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OPINION
April 10, 2006
Re "Massachusetts Poised to Require Health Insurance," April 5 At last -- a proposed universal healthcare plan for all, at least in Massachusetts. Aside from immigration, this is our most important issue in the U.S. I am a Democrat but support Gov. Mitt Romney's plan to relieve our citizens of expensive healthcare costs. ERIC SAUDI Altadena
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OPINION
November 21, 2013
Re "Healthcare enrollment rises sharply," Nov. 19 Persuading young and healthy people to buy insurance shouldn't be so hard. They will, of course, need that healthcare when they are old, so perhaps they should be promised lower premiums in the future as a reward for paying into the system when they are young. When they're older, they'll be glad they had the foresight to be a little community-minded. As a society, there are some things for which it makes sense to pool resources to benefit all for the long term.
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SCIENCE
February 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
You're more likely to get a doctor's appointment in Canada if you're rich than if you're poor, even though the government pays the bills, according to a new study. In the spring and summer of 2011, a team of Canadian researchers posing as prospective patients cold-called 375 doctors offices in Ontario to schedule a check-up. The researchers posed in each call as one of four types: a wealthy banker in good health, a wealthy banker with diabetes and back problems, a welfare recipient in good health, or a welfare recipient with diabetes and back problems.
OPINION
March 9, 2013
Re "Stuck in a healthcare quagmire," Opinion, March 5 Jonah Goldberg tells us that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, is projected to add $6.2 trillion to our deficit over 75 years. For this "fact," he cites a January study by the Government Accountability Office. Goldberg either failed to understand or misled readers on the point that the GAO report was a hypothetical study on what would happen to the deficit if "the fall 2010 assumed cost-containment mechanisms specified in [Obamacare]
OPINION
September 21, 2006
Re "Sick but Insured? Think Again," Sept. 17 WellPoint's practice of denying claims based on a patient's alleged misrepresentations of preexisting conditions is infuriating in many ways, not the least of which is the rip-off of California taxpayers that results. Explaining why his company persists in dubiously rejecting claims, a Blue Shield spokesman said that otherwise "we will end up with all the high-risk people." Fortunately for individuals who are abandoned by their insurer, the state can provide assistance.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
washington -- Labor leader Andrew Stern, president of the Service Employees International Union, has become one of the most outspoken and unconventional proponents of healthcare changes to guarantee coverage for all while reining in costs. His pursuit of that goal has led him into unusual alliances with corporate and political leaders, including Wal-Mart Chief Executive H. Lee Scott Jr. and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, although Stern's union opposed the governor's reelection. Stern was interviewed in his Washington office.
OPINION
October 18, 2009 | DOYLE McMANUS
At least one country already has a healthcare plan roughly similar to the one President Obama and the Democrats have proposed, with universal coverage, a mandate that everyone buy insurance and a major role for private insurance companies: Switzerland. So I used part of a vacation last week to head for the Swiss Alps to observe the system in practice. Dr. Jean-Oscar Meile, 53, runs a tidy one-man practice in Melide, a suburb of Lugano in Switzerland's Italian-speaking south.
OPINION
December 4, 2008
Re "Health reform goals sharpen," Dec. 1 The Times' front page article describes a consensus forming in favor of a universal healthcare system dominated by the private health insurance industry. Yet the article clearly indicates why a government-operated, single-payer, universal healthcare program is the better way to go. The story notes that "the government will control costs and set standards of care, proposals that raise the unpopular prospect of federal regulators dictating which doctors Americans can see and what drugs they can take."
OPINION
May 12, 2007
Re "Universal healthcare gains unlikely backer," May 7 This article reads like a cleverly disguised ad campaign for the drug companies and big insurers that are pushing to mandate, not provide, health insurance. I would expect The Times to give other plans, such as the single-payer proposal by state Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), equal coverage and present information from all sides. Why doesn't the article explore the question of why our healthcare system doesn't work in the first place?
OPINION
April 9, 2007
Re "Universal healthcare's dirty little secrets," Opinion, April 5 Michael Tanner and Michael Cannon's screed against universal healthcare coverage deserves publication of a piece balancing their extreme views and cherry-picked review of "the facts." I'll restrict my criticism to their claim that "simply saying that people have health insurance is meaningless," and their citation that there is "no evidence" of a relationship between lack of insurance and ill health. To the contrary, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences has determined that lack of health insurance in and of itself is responsible for 18,000 deaths per year in the U.S. The omission of this well-disseminated determination should allow readers to make their own judgments about the objectivity of the authors.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
You're more likely to get a doctor's appointment in Canada if you're rich than if you're poor, even though the government pays the bills, according to a new study. In the spring and summer of 2011, a team of Canadian researchers posing as prospective patients cold-called 375 doctors offices in Ontario to schedule a check-up. The researchers posed in each call as one of four types: a wealthy banker in good health, a wealthy banker with diabetes and back problems, a welfare recipient in good health, or a welfare recipient with diabetes and back problems.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
JERUSALEM -- Mitt Romney spent his final morning in Israel mingling with top donors, including super PAC mega-donor Sheldon Adelson. The group of more than 40 donors gathered for a breakfast Monday morning at the King David Hotel in Jerusalem. They were required to raise or donate $25,000 to $50,000 for entry. The event is expected to raise more than $1 million, according to the campaign's finance director, after a fundraiser in London last week that raised more than $2 million. Adelson, a casino magnate, has directed tens of millions of dollars to Republican super PACs this year, including $10 million to the independent group supporting Romney.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2012 | David Lazarus
Universal coverage, Medicare for all, single payer - call it what you will. It's clear that conservative forces are determined to prevent such a system from ever being introduced at the national level. So it's up to the states. The catch is that to make universal coverage work at the state level, you'd need some way to channel Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare funds into the system. At the moment, that's difficult if not impossible. But legislation quietly being drafted by Rep. Jim McDermott (D-Wash.)
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Sara Lessley
As the Supreme Court justices asked pointed questions about President Obama's landmark healthcare law Tuesday, and the issue was being hotly debated outside the courtroom,  letter writers to The Times  emailed their own pointed observations of the day's events. Times staff writers David Savage and Noam Levey reported   Tuesday afternoon from Washington: “It is often difficult to tell from oral arguments exactly how the justices will vote, but from their questions, the four conservatives sounded as though they had made up their minds that the mandate is unconstitutional....
OPINION
January 3, 2012
Is nothing sacred? Re "Stars' prints set in cement, not stone," Dec. 29 So the owners of Grauman's Chinese Theatre think it's a jolly good idea to "broaden the range" of the theater's forecourt concrete blocks to include athletes and musicians. Such audacity. May we remind them that this theater is not a sports or rock concert venue but an icon that is truly a repository of Hollywood history and film. Check the daily throngs in the forecourt — the tourists are looking for and taking photos of film favorites, and yes, that includes the past.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | David Lazarus
Conservatives tend to become apoplectic at the thought of the government requiring people to pay for health insurance or any form of public program designed to provide universal coverage. Yet most of those same conservatives — including Republican lawmakers — are perfectly at ease with the idea of requiring that all phone users pay a fee intended to provide universal coverage for telecom services. This disparity (or hypocrisy) was on full display as the one Republican member of the Federal Communications Commission joined his three Democratic colleagues recently in voting to overhaul a decades-old system of providing subsidies for phone service in rural areas.
OPINION
October 16, 2007
Re "Europe's drug antiwar," Opinion, Oct. 12 I was encouraged to see Rick Steves' report on how Europe's common-sense-driven approach to dealing with addiction has resulted in fewer addicts, less personal and societal devastation and gobs of taxpayer money freed up to be spent on other, more pressing social needs. But our leaders can't waste a second on considering this proven strategy because they're overwhelmed trying to find a way to pay for universal healthcare. Hey, wait a second.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Living in a poorer neighborhood might put people at greater risk for having a sudden cardiac arrest, a study finds. Researchers analyzed data on sudden cardiac arrests over one year among 9,235 people in four U.S. cities and three in Canada. They also looked at median household incomes from census tracts to determine the relationship between the arrests and socioeconomic status. In six of the seven cities, the frequency of sudden cardiac arrests was substantially greater in the lowest socioeconomic areas compared with the highest.
HEALTH
July 4, 2011
Thanks for the fantastic article you wrote on me ["Working Out Obesity Issues," June 27]. I will continue my quest to find a doctor who will repair my torn [anterior cruciate ligament] and remove the 40-plus pounds of skin at no cost. I am living in California now and still losing weight. Your weather is amazing! Dana C. Baker Anaheim Pay family doctors well I could have written Dr. Steve Dudley's Health section article on concierge medicine ["Select Care's High Price," June 27]
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