Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUniversal South
IN THE NEWS

Universal South

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joke around the country music capital these days is that the creative and commercial health of country music is a lot like the Nasdaq: Things are so low that there's nowhere to go but up. Album sales rebounded slightly during 2001, but they were still down 7.4% from 1998, and one major reason was a lack of exciting new artists. There may be great young talents in town, but they are operating under the radar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries" by Margaret Millar.
THE author known as Ross Macdonald -- real name, Kenneth Millar (1915-83) -- worked hard for what he achieved, and what he achieved, in a 30-year career that took him from obscurity to the cover of Newsweek, was remarkable. Recognized by critics as the successor to Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler and a culminating figure in the American hard-boiled tradition, he was also viewed as a peer by such mainstream literary writers as Reynolds Price, Elizabeth Bowen, Thomas Berger and Eudora Welty.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 23, 2001 | Marc Ballon
Universal Reprographics South Inc., a family-owned Irvine printing and graphics company, said Monday that it has been acquired by rival American Reprographics Co. for an undisclosed amount of cash. A spokesman for American said the company would not lay off any of Universal's 120 workers at offices in Irvine, Costa Mesa and Orange. Family members, however, are leaving. Universal will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary and keep its name, said David Stickney, American's director of marketing.
SPORTS
April 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tony Stewart has gotten many lectures during his time in Nextel Cup. Giving them? Now, that's something new for the former NASCAR champion. "All right everybody, straighten up," Stewart, a grin on his face, told the 30 students as he began his guest professorship Tuesday in NASCAR Marketing at the University of South Carolina. Stewart's time in NASCAR has been marked by skilled driving and a hair-trigger temper.
SPORTS
April 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tony Stewart has gotten many lectures during his time in Nextel Cup. Giving them? Now, that's something new for the former NASCAR champion. "All right everybody, straighten up," Stewart, a grin on his face, told the 30 students as he began his guest professorship Tuesday in NASCAR Marketing at the University of South Carolina. Stewart's time in NASCAR has been marked by skilled driving and a hair-trigger temper.
BOOKS
February 29, 2004 | Lee Siegel, Lee Siegel is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"The Temper of the West" is the vivid, idiosyncratic autobiography of William Jovanovich, who ran the publishing house of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich for 36 years until his departure in 1990, dying 11 years later at the age of 81. Jovanovich entered book publishing in 1947, at a time, he writes, when the heads of houses liked to call themselves "publishers" rather than chairmen or presidents.
BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries" by Margaret Millar.
THE author known as Ross Macdonald -- real name, Kenneth Millar (1915-83) -- worked hard for what he achieved, and what he achieved, in a 30-year career that took him from obscurity to the cover of Newsweek, was remarkable. Recognized by critics as the successor to Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler and a culminating figure in the American hard-boiled tradition, he was also viewed as a peer by such mainstream literary writers as Reynolds Price, Elizabeth Bowen, Thomas Berger and Eudora Welty.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY
One dull gray morning in Manhattan in the 1930s, ThomasWolfe left his tiny 1st Avenue apartment to head downtown, sharing the elevator with a woman and her unruly German shepherd. The dog kept straining at him until her grip broke, then leaped up and planted his paws flat on the chest of the tall and disheveled 6-foot, 6-inch writer with piercing eyes, a sudden celebrity then being assailed all over New York for his notorious first novel, 1929's "Look Homeward, Angel." "Wolfe!
BOOKS
January 19, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, John Balzar is a national correspondent for The Times and contributing writer for Book Review
All these years later, only fragments are left to discover: the pocket lint, the letters and cables and scrawls of handwriting on hotel letterheads. Ernest Hemingway has been gone 35 years. F. Scott Fitzgerald would have been 100 last year. Their editor, Maxwell Perkins, died in New York on June 17, 1947. We can be pretty sure none of them would have deemed this new batch of Lost Generation books worth publishing, and in Hemingway's case, he expressly instructed that his letters not be. But these men strove for greatness, and they achieved it at a propitious time in the history of American literature.
BOOKS
November 8, 1998 | MARY LEFKOWITZ, Mary Lefkowitz, the Andrew W. Mellon professor in the humanities at Wellesley College, is the author of "Not Out of Africa."
Don't look now, but your next-door neighbors may be witches. The probability is higher if you live in California or its antithesis, Massachusetts. How can you tell? Look for someone who is middle-class, white, well-educated and a responsible citizen, either straight or gay. Sound unremarkable? In many respects, so is the kind of witchcraft that these witches practice. They convene at established times in houses of worship set up primarily in their own homes.
BOOKS
February 29, 2004 | Lee Siegel, Lee Siegel is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"The Temper of the West" is the vivid, idiosyncratic autobiography of William Jovanovich, who ran the publishing house of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich for 36 years until his departure in 1990, dying 11 years later at the age of 81. Jovanovich entered book publishing in 1947, at a time, he writes, when the heads of houses liked to call themselves "publishers" rather than chairmen or presidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joke around the country music capital these days is that the creative and commercial health of country music is a lot like the Nasdaq: Things are so low that there's nowhere to go but up. Album sales rebounded slightly during 2001, but they were still down 7.4% from 1998, and one major reason was a lack of exciting new artists. There may be great young talents in town, but they are operating under the radar.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2001 | Marc Ballon
Universal Reprographics South Inc., a family-owned Irvine printing and graphics company, said Monday that it has been acquired by rival American Reprographics Co. for an undisclosed amount of cash. A spokesman for American said the company would not lay off any of Universal's 120 workers at offices in Irvine, Costa Mesa and Orange. Family members, however, are leaving. Universal will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary and keep its name, said David Stickney, American's director of marketing.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY
One dull gray morning in Manhattan in the 1930s, ThomasWolfe left his tiny 1st Avenue apartment to head downtown, sharing the elevator with a woman and her unruly German shepherd. The dog kept straining at him until her grip broke, then leaped up and planted his paws flat on the chest of the tall and disheveled 6-foot, 6-inch writer with piercing eyes, a sudden celebrity then being assailed all over New York for his notorious first novel, 1929's "Look Homeward, Angel." "Wolfe!
BOOKS
November 8, 1998 | MARY LEFKOWITZ, Mary Lefkowitz, the Andrew W. Mellon professor in the humanities at Wellesley College, is the author of "Not Out of Africa."
Don't look now, but your next-door neighbors may be witches. The probability is higher if you live in California or its antithesis, Massachusetts. How can you tell? Look for someone who is middle-class, white, well-educated and a responsible citizen, either straight or gay. Sound unremarkable? In many respects, so is the kind of witchcraft that these witches practice. They convene at established times in houses of worship set up primarily in their own homes.
BOOKS
January 19, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, John Balzar is a national correspondent for The Times and contributing writer for Book Review
All these years later, only fragments are left to discover: the pocket lint, the letters and cables and scrawls of handwriting on hotel letterheads. Ernest Hemingway has been gone 35 years. F. Scott Fitzgerald would have been 100 last year. Their editor, Maxwell Perkins, died in New York on June 17, 1947. We can be pretty sure none of them would have deemed this new batch of Lost Generation books worth publishing, and in Hemingway's case, he expressly instructed that his letters not be. But these men strove for greatness, and they achieved it at a propitious time in the history of American literature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001
American Reprographics Co. in Glendale announced the acquisition of Universal Reprographics South Inc., based in Irvine. The acquisition includes offices in Orange and Costa Mesa in addition to the main office in Irvine. American Reprographics manages and reproduces graphics through a variety of methods, including electronic, digital and traditional photography.
NEWS
November 17, 1994
A look at the fast-moving video rentals in four Orange County neighborhoods. A-One Video, 2265 N. Fairview Ave., Santa Ana. (714) 750-1460. * Little Big League (Columbia Tri-Star) * City Slickers II (Columbia Tri-Star) * Speed (Fox Video) * No Escape (HBO Savoy) * The Cowboy Way (MCA Universal) South Shore Video, 2119 Main St., Suite 4C, Huntington Beach. (714) 960-4262.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|