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NEWS
August 20, 1989
Simon Nkoli, a gay anti-apartheid black South African activist, will speak at the morning worship service of Unity Fellowship Church, 5149 Jefferson Blvd., at 11:30 a.m. next Sunday. Nkoli, who spent three years in a South African jail before being acquitted of treason charges, will be honored at a benefit reception at 8 p.m. Saturday at the home of Travis Emory, 1616 W. 25th St.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 1995
As a proud black lesbian and an equally proud member of Unity Fellowship Church, I am writing this short letter to commend you on Mark Sachs' interview with our Bishop Carl Bean ("Putting AIDS Compassion on the MAP," March 26). The article was not only well done, inspirational and uplifting, but portrayed a member of our community in a prominent and positive light! Please allow me to give a small testimony to what Bishop Bean and Unity Fellowship have meant in my life. I have lived in Los Angeles for 20 years, and in those years, searched diligently for a "church home."
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NEWS
October 18, 1992
Many readers of the article "Good News at Unity" (Oct. 5) about a church known as Unity Fellowship Church and its minister, the Rev. Carl Bean, may have been confused. The writer and perhaps the Rev. Bean, in choosing his church's name, must have been unaware of the 103-year-old worldwide Unity movement headquartered at Unity Village, Mo. Locally the Unity message can be received in the 46 Unity churches and centers in Southern California. It is clear that the Rev. Bean is doing wonderful work in his ministry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Unity Fellowship Church and its founder and pastor, Bishop Carl Bean, are to be honored Mondayfor their ministry to gays and lesbians in minority communities. The church, which was founded in 1985, will receive the Prophetic Witness Award from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Greater Los Angeles and the Martin Luther King Legacy Assn. at the 16th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Dinner Celebration at the Westin Bonaventure hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Unity Fellowship Church and its founder and pastor, Bishop Carl Bean, are to be honored Mondayfor their ministry to gays and lesbians in minority communities. The church, which was founded in 1985, will receive the Prophetic Witness Award from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Greater Los Angeles and the Martin Luther King Legacy Assn. at the 16th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Dinner Celebration at the Westin Bonaventure hotel.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suicide note is worn and deeply creased. The man who wrote it sits at the cluttered desk in his Los Angeles office and reads in a near-whisper. "Dear Mother and Dad, I know you don't love me . . . . " The 12-year-old boy who wrote the neatly penciled letter 36 years ago in Baltimore figured death would take care of the loneliness he felt when everything he loved--his foster parents, his schoolmates and his church--shunned him. "And I had done nothing but be born gay," says the Rev.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
As a proud black lesbian and an equally proud member of Unity Fellowship Church, I am writing this short letter to commend you on Mark Sachs' interview with our Bishop Carl Bean ("Putting AIDS Compassion on the MAP," March 26). The article was not only well done, inspirational and uplifting, but portrayed a member of our community in a prominent and positive light! Please allow me to give a small testimony to what Bishop Bean and Unity Fellowship have meant in my life. I have lived in Los Angeles for 20 years, and in those years, searched diligently for a "church home."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2008 | Richard Marosi
A clergyman from San Diego who had been reported missing last week was found dead in a Tijuana apartment Wednesday night, the apparent victim of a drug overdose, according to Mexican authorities. The Rev. Charles Lanier, 51, pastor of Unity Fellowship Church, had not been seen since he told friends two weeks ago that he was going to a local supermarket. His car was found Feb. 22 near the border in San Ysidro in a parking lot that is used by people who cross into Mexico by foot. Lanier was a recovering substance abuser, said the Rev. Russell Thornhill, a spokesman for the church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
Singer Dionne Warwick, whose 1986 collaborative song, "That's What Friends Are For," raised about $2 million for AIDS research, was honored Saturday night by a national gay and lesbian support group. The group, Parents & Friends of Lesbians and Gays, or PFLAG, chose Warwick as the ninth recipient of the organization's Humanitarian Award because of her continuing work for those stricken with AIDS through the Warwick Foundation, spokesman David Fuller said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
A mural believed to be the first dealing with the subject of AIDS will be dedicated next Sunday at the Minority AIDS Project at 5149 W. Jefferson Blvd. The mural, designed and painted by artists Mary-Linn Hughes and Reginald Zachary, reaches out with the message "Love is for everyone" and portrays a broad range of people--gay and straight, men, women and children of various races--affected with AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease. The 2 p.m.
NEWS
October 18, 1992
Many readers of the article "Good News at Unity" (Oct. 5) about a church known as Unity Fellowship Church and its minister, the Rev. Carl Bean, may have been confused. The writer and perhaps the Rev. Bean, in choosing his church's name, must have been unaware of the 103-year-old worldwide Unity movement headquartered at Unity Village, Mo. Locally the Unity message can be received in the 46 Unity churches and centers in Southern California. It is clear that the Rev. Bean is doing wonderful work in his ministry.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suicide note is worn and deeply creased. The man who wrote it sits at the cluttered desk in his Los Angeles office and reads in a near-whisper. "Dear Mother and Dad, I know you don't love me . . . . " The 12-year-old boy who wrote the neatly penciled letter 36 years ago in Baltimore figured death would take care of the loneliness he felt when everything he loved--his foster parents, his schoolmates and his church--shunned him. "And I had done nothing but be born gay," says the Rev.
NEWS
August 20, 1989
Simon Nkoli, a gay anti-apartheid black South African activist, will speak at the morning worship service of Unity Fellowship Church, 5149 Jefferson Blvd., at 11:30 a.m. next Sunday. Nkoli, who spent three years in a South African jail before being acquitted of treason charges, will be honored at a benefit reception at 8 p.m. Saturday at the home of Travis Emory, 1616 W. 25th St.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"AIDS/US/WOMEN" yells fire in a crowded theater. The fire is the plague and the theaters are various ones throughout L.A. from now through mid-June. But make no mistake, this is much more urgent than your average one-act. "AIDS/US/WOMEN" doesn't scale the heights of Stanislavskian staging finesse. In fact, it often lurches and stutters. But there aren't many regular pieces of theater that can leave audiences sobbing, speechless and otherwise thrown for an emotional loop like this work does.
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