedly identified as "my partnership schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A mayor with deep roots in the labor movement now finds himself denounced in some quarters as a turncoat ? a description he calls absurd. "No one buys that turncoat stuff," Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said the other day at a union-sponsored event in Watts. "But I am challenging orthodoxies in a way that we have to. " The mayor's recent branding of United Teachers Los Angeles, the L.A. teachers union, as "one unwavering roadblock" to his effort to reform public schools has raised ire in organized labor circles, even though he began his political career as a union organizer.
OPINION
May 16, 1993
The leadership of LEARN is deeply disappointed by the vote of the United Teachers of Los Angeles governing board to oppose the LEARN plan to reform the Los Angeles Unified School District. Their characterization of the plan (May 4) as one that infringes on teacher rights and/or protections is just plain wrong! No reasonable person, having read the plan, could conclude that it is somehow a step backward for teachers. During the entire two-year process of community consensus building to develop the plan, teachers stepped forward and were represented in greater number than any other single group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1986 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley junior high school principal who reportedly lowered a student's grade over objections of the child's teacher said Friday that the teacher's original grade will stand. Los Angeles school district officials said they would not take any disciplinary action against the principal, even though the state Education Code prohibits administrators from changing a student's grade except in extreme circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
With a hard-hitting speech that branded the city's teachers union as an unyielding obstruction to education reforms, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa set the stage this week for a new battle over control of the troubled Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second-largest. In a Sacramento address to state leaders , Villaraigosa ? himself a longtime teachers union employee before launching a career in public office ? declared that education in Los Angeles stands at "a critical crossroads," and he assailed United Teachers Los Angeles for resisting change.
OPINION
August 17, 2010
What we can learn Re "Who's teaching our kids?," Aug. 15 My wife and I are both retired California public school educators. We want to commend The Times for its investigation into the effectiveness of teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District. You have brought much-needed light. Though our respective careers were far different — my wife taught in elementary grades; I worked in secondary grades — we often had to evaluate ourselves because there was no way to compare our performance with other teachers'.
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