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SPORTS
February 4, 1994 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At what cost victory? For the Alabama Birmingham basketball team, the answer is $15,000, plus expenses. Rather than risk losing a game--and, most likely, a victory--at a juncture in the season when potential playoff teams are under increased scrutiny, Alabama Birmingham made Cal State Northridge an offer Thursday it could not refuse. In exchange for the Matadors moving their Feb. 26 men's basketball home game against the Blazers to Feb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2012 | Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Gene Bartow, the successor to John Wooden as UCLA basketball coach who became the architect of a new and successful athletics program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, died Tuesday evening. He was 81. Bartow, who was diagnosed with stomach cancer two years ago, died at his Birmingham home, according to a university spokesman. Despite starting the athletics program at Alabama Birmingham and establishing the basketball program as nationally competitive, Bartow probably will be most remembered in Los Angeles as the man who replaced arguably the best coach in college basketball history and unarguably the most beloved and respected coach in this city's sports history when in 1975 he took over UCLA's program after Wooden's retirement.
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SPORTS
March 26, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gene Bartow, who built the Alabama Birmingham basketball program from the ground floor to a 1982 NCAA quarterfinal appearance, has resigned after 17 years as the school's only coach. UAB president J. Claude Bennett made the announcement to surprised seniors gathered Monday night for an awards banquet. Bartow's son, 34-year-old UAB assistant Murry Bartow, will take over, said assistant sports information director Grant Shingleton. Gene Bartow's contract was scheduled to expire in October 1997.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration Wednesday awarded the University of Alabama a $1-million grant for a novel experiment in which every person arrested in Birmingham will be tested for illicit drug use. Those who test positive will be required to attend treatment programs. Jeremy Travis, director of the National Institute of Justice, which will administer the grant, called the Birmingham program a "quantum leap" in national drug policy.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration Wednesday awarded the University of Alabama a $1-million grant for a novel experiment in which every person arrested in Birmingham will be tested for illicit drug use. Those who test positive will be required to attend treatment programs. Jeremy Travis, director of the National Institute of Justice, which will administer the grant, called the Birmingham program a "quantum leap" in national drug policy.
SPORTS
August 5, 1993 | DANNY ROBBINS
Gene Bartow, basketball coach and athletic director at the University of Alabama Birmingham, Wednesday apologized for making comments critical of the late Paul (Bear) Bryant, University of Alabama football coach and athletic director from 1957 to '82. Bartow's comments about Bryant were part of a letter to David Berst, NCAA assistant executive director for enforcement, written in November of 1991. Portions of the letter appeared Wednesday in The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2012 | Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Gene Bartow, the successor to John Wooden as UCLA basketball coach who became the architect of a new and successful athletics program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, died Tuesday evening. He was 81. Bartow, who was diagnosed with stomach cancer two years ago, died at his Birmingham home, according to a university spokesman. Despite starting the athletics program at Alabama Birmingham and establishing the basketball program as nationally competitive, Bartow probably will be most remembered in Los Angeles as the man who replaced arguably the best coach in college basketball history and unarguably the most beloved and respected coach in this city's sports history when in 1975 he took over UCLA's program after Wooden's retirement.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | ASHLEY ESTES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rounding a curve on U.S. 43, a pirate's sneer is one of the first things motorists see. Complete with eye patch and earring, the snaggletoothed raider sits by a leisurely, reclining turtle with its reading glasses on. Nearby, a bullfighter waves a red cape at a charging bull. No, they're not real. They're made entirely of hay, wood and other materials by landowner Jim Bird. His creations have delighted passersby from across the nation--and beyond--for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | KENDALL S. POWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Have you ever tried to read a newspaper with one hand?" asked Leslie McClellan. The 68-year-old man from Gainesville, Fla., knows that it's truly an exercise in frustration. Reading a newspaper is just one of life's daily activities that is a challenge for the two-thirds of the 4 million American stroke survivors who are left physically impaired. (Former President Gerald R. Ford suffered what was called a small stroke Wednesday, but doctors said he does not seem to be significantly impaired).
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | Associated Press
When it comes to safe driving, eyesight is an important element for older people. But a psychology professor's research shows it may not be the only factor. Elderly motorists' visual attention--how they can focus on multiple things at once--is often a better predictor of whether they're likely to crash, said Karlene Ball of Western Kentucky University. "Most older drivers are fine, but there's this small subset who have problems," Ball said.
SPORTS
March 26, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gene Bartow, who built the Alabama Birmingham basketball program from the ground floor to a 1982 NCAA quarterfinal appearance, has resigned after 17 years as the school's only coach. UAB president J. Claude Bennett made the announcement to surprised seniors gathered Monday night for an awards banquet. Bartow's son, 34-year-old UAB assistant Murry Bartow, will take over, said assistant sports information director Grant Shingleton. Gene Bartow's contract was scheduled to expire in October 1997.
SPORTS
February 4, 1994 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At what cost victory? For the Alabama Birmingham basketball team, the answer is $15,000, plus expenses. Rather than risk losing a game--and, most likely, a victory--at a juncture in the season when potential playoff teams are under increased scrutiny, Alabama Birmingham made Cal State Northridge an offer Thursday it could not refuse. In exchange for the Matadors moving their Feb. 26 men's basketball home game against the Blazers to Feb.
SPORTS
August 5, 1993 | DANNY ROBBINS
Gene Bartow, basketball coach and athletic director at the University of Alabama Birmingham, Wednesday apologized for making comments critical of the late Paul (Bear) Bryant, University of Alabama football coach and athletic director from 1957 to '82. Bartow's comments about Bryant were part of a letter to David Berst, NCAA assistant executive director for enforcement, written in November of 1991. Portions of the letter appeared Wednesday in The Times.
HEALTH
April 2, 2001 | Jane E. Allen
The next time you're looking for a good sunscreen, the answer may lie in your tea leaves. It seems that applying extracts of green tea to the skin helps reduce sunburn and protects some cells from the ravages of ultraviolet radiation. Dr. Craig A. Elmets and colleagues at the University of Alabama at Birmingham applied the extracts to the skin of healthy volunteers 30 minutes before they were exposed to simulated solar radiation.
HEALTH
June 21, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Last summer, 10 people died when an 86-year-old man drove his car through the Santa Monica Farmers' Market. The incident fueled debate about the hazards that elderly drivers may pose to others, and in some cases, themselves. But now there's evidence of a policy that can make roads safer for everyone. A new study has found 17% fewer auto crashes among drivers 85 or older in states that require people to renew their driver's licenses in person.
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