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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Ask an eclectic group of academicians to ponder California's traffic mess, and what you get are some surprising, provocative, controversial or esoteric results. For instance, there was the study showing that commuters' blood pressure rises and job performance drops after long commutes because of stress. Another proposed fees for drivers who use the freeway during peak periods.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Ask an eclectic group of academicians to ponder California's traffic mess, and what you get are some surprising, provocative, controversial or esoteric results. For instance, there was the study showing that commuters' blood pressure rises and job performance drops after long commutes because of stress. Another proposed fees for drivers who use the freeway during peak periods.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
Thanks for your article on reversible lanes (Street Smart, May 9). However, you should be aware engineers are shifting their thinking toward traffic. Formerly, the model for traffic was a "liquid," where adding capacity relieved congestion. Now engineers are starting to see traffic as a "gas," where traffic volume expands to fill the capacity. Researchers at the University of California Institute for Transportation Studies recently published the results of their study on capacity expansion projects in many California cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The car-pool policy requiring two or more occupants is being violated by 28.5% of the drivers using the high-speed lanes during peak traffic hours on the Costa Mesa Freeway, a grass-roots highway safety group claimed Wednesday. The figures released by the Irvine-based Drivers for Highway Safety differ dramatically from the 6% to 9% violation rates reported by the California Department of Transportation. The private group's findings are based on members' visual counts.
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