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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Meg James
Nora O'Brien, an NBC Universal program executive working on the series "Parenthood," died Wednesday after collapsing while on location in Berkeley. She was 44. The cast and crew of "Parenthood," a remake of the 1989 Steve Martin film, had taken an evening break from shooting and a few people, including O'Brien, were playing basketball, according to a friend. O'Brien said she felt dizzy and then she collapsed. She was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead, friends said.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Marc Graboff, president of NBC's West Coast business operations and the TV network's longtime consigliere , is leaving the company. His departure will continue a dramatic makeover of NBC Entertainment's executive ranks since Comcast Corp. assumed control of media giant NBCUniversal in January. A few years ago Graboff was the top business executive running the NBC network, but in recent years his role had been diminished, particularly after the arrival of Comcast. Graboff, who had nearly two years remaining on his contract, is planning to join a new venture outside of broadcast television, according to NBC and two people familiar with his plans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | Greg Braxton
The Emmy Awards, which are usually held in the middle of September, will move next year to Aug. 29, executives announced Wednesday. NBC's announcement that it will air the 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards a few weeks earlier than usual will give the network and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences a "head start on creative discussions," said Paul Telegdy, executive vice president of alternative programming for NBC and Universal Media Studios....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | Greg Braxton
The Emmy Awards, which are usually held in the middle of September, will move next year to Aug. 29, executives announced Wednesday. NBC's announcement that it will air the 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards a few weeks earlier than usual will give the network and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences a "head start on creative discussions," said Paul Telegdy, executive vice president of alternative programming for NBC and Universal Media Studios....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2008 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Before the writers strike, the biggest mystery surrounding NBC's "Scrubs" was whether J.D. (Zach Braff) and Elliot (Sarah Chalke) would pull a Ross-Rachel and finally be together in the hospital comedy's final season. But now the bigger question seems to be whether fans of the 7-year-old comedy will watch the finale on NBC, ABC or DVD. Although NBC had ordered 18 episodes for this season, meant to be its last, and 12 were completed before the strike, the network has not committed to allowing producers to complete the final six episodes.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Marc Graboff, president of NBC's West Coast business operations and the TV network's longtime consigliere , is leaving the company. His departure will continue a dramatic makeover of NBC Entertainment's executive ranks since Comcast Corp. assumed control of media giant NBCUniversal in January. A few years ago Graboff was the top business executive running the NBC network, but in recent years his role had been diminished, particularly after the arrival of Comcast. Graboff, who had nearly two years remaining on his contract, is planning to join a new venture outside of broadcast television, according to NBC and two people familiar with his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez and ; Scott Collins
"My Name Is Earl" creator Greg Garcia is a writer because he has a way with words. Asked Tuesday for his take on NBC's unceremonious cancellation of his single-camera comedy, Garcia didn't miss a beat: "It's hard to be too upset about being thrown off the Titanic." In case the reference isn't obvious, NBC is in fourth place among networks, after a lackluster season in which it launched seven new shows -- of them, five are failing and the other two are posting mediocre numbers. Garcia's comment came amid the annual spring upfronts where the major networks gather to pitch media buyers on their upcoming fall and midseason schedules.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | By Denise Martin, Staff Writer
"Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles" had all the makings of a hit, even without Arnold. But after just two shortened seasons, Fox pulled the plug on the blockbuster franchise's move to TV. Ratings had fallen to a series low by May, and it seemed the show was doomed to be unfavorably -- and maybe unfairly -- compared to its iconic source material. This year, the networks are trying something more subtle. More movie reboots are on the way, but rather than plucking from mega properties, the networks have chosen less obvious films to help launch, but not overshadow, new series.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It's NUTS no more. NBC's TV production arm is changing its name from NBC Universal Television Studio, or NUTS for short, to Universal Media Studios. The name change was a nod to the increasing importance of creating entertainment for the Web. The studio produces such TV shows as "House" for Fox, "The Office" and "Heroes" and the cable programs "Battlestar Galactica" and "Monk."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2007 | From City News Service
A revival of the 1989-96 syndicated competition series "American Gladiators" will premiere at midseason on NBC, which is promising "splashy twists including special effects, water skills and the latest technology." As in the original, the new version of "American Gladiators" will pit contestants against eight gladiators in a series of competitions, with the Joust, the Wall, Hang Tough and the Eliminator returning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | By Denise Martin, Staff Writer
"Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles" had all the makings of a hit, even without Arnold. But after just two shortened seasons, Fox pulled the plug on the blockbuster franchise's move to TV. Ratings had fallen to a series low by May, and it seemed the show was doomed to be unfavorably -- and maybe unfairly -- compared to its iconic source material. This year, the networks are trying something more subtle. More movie reboots are on the way, but rather than plucking from mega properties, the networks have chosen less obvious films to help launch, but not overshadow, new series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez and ; Scott Collins
"My Name Is Earl" creator Greg Garcia is a writer because he has a way with words. Asked Tuesday for his take on NBC's unceremonious cancellation of his single-camera comedy, Garcia didn't miss a beat: "It's hard to be too upset about being thrown off the Titanic." In case the reference isn't obvious, NBC is in fourth place among networks, after a lackluster season in which it launched seven new shows -- of them, five are failing and the other two are posting mediocre numbers. Garcia's comment came amid the annual spring upfronts where the major networks gather to pitch media buyers on their upcoming fall and midseason schedules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Meg James
Nora O'Brien, an NBC Universal program executive working on the series "Parenthood," died Wednesday after collapsing while on location in Berkeley. She was 44. The cast and crew of "Parenthood," a remake of the 1989 Steve Martin film, had taken an evening break from shooting and a few people, including O'Brien, were playing basketball, according to a friend. O'Brien said she felt dizzy and then she collapsed. She was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead, friends said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2008 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Before the writers strike, the biggest mystery surrounding NBC's "Scrubs" was whether J.D. (Zach Braff) and Elliot (Sarah Chalke) would pull a Ross-Rachel and finally be together in the hospital comedy's final season. But now the bigger question seems to be whether fans of the 7-year-old comedy will watch the finale on NBC, ABC or DVD. Although NBC had ordered 18 episodes for this season, meant to be its last, and 12 were completed before the strike, the network has not committed to allowing producers to complete the final six episodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Lynn Smith
Stimulated by the ongoing writers strike, NBC executives said Tuesday that they will broadcast the latest episodes of "Monk" and "Psych" -- borrowed from sister cable network USA -- starting in March. The new episodes will be shown first on Friday nights on USA, then again on Sunday nights on NBC, presumably to fill holes left by shows that have had to close production due to the strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez
The fall TV season is only 1 week old, and NBC already has begun picking up new series for next season. On Monday, the network ordered 13 episodes of "Robinson Crusoe," a drama based on Daniel Defoe's classic novel about an Englishman marooned on a tropical island for 28 years.
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