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University Of California At Los Angeles Medical Center

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2003 | Monte Morin, Times Staff Writer
A team of UCLA physicians flew to Guatemala on Monday night to help treat one of two formerly conjoined twins who fell critically ill with an infection this month, medical officials said. In a prepared statement released Monday, officials at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital said 21-month-old Maria Teresa Quiej Alvarez had "improved significantly" since she was hospitalized two weeks ago in Guatemala City with E. coli meningitis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2003 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Just over a year ago, 16-month-old Delaney Lucille Gonzalez walked with her family into UCLA Medical Center for routine surgery to repair a cleft palate. Three days later, she was disconnected from life support and died in her mother's arms. "To bring a healthy child in there for surgery so minor," her mother, Jodi, said recently, clutching a headband she had made for Delaney, "you just don't accept that she's going to die."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2002 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 22-hour operation, a team of UCLA surgeons Tuesday separated 1-year-old twins who had been conjoined at the head, an operation that drew attention from Los Angeles to the infants' hometown in Guatemala. Doctors at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital said that the surgery went well, but that it will be at least a week before Maria Teresa and Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez are out of danger. "They're through the critical phase," Dr.
HEALTH
April 22, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL
Today, folks at UCLA will bury a small, cone-shaped container to commemorate the university's new replacement hospital in Westwood, currently under construction. If the officials' self-restraint is anything like mine, they'll be digging it up next week--but the idea is to wait until the year 2030, fully 25 years after the hospital opens. Then, with much pomp and circumstance, they'll open it and probably giggle at some of the odd, old-fashioned items it contains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California has agreed to pay $22.5 million to settle allegations that physicians at teaching hospitals at UCLA and four other campuses overbilled the government in filing Medicare claims, officials announced Friday. The U.S. attorney's office said the payment was to compensate for overcharges for physician services at the medical centers between 1994 and 1998. The university denied any wrongdoing in the 13-page settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ten of 12 young children who underwent heart surgery and died at a Winnipeg hospital in 1994--under the care of a physician now at UCLA--might have survived if given proper treatment, a report released Monday said. "The evidence suggests that some of the children need not have died," Associate Chief Judge Murray Sinclair wrote in his final report, following one of the longest inquests in Canadian history. The children, operated on by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a quick glance, he looked like a doctor. The well-dressed man carried a laser surgery textbook and comfortably maneuvered his way around UCLA Medical Center. But authorities said he was actually an ex-con and drug addict on a very un-Hippocratic mission: to steal wallets and valuables from physicians and other hospital staff members to the tune of $50,000 in just one day and, they suspect, much more over the last few weeks.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Once regarded as the hardiest UC medical campus in a punishing health care economy, UCLA Medical Center in two years has seen its net income plunge $50 million and bottom out at close to zero. A decade of ever-slimmer payments from managed care plans, a Medicare crash diet prescribed by the federal government and the rising costs of labor and drugs have taken an ugly toll on one of the nation's premier medical institutions, administrators say.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
UCLA will rename its renowned medical center after Ronald Reagan as soon as friends of the former president fulfill a pledge to donate $150 million to help rebuild the hospital, which was damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, officials announced Wednesday. Reagan supporters have already raised $80 million for the eight-story building, designed by celebrated architect I.M. Pei, and for a separate Reagan library foundation.
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