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University Of California At Los Angeles Film And Television Archives

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only thing missing Monday was the triumphant booming of the Wurlitzer organ as one silent movie cliffhanger was resolved. Film curators in Westwood announced that the movie buff who purchased most of the inventory of the nation's only silent movie theater last month has decided to place them in UCLA's Film and Television Archive. The donation by David W.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Jo Franklin, producer of the PBS documentaries "Saudi Arabia" (1981), "The Oil Kingdoms" (1983) and "Islam: A Civilization and Its Art" (1994), has given those programs and 111 hours of unaired footage about the Middle East to the UCLA Film & Television Archive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the large number of people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles, the Mexican cinema remains one of the least known to critics as well as to foreign-film fans. Even the most commercial Mexican movies, a staple of downtown theaters for decades, have been all but edged out by Hollywood pictures with Spanish subtitles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2005 | R. Kinsey Lowe
Outfest and the UCLA Film and Television Archive are undertaking a major preservation initiative for gay and lesbian movies, festival Executive Director Stephen Gutwillig announced Thursday night at the event's curtain-raiser at the Orpheum Theatre. The opening of the film festival also was noteworthy for its first-ever introduction by a mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988
The UCLA Film and Television Archives has received a $110,000 grant from the American Film Institute and National Endowment for the Arts Film Preservation Program in support of its nitrate film preservation program. The UCLA archives are one of 12 organizations receiving AFI/NEA grants totaling $355,600 to preserve, safeguard and restore films that might otherwise have been lost due to the deterioration of the nitrate base used in films until the early 1950s.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic.
Despite all the sunshine, or maybe because of it, Los Angeles tends to be a hidden city, a place whose great treasures are not always the obvious ones. So it is that the city's most surprising, most stimulating, most invigorating film event is not the Oscars, not even one of L.A.'s sprightly film festivals, but the UCLA Film and Television Archive's splendid and irreplaceable Festival of Preservation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Jo Franklin, producer of the PBS documentaries "Saudi Arabia" (1981), "The Oil Kingdoms" (1983) and "Islam: A Civilization and Its Art" (1994), has given those programs and 111 hours of unaired footage about the Middle East to the UCLA Film & Television Archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several radio buffs who already feel that not enough respect and attention is paid to old-time radio now fear that their wishes to save what they call a valuable historic radio resource is falling on deaf ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
In Hollywood, even studios become stars. The Disney Studio daily celebrates itself in Anaheim, Orlando, Japan and France and shopping malls everywhere. Universal discovered a form of stardom in its own back lot (and in Florida, too) with tours, stunts and rides. And the recent Ted Turner-produced book and television documentary about MGM, "The Lion That Roared," were commercial celebrations of an old studio's glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time to record slices of life in Hong Kong as it was shifting from British colony to Chinese "special administrative region," dynamic filmmaker Fruit Chan began a trilogy of films set in this transitional period. In the process he revitalized Hong Kong's independent film movement. Chan, whose real name is Chan Kuo, emerges as a major talent in world cinema.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic.
Despite all the sunshine, or maybe because of it, Los Angeles tends to be a hidden city, a place whose great treasures are not always the obvious ones. So it is that the city's most surprising, most stimulating, most invigorating film event is not the Oscars, not even one of L.A.'s sprightly film festivals, but the UCLA Film and Television Archive's splendid and irreplaceable Festival of Preservation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time to record slices of life in Hong Kong as it was shifting from British colony to Chinese "special administrative region," dynamic filmmaker Fruit Chan began a trilogy of films set in this transitional period. In the process he revitalized Hong Kong's independent film movement. Chan, whose real name is Chan Kuo, emerges as a major talent in world cinema.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Archivists and other preservationists are driven. They ache for what has been lost, and they take extraordinary pains to ensure that what now exists is saved for the future. They understand both the power of art and its terrible fragility. Starting Wednesday, Glendale's historic Alex Theatre will host a five-day tribute to the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which is dedicated to keeping our cinematic heritage alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only thing missing Monday was the triumphant booming of the Wurlitzer organ as one silent movie cliffhanger was resolved. Film curators in Westwood announced that the movie buff who purchased most of the inventory of the nation's only silent movie theater last month has decided to place them in UCLA's Film and Television Archive. The donation by David W.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
In Hollywood, even studios become stars. The Disney Studio daily celebrates itself in Anaheim, Orlando, Japan and France and shopping malls everywhere. Universal discovered a form of stardom in its own back lot (and in Florida, too) with tours, stunts and rides. And the recent Ted Turner-produced book and television documentary about MGM, "The Lion That Roared," were commercial celebrations of an old studio's glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the large number of people of Mexican descent living in Los Angeles, the Mexican cinema remains one of the least known to critics as well as to foreign-film fans. Even the most commercial Mexican movies, a staple of downtown theaters for decades, have been all but edged out by Hollywood pictures with Spanish subtitles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Fred Astaire dances on TV again Sunday--if not exactly live, then very much in living color, with even a few nostalgically amusing commercials for 30-year-old Plymouths and DeSotos thrown in between the late dancer-extraordinaire's effortless hoofing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2005 | R. Kinsey Lowe
Outfest and the UCLA Film and Television Archive are undertaking a major preservation initiative for gay and lesbian movies, festival Executive Director Stephen Gutwillig announced Thursday night at the event's curtain-raiser at the Orpheum Theatre. The opening of the film festival also was noteworthy for its first-ever introduction by a mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several radio buffs who already feel that not enough respect and attention is paid to old-time radio now fear that their wishes to save what they call a valuable historic radio resource is falling on deaf ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Fred Astaire dances on TV again Sunday--if not exactly live, then very much in living color, with even a few nostalgically amusing commercials for 30-year-old Plymouths and DeSotos thrown in between the late dancer-extraordinaire's effortless hoofing.
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