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University Of California At Los Angeles School Of Public Health

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The health care system in Los Angeles County fails to serve the needs of blacks and Latinos for medical care outside the hospital, according to a new report from two researchers at the UCLA School of Public Health and the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The health care system in Los Angeles County fails to serve the needs of blacks and Latinos for medical care outside the hospital, according to a new report from two researchers at the UCLA School of Public Health and the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A potentially explosive chemical has formed in the exhaust ducts of a third-floor laboratory at the UCLA School of Public Health, and the building will be closed for one or more days during the week of Dec. 17 while workers remove the chemical, the dean of the school said Friday. The chemical is perchloric acid crystals. Perchlorates can explode if they are shocked or exposed to heat or some chemicals. "The chemical itself is not dangerous," Abdelmonem A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A potentially explosive chemical has formed in the exhaust ducts of a third-floor laboratory at the UCLA School of Public Health, and the building will be closed for one or more days during the week of Dec. 17 while workers remove the chemical, the dean of the school said Friday. The chemical is perchloric acid crystals. Perchlorates can explode if they are shocked or exposed to heat or some chemicals. "The chemical itself is not dangerous," Abdelmonem A.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A study of nearly 10,000 active Mormons in California credits clean living--no tobacco, regular exercise and a good night's sleep--with some of the largest reductions in risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease ever reported.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A study of nearly 10,000 active Mormons in California credits clean living--no tobacco, regular exercise and a good night's sleep--with some of the largest reductions in risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease ever reported.
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