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BUSINESS
February 8, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski wants to overhaul a much-criticized program that helps provide phone service to rural areas by focusing instead on supplying high-speed Internet. The decades-old Universal Service Fund, funded by phone carrier fees charged to long-distance customers, has spread phone service to residents in hard-to-reach areas that often are unprofitable for companies to serve, Genachowski said in a speech Monday to the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- In announcing he was stepping down, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski on Friday touted the agency's efforts to expand high-speed Internet access during his nearly four-year tenure. "I'll always be proud of what we've done technology to harness technology to advance the American dream for the 21st century," Genachowski told FCC employees in a gathering in the commission's meeting room. He said he would step down "in the coming weeks" and thanked the agency's staff for getting "big things done for our country.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Deborah Taylor Tate, one of three Republicans on the five-member Federal Communications Commission, will be leaving the agency when her term expires early next month. Tate, a former telecommunications and public utilities regulator from Tennessee, joined the FCC in January 2006. During her time on the commission, she played an active role in efforts to overhaul the Universal Service Fund, the federal program that subsidizes telephone service in rural and low-income communities.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski wants to overhaul a much-criticized program that helps provide phone service to rural areas by focusing instead on supplying high-speed Internet. The decades-old Universal Service Fund, funded by phone carrier fees charged to long-distance customers, has spread phone service to residents in hard-to-reach areas that often are unprofitable for companies to serve, Genachowski said in a speech Monday to the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The Federal Communications Commission issued three proposals aimed at reining in the soaring costs of the Universal Service Fund, a subsidy program that provides affordable phone service to people in rural areas. The fund is an 11-year-old, multibillion-dollar program financed through a surcharge tacked on to almost every American's phone bill. The surcharge has risen steadily over the last several years to keep up with increasing subsidy demands from phone companies.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1997
Pacific Bell has proposed lowering rates in the state's toll-call market by $305 million a year. The move comes as state regulators weigh approval of SBC Communications Inc.'s planned acquisition of Pac Bell parent Pacific Telesis Group. Higher rates on toll calls had subsidized basic phone service until the PUC opened the market to competition in 1995.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
MCI, AT&T Say Pac Bell, GTE Overstated Rural Subsidy Need: In filings with the California Public Utilities Commission, the long-distance companies argued that Pacific Bell, the main unit of San Francisco-based Pacific Telesis Group, and GTE California, a unit of Stamford, Conn.-based GTE Corp., don't need most of the $1.7-billion universal service fund they are seeking to provide local phone service in remote areas. The long-distance companies said MCI Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2008 | bloomberg news
AT&T Inc. didn't conspire to fix the rate for long-distance surcharges paid by customers, a Kansas jury said Wednesday, rejecting a $400-million claim against the largest U.S. telephone company. The federal jury in Kansas City, Kan., also ordered AT&T to pay $16.9 million to California residential customers who accused the company of breach of contract in the same trial.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission said Thursday that it would allocate $211 million to restore communications services to Hurricane Katrina victims, including providing mobile handsets and 300-minute calling cards. The announcement came at a meeting in Atlanta, where commissioners also heard Gulf Coast broadcasters recount how they fought to keep operating as Katrina knocked out electricity and communications towers. FCC Chairman Kevin J.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The Federal Communications Commission will soon announce that it is cutting the size of long-distance telephone company payments into a fund that will help pay for linking the nation's schools and libraries to the Internet. Under the 1996 Telecommunications Act, long-distance companies are required to pay into a fund, known as the Universal Service Fund, to help subsidize the cost of wiring schools, libraries and rural health-care facilities beginning Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Deborah Taylor Tate, one of three Republicans on the five-member Federal Communications Commission, will be leaving the agency when her term expires early next month. Tate, a former telecommunications and public utilities regulator from Tennessee, joined the FCC in January 2006. During her time on the commission, she played an active role in efforts to overhaul the Universal Service Fund, the federal program that subsidizes telephone service in rural and low-income communities.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2008 | bloomberg news
AT&T Inc. didn't conspire to fix the rate for long-distance surcharges paid by customers, a Kansas jury said Wednesday, rejecting a $400-million claim against the largest U.S. telephone company. The federal jury in Kansas City, Kan., also ordered AT&T to pay $16.9 million to California residential customers who accused the company of breach of contract in the same trial.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The Federal Communications Commission issued three proposals aimed at reining in the soaring costs of the Universal Service Fund, a subsidy program that provides affordable phone service to people in rural areas. The fund is an 11-year-old, multibillion-dollar program financed through a surcharge tacked on to almost every American's phone bill. The surcharge has risen steadily over the last several years to keep up with increasing subsidy demands from phone companies.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission said Thursday that it would allocate $211 million to restore communications services to Hurricane Katrina victims, including providing mobile handsets and 300-minute calling cards. The announcement came at a meeting in Atlanta, where commissioners also heard Gulf Coast broadcasters recount how they fought to keep operating as Katrina knocked out electricity and communications towers. FCC Chairman Kevin J.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2005 | From Reuters
U.S. households could see a government-mandated fee on their telephone bills rise as much as 18.1% by 2007 depending on what changes are made to a fund that subsidizes communications services, congressional budget officials said Monday. Telephone carriers that offer long-distance service are required to pay a percentage of revenues into the Universal Service Fund, which subsidizes telephone service for low-income families as well as Internet access in schools and libraries.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
California regulators agreed Wednesday to investigate whether companies using Internet technology to handle phone calls should be regulated -- and, if so, with how heavy a hand. The Public Utilities Commission's unanimous vote mirrors efforts at the Federal Communications Commission, which is expected today to launch a similar look at the growing use of voice over Internet protocol, or VoIP, which sends voice signals much like e-mail over data networks.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2005 | From Reuters
U.S. households could see a government-mandated fee on their telephone bills rise as much as 18.1% by 2007 depending on what changes are made to a fund that subsidizes communications services, congressional budget officials said Monday. Telephone carriers that offer long-distance service are required to pay a percentage of revenues into the Universal Service Fund, which subsidizes telephone service for low-income families as well as Internet access in schools and libraries.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1996 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996 left a lot of unanswered questions about the character of the "information superhighway"--chief among them the future of universal service. The Federal Communications Commission, charged with working out the many crucial details of the new law, has been been taking public comments on universal service for the last month, and we're starting to see some novel ideas about how this concept might change in the next century.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1997 | Bloomberg News
The Federal Communications Commission will soon announce that it is cutting the size of long-distance telephone company payments into a fund that will help pay for linking the nation's schools and libraries to the Internet. Under the 1996 Telecommunications Act, long-distance companies are required to pay into a fund, known as the Universal Service Fund, to help subsidize the cost of wiring schools, libraries and rural health-care facilities beginning Jan. 1.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1997
Pacific Bell has proposed lowering rates in the state's toll-call market by $305 million a year. The move comes as state regulators weigh approval of SBC Communications Inc.'s planned acquisition of Pac Bell parent Pacific Telesis Group. Higher rates on toll calls had subsidized basic phone service until the PUC opened the market to competition in 1995.
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