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University Of California At Merced

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
County supervisors voted this week to ease building regulations around the new UC Merced campus. Supervisors decided not to require developers to substitute other farmland for acreage lost to development and not to require phased development around the campus. The decision follows weeks of plan revisions and hearings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The proposed University of California campus in Merced could severely damage the habitat of the endangered conservancy fairy shrimp and plans for the school may have to be altered, a federal wildlife official said. The school would have to minimize the impact or offer an alternative to encroaching on vernal pools where the shrimp live, said Vicki Campbell of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction of UC Merced will begin in February, with groundbreaking set for May 3, University of California officials said. The complicated permit process for the 10th University of California campus should be completed by then, said James Grant, UC Merced's director of communications.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The long-proposed University of California campus near Merced, bedeviled by the endangered fairy shrimp and other environmental troubles, has secured an $11.5-million grant for a land deal that should allow the campus to open on schedule in 2004. Until the grant came in, university leaders were lamenting that the first class of 1,000 students might have to begin their college education in temporary classrooms off campus.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The political leaders rushing to build a 10th University of California campus north of Merced have been forced to slow down and reconsider the plans because of concerns about the survival of fragile wetlands and an endangered creature called the fairy shrimp. Complaints have increased in recent weeks among federal regulators, university faculty and students that the 2,000-acre UC Merced campus could devastate California's largest remaining cluster of vernal pools.
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