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Universal Declaration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001
It is not true, as stated in a May 9 letter, that the U.S. did not sign the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights. On Dec. 10, 1948, the General Assembly of the U.N. adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by a vote of 48-0, with eight abstentions. The U.S. voted in favor. The chairperson of the commission that drafted the declaration was former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Irving Sarnoff Founder, Friends of the United Nations, Santa Monica
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OPINION
May 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
"Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance. " So says the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the United Nations in 1948. But a voluminous report issued by the State Department last week demonstrates that those lofty principles continue to be widely dishonored.
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OPINION
May 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
"Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance. " So says the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the United Nations in 1948. But a voluminous report issued by the State Department last week demonstrates that those lofty principles continue to be widely dishonored.
OPINION
September 21, 2006
Re "At U.N., Bush Urges Reform in Middle East," Sept. 20 Speaking at the United Nations on Tuesday, President Bush referred to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, emphasizing that the "equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world." It's too bad he didn't read a bit further, specifically Article 5: "No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment." Our administration has been engaging in torture since the beginning of the so-called war on terror, all the while denying that it does so. The hypocrisy shown by Bush seems to have no bounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1988
Thank you for printing the complete Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the 40th anniversary of its adoption by the General Assembly of the United Nations, and for reporting on Eleanor Roosevelt and her role as chair of the commission which drew up this remarkable document. How wonderful it would be if those concerned with attempts at peacemaking in the Mideast (and elsewhere) could focus on the goals of equal justice, equal security, and equal dignity for all humankind. GRACE EHLMANN Calabasas
OPINION
April 26, 2003
Re "Human Rights Era Eclipsed," Opinion, April 20: It is amazing that an article dealing with the age of human rights does not once mention a major accomplishment of the United Nations: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, passed in 1948. This document codified in 30 articles what are fundamental basic human rights -- and has been used by countries worldwide. The chair of the U.N. Commission that produced this historic document was our own Eleanor Roosevelt. It would be a real service to our collective understanding if The Times could publish this important document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1987
Recently a group of American citizens demonstrated in front of the White House championing human rights for some Soviet citizens of the Jewish faith. Today human rights are violated by the Israeli authorities who practice oppression, torture, intimidation and colonial settlements against innocent civilians in the Gaza Strip. I've heard nothing of those who champion human rights saying or doing anything to help those people in the Gaza Strip. Is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights confined to one group of people or is it as it was meant to be, universal?
NEWS
December 11, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Tuesday chastised friends and foes alike for human rights violations, calling on South Africa to end its policy of apartheid and criticizing the Soviet-backed regimes in Afghanistan and Cambodia. Reagan used a White House ceremony commemorating the 37th anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to remind Soviet leader Mikhail S.
OPINION
September 21, 2006
Re "At U.N., Bush Urges Reform in Middle East," Sept. 20 Speaking at the United Nations on Tuesday, President Bush referred to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, emphasizing that the "equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world." It's too bad he didn't read a bit further, specifically Article 5: "No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment." Our administration has been engaging in torture since the beginning of the so-called war on terror, all the while denying that it does so. The hypocrisy shown by Bush seems to have no bounds.
OPINION
April 26, 2003
Re "Human Rights Era Eclipsed," Opinion, April 20: It is amazing that an article dealing with the age of human rights does not once mention a major accomplishment of the United Nations: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, passed in 1948. This document codified in 30 articles what are fundamental basic human rights -- and has been used by countries worldwide. The chair of the U.N. Commission that produced this historic document was our own Eleanor Roosevelt. It would be a real service to our collective understanding if The Times could publish this important document.
BOOKS
June 3, 2001 | BLANCHE WIESEN COOK, Blanche Wiesen Cook is distinguished professor of history at John Jay College and the author of "Eleanor Roosevelt."
The Cold War has been over for 10 years, but there is no peace and there has been no victory. As we plan to militarize the heavens, it is almost an act of restorative justice to recall that the United Nations, founded by 50 nations in San Francisco on June 25, 1945, after three months of deliberation, promised peace not merely as the absence of violent conflict but in terms of human rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001
It is not true, as stated in a May 9 letter, that the U.S. did not sign the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights. On Dec. 10, 1948, the General Assembly of the U.N. adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by a vote of 48-0, with eight abstentions. The U.S. voted in favor. The chairperson of the commission that drafted the declaration was former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Irving Sarnoff Founder, Friends of the United Nations, Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999
As we read the news each day, we are shocked into awareness of human rights abuses in other countries. The United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which is 52 years old this month, may seem unnecessary to many of us who enjoy the liberties and privileges of living in the United States. News reports remind us that others are not so lucky. The Bahai faith builds its human rights program around its belief in the oneness of humankind. Founder Baha'u'llah said more than a century ago, "The Earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens."
OPINION
February 28, 1993
Some highlights: * Everyone has the right to life, liberty, and the security of person. * No one shall be held in slavery or servitude. * No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment. * No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention, or exile. * Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience, and religion. * Everyone has the right to work, . . . (and) to rest and leisure, including . . . holidays with pay.
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