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September 4, 1994 | Michael Dorris, Michael Dorris is the author of "A Yellow Raft in Blue Water" and "The Broken Cord." His second novel for young readers, "Guests," will be published this fall
Anthropologists generally agree that before the arrival of Europeans, California, as now, was the most heavily populated area of America north of the Rio Grande. There was no single dominant Native American nation--no League of the Iroquois or Huron Confederacy--but rather a mosaic of distinct and coexistent small cultures, each with its own language and tradition, religion and cosmology. From the Yurok in the north, whose social and economic systems were intricately entwined, to the tiny bands of kin-based bands in the south, indigenous California societies were as diverse as they were numerous, as creatively adaptive to their particular environments as they were artistically and philosophically experimental.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar Stories of Food During Wartime by the World's Leading Correspondents Edited by Matt McAllester University of California Press: 214 pp., $27.50
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
Eating Mud Crabs in Kandahar Stories of Food During Wartime by the World's Leading Correspondents Edited by Matt McAllester University of California Press: 214 pp., $27.50
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2011
Los Angeles in the 1930s The WPA Guide to the City of Angels With an Introduction by David Kipen University of California Press: 504 pp., $24.95.
BOOKS
April 23, 1989 | Jonathan Kirsch
BLACK LIVES, WHITE LIVES Three Decades of Race Relations by Bob Blauner (University of California Press: $25; 350 pp.) "A sociological study with a vivid face and a warm heart. Blauner was clearly won over by the men and women who shared their lives with him and his readers--and so was I."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2011
Los Angeles in the 1930s The WPA Guide to the City of Angels With an Introduction by David Kipen University of California Press: 504 pp., $24.95.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1998
It's good to see that Don Heckman mentions books that deal with jazz on Central Avenue ("Echoes of Central Avenue," July 30). However, he did not mention "California Soul: Music of African Americans in the West," a book recently published by the University of California Press. Co-edited by myself and Eddie Meadows, it contains several articles on Los Angeles jazz, popular music and gospel. J.C. DJEDJE, Los Angeles Allow me to add two items to Heckman's Central Avenue study guide: Harvey Kubernik has produced two spoken-word CDs that document the music and careers of saxophonist Buddy Collette ("A Jazz Audio Biography," on Issues Records)
OPINION
July 14, 2005
Jon Weiner's column, "Chutzpah and Free Speech" (Opinion, July 11), omits important facts. My letter to the University of California Press was precipitated by an e-mail from Norman Finkelstein to the dean of Harvard Law School claiming Finkelstein was writing a book that "will demonstrate that he [Dershowitz] almost certainly didn't write the book ['The Case for Israel'], and perhaps didn't even read it prior to publication." This defamatory claim was followed by Finkelstein comparing me to Adolf Eichmann and asserting that my books are churned out for me "like a Hallmark line for Nazis."
BOOKS
July 9, 1989 | Penny Lernoux
"The seeming complexities of the financial world, which are exaggerated by insider's jargon, have a lot to do with the public's--and Congress'--boredom with the subject. But as Ned Eichler points out in "The Thrift Debacle," it behooves the taxpayer to pay attention because billions of dollars in tax money are being thrown down a black hole to pay for the ongoing follies of greedy gamblers and inept bank regulators."
NEWS
November 4, 2003 | Susan Dworski
Primatologist Frans de Waal takes us to a family reunion, with a photo gallery that captures our closest relatives -- chimpanzees, bonobos, macaques, baboons and dainty New World capuchins -- as they go about their busy, very social, lives. De Waal combines a crisp, insightful text culled from 30 years of fieldwork with 122 arresting photographs that shock us into recognition that these complex, dignified, highly emotional, sexy roustabouts are without doubt our cousins. The eyes say it all.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The 736-page "Autobiography of Mark Twain," published a full 100 years after its author's death, was a surprise bestseller when it came out earlier this month. That's terrific news for the University of California Press, the book's publisher, which says "Autobiography of Mark Twain" is the biggest seller it's ever had. Original plans called for a printing of 7,500, which was increased to 50,000 by the time the book actually went to press. It's since gone back again and again, bringing the total number of printed copies to 275,000.
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | Colin Fleming, Colin Fleming, who writes for the Nation, the New Yorker and the Washington Post, is completing a novel.
THERE was a time when the zeitgeist used to get bashed about pretty thoroughly by classical music. New operas, ballets and symphonies would actually alter the cultural climate, chasing away old modes of thought and introducing new realities -- as in 1913, when Igor Stravinsky dropped his "Rite of Spring" on an ill-prepared Parisian public, or in 1952, when David Tudor sat down and closed his keyboard lid for the first live performance of John Cage's "4' 33"."
BOOKS
November 18, 2007 | Peter Schrag, Peter Schrag, a columnist and former editorial page editor of the Sacramento Bee, is the author, most recently, of "California: America's High Stakes Experiment."
It's been a long time since Jesse M. "Big Daddy" Unruh was a household name in California politics. Unruh was, as the cliche goes, "the powerful speaker" of the state Assembly from 1961 to 1969, candidate for governor in 1970 -- he lost to then-Gov. Ronald Reagan by 500,000 votes -- and state treasurer from 1975 until his death in 1987. So why would anyone want to write Unruh's biography now?
BOOKS
September 23, 2007 | Jim Newton, Jim Newton, The Times' editorial page editor, is the author of "Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made."
Margaret Leslie Davis' ongoing examination of Los Angeles through the lives of its civic and cultural leaders is a grand project, deserving of generous praise. More than any writer of our time, she is methodically supplying this city with an understanding of itself. Davis' devotion to the task is evident in her choice of subjects -- previous biographies were on William Mulholland and Edward Doheny, of water and oil fame and infamy -- and in the rigorous research that is her signature.
BOOKS
September 16, 2007 | Louise Steinman, Louise Steinman, author of "The Souvenir: A Daughter Discovers Her Father's War," is writing a book about Poland.
Ladies and gentlemen! Behold the Human Fly (ludzka mucha in Polish) as he scales the cornerstones of Layzer Mandelbaum's house, then performs three handstands! Take pity on lovely Malkele Drek, who acquired her unfortunate name after falling into a military latrine! Learn how to inflate a goose bladder, stuff a chicken neck and whip up a tasty sauce out of herring sperm! All these wonders (and more!
BOOKS
June 17, 2007 | Bill McKibben, Bill McKibben is the author of "Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future" and an organizer of this spring's Stepitup07.org demonstrations against global warming.
IN one of the best essays in this sterling collection, activist Rebecca Solnit describes Silicon Valley as "a decentralized, diffused region: postindustrial, postcommunal, postrural, and posturban -- postplace." Nothing so new in that observation, but in the pages that follow she explains the reasons that placelessness matters. When there's no there there -- no Bastille to storm -- then confronting power becomes so frustrating that it's easy to just give up and play another round of Doom.
BOOKS
June 23, 1991 | Carol Muske Dukes, Muske Dukes just finished her fifth book of poems, "Red Trousseau," and is finishing her second novel, "Saving St. Germ," for Viking. She teaches in the English department at USC
In the brief but moving introduction to his "Selected Poems," Robert Creeley notes that poet-critic Robert Graves once characterized him as a "domestic poet." This cheerful condescension of Graves' hit an unwitting backhanded critical bull's eye. As Creeley says, "With Robert Duncan I am committed to the hearth and love the echoes of that word. The fire is the center." Fire is indeed the center of this collection of poems, and the conflagrations are domestic and wild.
BOOKS
March 19, 2006 | Anthony Day, Anthony Day, former editor of The Times' editorial pages, is a contributing writer to Book Review.
THE Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus, who lived his short life in the tumultuous last years of the Roman republic, wrote some of the loveliest lyric poetry in the Latin language. Some of it was sweet and joyful, the rest moving and sad, singing to us of the poet's ancestral homeland; the love of a mistress; the death of a dear brother; the goddess Diana, revered by the Romans as the embodiment of hunting and healing.
BOOKS
May 20, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author of 11 books including, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
ONE of the wry passages in "Weimar on the Pacific" by Ehrhard Bahr is an entry in the journal that Thomas Mann kept while living in Los Angeles in the 1940s and early 1950s. The great man of German letters, a Nobel laureate who served as the public conscience of German civilization in the face of Nazi barbarism, was somehow moved to preserve the following observation: "Nach Westwood zum Haarschneiden" ("Gone to Westwood for a haircut").
HOME & GARDEN
March 1, 2007 | Lili Singer
These are the words of a garden dreamer -- joyful, hopeful, yet down to earth and brimming with horticultural smarts. The author, a Marin County seed proprietor and landscape consultant, is restoring a 1 1/4 -acre garden and 80 acres of third-growth forest. Her book, also due out next month, shares what she sees and how she listens. "Let our gardens school us," she says. Because the short chapters were written as separate essays, there's some redundancy.
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