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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The University of San Francisco School of Law has received a $3.25-million grant from the Koret Foundation. The money will be used to reconstruct Kendrick Hall, the law school's home for 40 years. The refurbished building will be named the Koret Law Center. The Koret Foundation is one of the largest Jewish-sponsored charitable trusts in the United States. The university's law school, established in 1912, enrolls roughly 700 students and awards some 200 law degrees each year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
UC San Francisco's Cancer Center has received a $150-million donation from a mysterious benefactor who doesn't want public recognition for the generous act. The donation, which comes in the form of direct grants and an endowment, is by far the largest cash gift ever given to UC San Francisco by a private individual or organization. The money will pay for an expansion of clinical research in which cancer patients are offered experimental treatments.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 1999 | Associated Press
A reported settlement reached between biotech giant Genentech Inc. and UC San Francisco over the patent for the lucrative human growth hormone Protropin is expected to be considered by the UC Board of Regents on Thursday. Associated Press reported over the weekend that the company and UC had agreed to settle their decade-long dispute in which UC accused South San Francisco-based Genentech of stealing a patented DNA molecule and using it to develop Protropin, its top-selling product.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
UC San Francisco has taken over a post-transplant clinic for kidney patients at Kaiser Permanente's San Francisco hospital, bringing to an end Kaiser's brief -- and scandal-plagued -- foray into the organ transplant business. The takeover means that UC doctors now will care for Kaiser's kidney transplant patients before, during and after their surgeries. Kaiser had been caring for about 1,500 patients who had already received transplants. "This is the last piece of the puzzle," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge Wednesday set bail and a Nov. 10 trial date for a man charged with the stabbing death of a Kern County assistant district attorney. Chris Hillis is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Stephen Tauzer, found in his garage in a pool of blood, a knife sticking out of his head, the weekend of Sept. 13, 2002. Hillis has pleaded not guilty. Judge Robert D. Randall ordered Hillis held in lieu of $2.5-million bail. Defense attorney Kyle J. Humphrey had asked for $1-million bond.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In a strongly worded letter to University of California President Richard C. Atkinson, Stanford University President Gerhard Casper has set a deadline of next month for agreement on the proposed merger of the medical centers of UC San Francisco and Stanford, and threatened to call the deal off if his terms are not met. The landmark merger, which would create the largest medical complex in the West, has been under discussion for more than a year.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tobacco Giant Loses Plea on Secret Data: Saying there is strong public interest, a California judge ruled that the University of California, San Francisco may release documents that claim cigarette companies knew for decades that a link existed between smoking and cancer. The university received copies of the documents last summer in an unmarked box. Tobacco company Brown & Williamson claimed the papers were stolen and demanded that they be returned.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Two studies being published today provide encouragement that some of the damaging effects of cholesterol on the heart may be reversible through diet and drugs. Confirming the results of several previous studies of cholesterol in men, UC San Francisco researchers have shown that drug treatment and diet can begin to clear fatty deposits from clogged heart arteries in both sexes.
NEWS
June 8, 1988
UC San Francisco has become the first campus in the University of California system to ban smoking in all of its buildings, school officials said. "As a premier health-science campus, my God, it seemed only appropriate that we take this step," university spokeswoman Jane Norton said. The new policy, phased in during the last three months, prohibits the school's 3,500 graduate students and 6,500 staff and faculty members from lighting up indoors or within 15 feet of building entrances.
NEWS
June 5, 1988
UC Medical Center in San Francisco will spend $1.3 million to expand its radiation safety program and pay the state $25,000 to resolve charges of improper handling of radioactive materials. The state Department of Health Services cited the medical center for the infractions in February, 1987. The settlement clears the way for the state to renew the medical center's license to use radioactive materials for biomedical research and patient care.
SCIENCE
September 13, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
UC San Francisco researcher Renee Reijo Pera has a well-equipped laboratory, generous funding and an ample staff of scientists working to create new lines of embryonic stem cells. She has everything she needs to do cutting-edge work except one thing: fresh human eggs. While the world debates the morality of stem cell research, scientists are grappling with a more basic issue -- a shortage of eggs that they say is crippling their work. "Without eggs, there's no research," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
UC San Francisco agreed Friday to pay $92,500 to settle charges that it mistreated research animals, including allegations it penned them in dirty cages, over-bred monkeys and did not provide enough anesthesia to a sheep during surgery. The U.S. Department of Agriculture charged the university with 61 animal welfare violations in 2004. The university agreed to pay the money, without admitting responsibility, and to comply with the Animal Welfare Act, said university spokeswoman Corinna Kaarlela.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators have accused UC San Francisco researchers of mistreating animals used in experiments over a three-year period. The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued 60 allegations of animal-care violations in a complaint dated Aug. 31, which was made public Tuesday by an animal-rights group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge Wednesday set bail and a Nov. 10 trial date for a man charged with the stabbing death of a Kern County assistant district attorney. Chris Hillis is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Stephen Tauzer, found in his garage in a pool of blood, a knife sticking out of his head, the weekend of Sept. 13, 2002. Hillis has pleaded not guilty. Judge Robert D. Randall ordered Hillis held in lieu of $2.5-million bail. Defense attorney Kyle J. Humphrey had asked for $1-million bond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The University of San Francisco School of Law has received a $3.25-million grant from the Koret Foundation. The money will be used to reconstruct Kendrick Hall, the law school's home for 40 years. The refurbished building will be named the Koret Law Center. The Koret Foundation is one of the largest Jewish-sponsored charitable trusts in the United States. The university's law school, established in 1912, enrolls roughly 700 students and awards some 200 law degrees each year.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending one of the most contentious legal disputes in its history, the University of California Board of Regents on Friday unanimously agreed to a $200-million settlement of a long-running patent infringement case against Genentech Inc. The lump-sum payment is believed to be the largest legal settlement for the university system and includes a $50-million "donation" toward construction of a building to be named by Genentech on UC San Francisco's new Mission Bay research campus.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In an important victory for environmentalists, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that before approving a new project, a public agency must disclose all potential effects and any alternatives that may be less harmful to the environment. The ruling came in the first major environmental case to come before the court since conservatives emerged in the majority last year after the defeat of three liberal justices in the November, 1986, election.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California Board of Regents has decided to pull the plug on the 2-year-old merger of the UC San Francisco and Stanford University hospitals, a bold financial experiment designed to make teaching hospitals profitable that instead has hemorrhaged a million dollars a week in red ink.
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