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BUSINESS
April 20, 1987 | Associated Press
When a 9-year-old boy in Topeka, Kan., badgers his mother into buying him a GI Joe doll at K mart, toy buyers at the discount chain's headquarters in Michigan know the same day. K mart Corp., the nation's second-largest retailer, is linking its thousands of stores into a single computer information system to gain unprecedented control over its far-flung inventory.
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NEWS
April 26, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, Dave Wilson is The Times' personal technology columnist
The future is waiting for you at a grocery store beneath the Hollywood sign. It's a self-checkout system, a computerized cashier that lets you scan your own groceries, pay your bill, collect your coupons and sprint out the door. All this is designed to limit the amount of time you spend waiting in line and reduce expenses for grocery stores, which theoretically translates into lower grocery prices in much the same way that automated teller machines have brought down bank fees. Oh, wait.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1996 | MICHAEL MURPHEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The concept is as old as your mother sewing labels into your clothes before you went to camp. But add a bar code and a computer and you've got a company. At least that's what Michael Chastek and Edward P. Herbert have done. They project that their Lost & Found Co. is going to be selling its computerized labeling service to 800,000 people by the end of 1996. "At the start of 1995," says Herbert, "we had about 3,700 subscribers. But we relaunched the whole product in July under the name I.D.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bar codes for Internet scanners called CueCats made their latest debut in print Sunday in the Dallas Morning News, even as the creators of this new technology grapple with concerns about privacy and ease of use. The Dallas-based company that makes the scanners, Digital Convergence, says that it has given out nearly 2 million of the 10 million CueCats it hopes to distribute this year and that nearly half a million people have installed and used them.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, Dave Wilson is The Times' personal technology columnist
The future is waiting for you at a grocery store beneath the Hollywood sign. It's a self-checkout system, a computerized cashier that lets you scan your own groceries, pay your bill, collect your coupons and sprint out the door. All this is designed to limit the amount of time you spend waiting in line and reduce expenses for grocery stores, which theoretically translates into lower grocery prices in much the same way that automated teller machines have brought down bank fees. Oh, wait.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bar codes for Internet scanners called CueCats made their latest debut in print Sunday in the Dallas Morning News, even as the creators of this new technology grapple with concerns about privacy and ease of use. The Dallas-based company that makes the scanners, Digital Convergence, says that it has given out nearly 2 million of the 10 million CueCats it hopes to distribute this year and that nearly half a million people have installed and used them.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES
At a store in Morrow, Ga., supermarket giant Kroger Co. is taking another step with the scanner concept that it pioneered: At two of eight checkout lanes, customers may unload their carts and scan items themselves. The products then travel along a conveyor belt equipped with a sensor to make sure that all items have been "rung up." The shopper then gets an itemized receipt and pays a cashier. "It's a fairly user-friendly system," said Paul Bernish, a spokesman for Cincinnati-based Kroger.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1998 | Reuters
Symbol Technologies Inc., a leader in bar-code scanning technology, said it has a "serious interest" in acquiring Telxon Corp. for about $612 million, or $38 a share, in cash and stock. Telxon said it had received Symbol's letter of interest and would respond in due course. Telxon, which is based in Akron, Ohio, makes hand-held computers, which are increasingly being used as bar-code scanning expands from grocery stores to other industries.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an initial public stock offering, many stocks nose-dive as investors' expectations early on are deflated. Not so with Eltron International Inc., a Chatsworth maker of bar-code printers. In the year since Eltron went public at $6 a share, its stock has more than tripled to about $22. The company might not be sexy--Eltron's printers are desktop metal boxes that spit out bar-code labels--but its appeal is obvious in its numbers: In the nine months ended Sept. 30, Eltron's profit hit $1.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Nothing was where it was supposed to be at the Vons supermarket in La Crescenta. Where customers could have picked up pickles a day before, suddenly they were peering at Pepperidge Farm cookies instead. And where they once sought salad dressing, they saw soup--and vice versa. Although you couldn't prove it by these mixed-up shoppers, the upheaval was part of Vons' effort to make shopping less frustrating for them and, not incidentally, more profitable for the company. By undertaking a massive overnight transformation of the store--one of about 160 former Safeway locations--the grocery hoped to provide a more logical store layout, with better placement and added space for fast-selling products.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1998 | Reuters
Symbol Technologies Inc., a leader in bar-code scanning technology, said it has a "serious interest" in acquiring Telxon Corp. for about $612 million, or $38 a share, in cash and stock. Telxon said it had received Symbol's letter of interest and would respond in due course. Telxon, which is based in Akron, Ohio, makes hand-held computers, which are increasingly being used as bar-code scanning expands from grocery stores to other industries.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1996 | MICHAEL MURPHEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The concept is as old as your mother sewing labels into your clothes before you went to camp. But add a bar code and a computer and you've got a company. At least that's what Michael Chastek and Edward P. Herbert have done. They project that their Lost & Found Co. is going to be selling its computerized labeling service to 800,000 people by the end of 1996. "At the start of 1995," says Herbert, "we had about 3,700 subscribers. But we relaunched the whole product in July under the name I.D.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an initial public stock offering, many stocks nose-dive as investors' expectations early on are deflated. Not so with Eltron International Inc., a Chatsworth maker of bar-code printers. In the year since Eltron went public at $6 a share, its stock has more than tripled to about $22. The company might not be sexy--Eltron's printers are desktop metal boxes that spit out bar-code labels--but its appeal is obvious in its numbers: In the nine months ended Sept. 30, Eltron's profit hit $1.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA
United Parcel Builds a Better Bar Code: Bar codes have become a fact of life. Just ask former President George Bush, whose astonishment at seeing a supermarket checkout scanner helped sink his 1992 reelection bid. A few years ago, United Parcel Service set out to build a better bar code. What the delivery service company came up with is MaxiCode, which packs a load of information in little more than the space of a thumbnail.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last 10 years, Robert Anselmo has been peddling a checkerboard symbol that he swears is better than the bar code, the familiar black-and-white stripes printed on books, candy bars and other consumer items that enable retailers to electronically ring up sales. "The bar code is wimpy," said the 55-year-old president of Veritec, a Chatsworth firm that markets Vericode, a machine-readable matrix code. Vericode can pack more information in small places, he said.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Nothing was where it was supposed to be at the Vons supermarket in La Crescenta. Where customers could have picked up pickles a day before, suddenly they were peering at Pepperidge Farm cookies instead. And where they once sought salad dressing, they saw soup--and vice versa. Although you couldn't prove it by these mixed-up shoppers, the upheaval was part of Vons' effort to make shopping less frustrating for them and, not incidentally, more profitable for the company. By undertaking a massive overnight transformation of the store--one of about 160 former Safeway locations--the grocery hoped to provide a more logical store layout, with better placement and added space for fast-selling products.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last 10 years, Robert Anselmo has been peddling a checkerboard symbol that he swears is better than the bar code, the familiar black-and-white stripes printed on books, candy bars and other consumer items that enable retailers to electronically ring up sales. "The bar code is wimpy," said the 55-year-old president of Veritec, a Chatsworth firm that markets Vericode, a machine-readable matrix code. Vericode can pack more information in small places, he said.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA
United Parcel Builds a Better Bar Code: Bar codes have become a fact of life. Just ask former President George Bush, whose astonishment at seeing a supermarket checkout scanner helped sink his 1992 reelection bid. A few years ago, United Parcel Service set out to build a better bar code. What the delivery service company came up with is MaxiCode, which packs a load of information in little more than the space of a thumbnail.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES
At a store in Morrow, Ga., supermarket giant Kroger Co. is taking another step with the scanner concept that it pioneered: At two of eight checkout lanes, customers may unload their carts and scan items themselves. The products then travel along a conveyor belt equipped with a sensor to make sure that all items have been "rung up." The shopper then gets an itemized receipt and pays a cashier. "It's a fairly user-friendly system," said Paul Bernish, a spokesman for Cincinnati-based Kroger.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer and
Safeway Stores figured out a few years ago that shoppers bought more candy bars when they were stocked at front-end checkstands than when placed only on racks in the middle of stores. So the Oakland-based chain started stocking the sweets up front. Ralphs Grocery recently found in a store-by-store analysis that sales of fresh pasta had "really exploded" in certain of its locations, according to Al Marasca, executive vice president of the Compton firm.
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