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BUSINESS
March 4, 2000 | By CHUCK PHILIPS,
Setting the stage for an Internet format battle, Seagram's Universal Music Group, the world's largest record company, plans to launch its own digital distribution system within months. The architecture for the system--which is not compatible with formats being developed by Seagram's competitors--grew out of its costly Project Nigel technology, which was developed over the last year with AT&T Corp., BMG Entertainment and Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group, the world's largest record company, is in talks to buy Rondor Music for $400 million to $500 million, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Rondor Music was started in 1962 by Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss, the founders and former co-heads of A&M Records. The Hollywood Reporter earlier today reported that the talks were in an advanced stage.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram's Universal Music Group has signed an agreement with Sunnyvale, Calif.-based InterTrust Technologies to begin testing a piracy-fighting digital distribution security system, sources said. InterTrust's DigiBox software acts like a "virtual" envelope that can wrap around any digital content (from compact discs to MP3 files) and deliver it securely via the Internet or through other methods, including retail store kiosks or cable set-top boxes, sources said.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2000 | By CHUCK PHILIPS,
Setting the stage for an Internet format battle, Seagram's Universal Music Group, the world's largest record company, plans to launch its own digital distribution system within months. The architecture for the system--which is not compatible with formats being developed by Seagram's competitors--grew out of its costly Project Nigel technology, which was developed over the last year with AT&T Corp., BMG Entertainment and Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram's Universal Music Group will announce today that it will make a broad selection of its artists' music available for digital distribution and playback by the newest generation of portable music devices, including the Diamond Multimedia Rio MP3 player and products from Toshiba and Panasonic. Sources say the company will distribute the music with anti-piracy technology, most likely from Sunnyvale, Calif.-based InterTrust Technologies, with which it signed an agreement in May.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seagram Co. today becomes the world's music superpower as it completes its $10.4-billion purchase of PolyGram. Though the company is instantly transformed into the leader in global market share, it is preparing deep cuts--some much deeper than expected at well-known labels--to reduce costs, raise margins and rest the company's future on a leaner roster of acts most likely to generate profit.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group, the world's largest record company, is in talks to buy Rondor Music for $400 million to $500 million, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Rondor Music was started in 1962 by Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss, the founders and former co-heads of A&M Records. The Hollywood Reporter earlier today reported that the talks were in an advanced stage.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group has restructured its e-commerce and advanced technologies division, after the disappointing performance of a system for delivering music to be downloaded over the Internet, and in which the company had invested millions of dollars. Universal has recruited Bruce Hack, who streamlined Seagram's movie and music sectors, to help shape up its e-commerce group.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Todd Martens
The following are some of the Lady Gaga-branded items available for purchase in her official Web store: a USB drive, headphones, tote bags, stickable "body beadz," Christmas cards, sunglasses, temporary tattoos and Bluetooth sets. Noticeably lacking? Action figures. Now, efforts to develop a new Gaga action figure have hit a serious snag. Multiple outlets have reported that MGA Entertainment, the company behind the popular, snotty Bratz doll toy line, has filed a $10-million lawsuit against the pop star.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group has restructured its e-commerce and advanced technologies division, after the disappointing performance of a system for delivering music to be downloaded over the Internet, and in which the company had invested millions of dollars. Universal has recruited Bruce Hack, who streamlined Seagram's movie and music sectors, to help shape up its e-commerce group.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram's Universal Music Group will announce today that it will make a broad selection of its artists' music available for digital distribution and playback by the newest generation of portable music devices, including the Diamond Multimedia Rio MP3 player and products from Toshiba and Panasonic. Sources say the company will distribute the music with anti-piracy technology, most likely from Sunnyvale, Calif.-based InterTrust Technologies, with which it signed an agreement in May.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Seagram's Universal Music Group has signed an agreement with Sunnyvale, Calif.-based InterTrust Technologies to begin testing a piracy-fighting digital distribution security system, sources said. InterTrust's DigiBox software acts like a "virtual" envelope that can wrap around any digital content (from compact discs to MP3 files) and deliver it securely via the Internet or through other methods, including retail store kiosks or cable set-top boxes, sources said.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seagram Co. today becomes the world's music superpower as it completes its $10.4-billion purchase of PolyGram. Though the company is instantly transformed into the leader in global market share, it is preparing deep cuts--some much deeper than expected at well-known labels--to reduce costs, raise margins and rest the company's future on a leaner roster of acts most likely to generate profit.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one in the record industry will be surprised this morning when Island Def Jam Music Group, a division of media giant Vivendi, captures two of the top three positions on the nation's album chart for the second week in a row. The stunner is that one of them is a rock record.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2005 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
Warner Music Group narrowed its fiscal fourth-quarter loss by more than $100 million, thanks to a jump in digital downloads and sales from such artists as the group Green Day, Eric Clapton and Faith Hill, the company announced Thursday. Warner Music's loss of $30 million, or 21 cents a share, in the period ended Sept. 30 contrasts with a $137-million deficit, or $1.27, a year earlier. Revenue rose 13% to $905 million.
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