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March 1, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the early days of the space program to the defeat last year of McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s bid to build the government a reusable rocket with a radical design, the launch pad has been a focal point of Pete Conrad's life. For nearly 40 years, though, someone else was in charge. Whether riding a roaring rocket out of Cape Canaveral or guiding McDonnell Douglas' experimental Delta Clipper-X rocket through its paces in New Mexico, the astronaut was doing it for someone else.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the early days of the space program to the defeat last year of McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s bid to build the government a reusable rocket with a radical design, the launch pad has been a focal point of Pete Conrad's life. For nearly 40 years, though, someone else was in charge. Whether riding a roaring rocket out of Cape Canaveral or guiding McDonnell Douglas' experimental Delta Clipper-X rocket through its paces in New Mexico, the astronaut was doing it for someone else.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the early days of the space program to the defeat last year of McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s bid to build the government a reusable rocket with a radical design, the launch pad has been a focal point of Pete Conrad's life. For almost 40 years though, someone else was in charge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For those who think of space travel as a U.S. government venture--or adventure--the suggestion might sound odd. But NASA chief Daniel Goldin said Saturday he wants to "hand over the keys to the Space Shuttle" to a private company. Many tasks the space agency now performs--such as hauling communication satellites into Earth's orbit--will be done more efficiently and cheaply by companies driven by profit motive, he said.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT and TRACY WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles "Pete" Conrad, the Apollo XII astronaut who was the third man to set foot on the moon, died Thursday night after losing control of his motorcycle on a mountain road near Ojai, authorities said. Conrad, a Huntington Beach resident and Orange County-based businessman whose lifelong aerospace career started with NASA in 1962, died at 5:07 p.m. at Ojai Valley Hospital, five hours after crashing his 1996 Harley, said James Baroni, a Ventura County deputy county coroner.
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