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Universal Health Care

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OPINION
September 20, 2002
The United States is the only major industrialized country in the world that lacks universal health care. As anyone who witnessed the meltdown of the Clinton administration's universal health coverage plan in the early 1990s can attest, leaders in Washington have not agreed on how--or, more significantly, whether--the nation should guarantee medical access.
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NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By David Horsey
Despite the fact that there have been many brilliant thinkers through the centuries who called themselves conservatives, it does seem that, when we look at things through the rearview mirror of American history, it is conservatives who are left stuck in the mud. Today's conservatives may call themselves tea partiers, but the original bunch that tossed boxes of tea over the side of British ships was a gaggle of radicals, not conservatives. In 1776, it was conservative people who thought the Declaration of Independence was a traitorous document.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2003 | Charles Ornstein and Sue Fox, Times Staff Writers
The passage of a landmark California bill that would require all but the smallest businesses to provide health insurance to their workers may give new traction to sputtering efforts in other states to expand health coverage, experts said Sunday. The California measure, along with a new Maine law, offers hope for those seeking to reduce the number of uninsured Americans, now estimated at more than 40 million.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Count the Club for Growth, the influential Washington anti-tax group, among those horrified at the thought of a Donald Trump presidential bid. "Donald Trump for president? You've got to be joking," Club for Growth's president, former Rep. Chris Chocola, said in a statement Monday. The club's problem with Trump is not his penchant for endless self-promotion, his famous hair, or the fact that a man named Meat Loaf could still win "Celebrity Apprentice. " It's that Trump, in his last incarnation as a presidential candidate in 2000, wrote a book in which he favored universal health care and championed a one-time soak-the-rich tax to clear the nation's debt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000
The Times' Jan. 23 editorial, "Health Insurance Crisis," appropriately calls attention to the 7.3 million Californians without health insurance and notes that this number is growing by 23,000 a month. Various piecemeal reforms, such as vouchers and tax credits, are mentioned, but it is not observed that we are dealing with a problem long solved by other Western industrial countries--they all have universal heath insurance. The U.S. pioneered in instituting publicly funded schools open to all residents.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
Florida's Legislature adopted its own version of a universal health care plan Saturday, and Gov. Lawton Chiles said it could be a model for the federal government to follow. Legislative approval of Chiles' proposal to pool the purchasing power of the private and public sectors through regional alliances makes Florida the first state to adopt a plan for what the industry calls managed competition, according to Doug Cook, Chiles' top health care aide.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1991 | JAMES A. THOMMES, JAMES A. THOMMES is a physician with a medical practice in Beverly Hills. and
Several weeks ago, California's Major Risk Medical Insurance Board agreed to provide comprehensive health insurance for state residents who have been denied coverage due to pre-existing conditions such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and exposure to the AIDS virus. Under this new program, otherwise uninsurable Californians will pay 125% of the average monthly health-care premium for healthy individuals in their age group and location.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2001 | ROBERT B. REICH, Robert B. Reich, secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration, is co-founder and the national editor of the American Prospect. His most recent book is "The Future of Success" (Alfred A. Knopf, 2001)
What better time than now to revive the idea of universal health care? There's a huge budget surplus. Meanwhile, the number of Americans lacking health insurance continues to rise (now almost 43 million, up from 38 million 10 years ago). And those who have it are paying more than ever in co-payments, deductibles and premiums. As the economy sinks, working families will have an even harder time. If they lose their jobs, their health insurance may disappear.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A campaign to make Maine the first state with universal health care faces an important test of public opinion next week amid a TV ad blitz waged against the idea by the insurance industry. A nonbinding resolution on Tuesday's ballot in Portland calls on the city to encourage government-run health care for everyone. Maine already has experimented with ways to cut health care costs and expand coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alice Heidy, 47, a health care advocate and administrator who, as director of Clinica Para Las Americas, helped prevent the Los Angeles free clinic from closing in the mid-1990s and expanded its services, died June 16 of undisclosed causes. The Idaho-born Heidy grew up in Royal City, Wash. She received her bachelor's degree in nursing from Eastern Washington University and her master's in public health from UCLA. She lived in Managua, Nicaragua, in the 1980s.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
It is a political paradox. Both in the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, voters ranked health care at the top when asked which issues most concerned them. But health care has been almost a nonissue in shaping voters' decisions on which candidates to support, polls in the contests showed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2003 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
The mostly leather-jacket-and-denim crowd huddled around the amplifiers, beers in hand, shouting over the opening acts about their first time seeing the headliner. They had memorized his favorite one-liners and quoted him reverently. Some carried business cards identifying themselves as loyalists. On the surface, they were a mild-mannered bunch of boomers.
OPINION
November 3, 2003
The double-digit rise in health-care premiums in each of the last four years was the key reason three supermarket chains and some government agencies this year decided to begin paring their workers' health benefits, prompting recent union walkouts. It doesn't take a calculus major to see that something's wrong with the economics of the nation's health-care system. The United States spends $1.
OPINION
October 25, 2003
At first I was disheartened by "For Some, Strikes Are No Big Deal" (Oct. 22), but as I read on, I became angry. It is a gross exaggeration to assume that because Angelenos are not personally affected by the strikes, it must follow that they don't care. Many of us who are inconvenienced are refusing to cross picket lines out of concern and in support of the strikers. If I did not care, I would go to the major chain that is a mere two blocks from my house instead of driving to a more expensive one across town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2003 | Steve Lopez
I got a call the other day from a man named Jim Chavez, who lives in Chino and wanted to tell me why he's crossing the supermarket picket lines. Chavez answered the door with his wife, Sylvia, and led me to his office -- a converted garage. "Look at this," the self-employed headhunter said, grabbing a health insurance statement off a shelf. His health care premiums have gone up every year for four straight years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2003
The Budget Some of the liveliest exchanges during Wednesday's recall debate occurred in response to a question about balancing the state budget. McClintock began by proposing spending cuts: Tom McClintock: This state is already spending a larger portion of people's earnings than at any time in its history .... * Peter Camejo: Tom wants to cut, cut, cut. I want to put more money into education.... All they want to do is cut, cut, and rip, rip, over here to my right....
BUSINESS
February 13, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a proposal some experts say throws an important new element into the national debate on health care, California Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi Wednesday unveiled a plan for universal health care that would have state government guarantee access while giving consumers a choice of a variety of privately managed health care providers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2003 | Charles Ornstein and Sue Fox, Times Staff Writers
The passage of a landmark California bill that would require all but the smallest businesses to provide health insurance to their workers may give new traction to sputtering efforts in other states to expand health coverage, experts said Sunday. The California measure, along with a new Maine law, offers hope for those seeking to reduce the number of uninsured Americans, now estimated at more than 40 million.
OPINION
September 2, 2003
Re "Dean Out Front by 21 Points in N.H., Poll Finds," Aug. 28: If the folks in New Hampshire really wanted "a-take-no-prisoners Democrat even if that candidate seemed unlikely to defeat President Bush," they would be supporting Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio), who makes former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean look a bit like "Bush lite" in comparison. Too bad more people (and more of the press) are not paying enough attention to a man who argues for substantial reform in all the areas this country needs it: defense, corporate malfeasance, universal health care and much more.
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