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University Of California At Los Angeles Medical Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2008 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
On Sunday, 2,100 doctors, nurses, technicians and managers at UCLA Medical Center will participate in a task of epic proportions: moving to the gleaming new hospital across the street. Although the distance is short, the details are daunting. The shift to the new Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center will require military-style precision.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1995 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to the perils facing the nation's academic medical centers in a turbulent period of cost-cutting, UCLA Medical Center has agreed to acquire Santa Monica Hospital Medical Center, a well-regarded community hospital, for an undisclosed sum. The UC Board of Regents is expected to approve the proposal when it meets this afternoon in San Francisco, officials of both hospitals said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2008 | Charles Ornstein and John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writers
An influential U.S. senator sent a series of letters Friday seeking additional details about four liver transplants at UCLA Medical Center involving patients who were suspected members or associates of Japanese organized crime groups. "While surgeons do not seek to pass moral judgment on the patients they treat, Americans hope at the very least that foreign criminal figures wait in line along with the rest of us," Sen. Charles E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
UCLA's neuropsychiatric hospital has banned all cellphones and laptop computers after a patient posted group photos of other patients on a social networking website, officials confirmed Monday. Dr. Thomas Strouse, medical director of the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, said in a statement that the decision was part of "UCLA Health System's ongoing efforts to enhance patient privacy and confidentiality in compliance with California's patient rights law."
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
UCLA will rename its renowned medical center after Ronald Reagan as soon as friends of the former president fulfill a pledge to donate $150 million to help rebuild the hospital, which was damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, officials announced Wednesday. Reagan supporters have already raised $80 million for the eight-story building, designed by celebrated architect I.M. Pei, and for a separate Reagan library foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
The financial condition of UCLA Healthcare, the largest medical complex in the University of California system, is deteriorating rapidly, and it will soon eliminate about 400 full-time positions to improve its bottom line, according to university officials. In addition to the immediate financial difficulties, construction on new UCLA hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica is running behind schedule and over budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jonah Odim says he walked into a "hornet's nest" four years ago, and the hornets keep following him wherever he goes: across the Canadian border and over state lines, from Georgia to California. Despite his stellar credentials--his Yale education, his Harvard and University of Chicago training--the 43-year-old cardiac surgeon keeps getting stung by questions from 1994, that horrible year in Winnipeg, Canada, in which 12 of his tiny surgical patients died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ten of 12 young children who underwent heart surgery and died at a Winnipeg hospital in 1994--under the care of a physician now at UCLA--might have survived if given proper treatment, a report released Monday said. "The evidence suggests that some of the children need not have died," Associate Chief Judge Murray Sinclair wrote in his final report, following one of the longest inquests in Canadian history. The children, operated on by Dr.
NEWS
August 10, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A whistle-blower lawsuit by two former University of California employees alleges that the university's five medical centers--at UCLA, UC Irvine, UC San Diego, UC San Francisco and UC Davis--billed the government for millions of dollars in fraudulent insurance claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
When penalties were handed out for snooping in UCLA's medical records, it paid to have an M.D. after your name. As a group, doctors at UCLA hospitals who wrongly peeked at the records of pop star Britney Spears got off lighter than other staffers, according to reports released Friday by state health inspectors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
UCLA's neuropsychiatric hospital has banned all cellphones and laptop computers after a patient posted group photos of other patients on a social networking website, officials confirmed Monday. Dr. Thomas Strouse, medical director of the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, said in a statement that the decision was part of "UCLA Health System's ongoing efforts to enhance patient privacy and confidentiality in compliance with California's patient rights law."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
The financial condition of UCLA Healthcare, the largest medical complex in the University of California system, is deteriorating rapidly, and it will soon eliminate about 400 full-time positions to improve its bottom line, according to university officials. In addition to the immediate financial difficulties, construction on new UCLA hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica is running behind schedule and over budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2003 | Monte Morin, Times Staff Writer
A team of UCLA physicians flew to Guatemala on Monday night to help treat one of two formerly conjoined twins who fell critically ill with an infection this month, medical officials said. In a prepared statement released Monday, officials at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital said 21-month-old Maria Teresa Quiej Alvarez had "improved significantly" since she was hospitalized two weeks ago in Guatemala City with E. coli meningitis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California has agreed to pay $22.5 million to settle allegations that physicians at teaching hospitals at UCLA and four other campuses overbilled the government in filing Medicare claims, officials announced Friday. The U.S. attorney's office said the payment was to compensate for overcharges for physician services at the medical centers between 1994 and 1998. The university denied any wrongdoing in the 13-page settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A surgical tool that emits tiny sparks was being used in a UCLA Medical Center operating room in which a 26-year-old woman died Monday after her bedclothes caught fire, fire officials said Tuesday. The device, a penlike electric cauterizer, caused a similar operating-room fire two years ago that resulted in the death of a 19-day-old infant at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In an unusual transplant case, surgeons at UCLA Medical Center performed quadruple bypass surgery on a donated heart before implanting the organ into a 68-year-old man who was dying of heart disease. The transplant is considered uncommon because surgeons usually accept only hearts that are in near-perfect condition and refuse to use hearts that have arteries clogged with fatty deposits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ten of 12 young children who underwent heart surgery and died at a Winnipeg hospital in 1994--under the care of a physician now at UCLA--might have survived if given proper treatment, a report released Monday said. "The evidence suggests that some of the children need not have died," Associate Chief Judge Murray Sinclair wrote in his final report, following one of the longest inquests in Canadian history. The children, operated on by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a quick glance, he looked like a doctor. The well-dressed man carried a laser surgery textbook and comfortably maneuvered his way around UCLA Medical Center. But authorities said he was actually an ex-con and drug addict on a very un-Hippocratic mission: to steal wallets and valuables from physicians and other hospital staff members to the tune of $50,000 in just one day and, they suspect, much more over the last few weeks.
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