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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2009 | Larry Gordon
Rallies, walkouts and teach-ins are scheduled today across the University of California system, with professors, students and staff expected to protest state cutbacks in higher education funding and UC's handling of the crisis. The extent of the protests was hard to predict; many faculty and students said they were reluctant to skip classes today, the first day of fall classes for the seven undergraduate UC campuses on the quarter calendar. But large turnouts were expected at lunchtime rallies at many of the system's 10 campuses, fueled by anger over pay cuts, rising student fees and reduced class offerings.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Foreign-born inventors are responsible for more than three-quarters of the patents that emerged from top American research universities last year, according to a new report. The Partnership for a New American Economy, a bipartisan nonprofit group composed of hundreds of mayors and business leaders and co-chaired by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, released the report Tuesday as part of its effort to reform immigration policies. The report is based on a study of 1,466 patents from the country's top 10 patent-generating schools, including the University of California system, Stanford and Caltech.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992
San Diegans should breathe a collective sigh of relief that Richard Atkinson was passed over as president of the University of California system. His very considerable intellectual and academic leadership talents would have been badly wasted in a position that is essentially political in nature. Intellectual and academic leadership in the University of California system is provided not by the president's office, but by the chancellors of the individual campuses. In Atkinson, San Diego has, by far, the best of the current crop of UC chancellors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Sharply higher numbers of students from other states and countries applied for admission to the University of California this year, following UC's controversial efforts to recruit more such students for the extra tuition they pay, according to a report released Thursday. At the same time, UC administrators said a new policy that reduced the standardized testing requirements for admission appears to have encouraged more Californians than ever to apply to the university system. The number of non-Californians seeking to become UC freshmen in fall 2012 rose 56% over last year to about 33,000, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992
What a wonderful idea, asking the University of California system to shed its "elitist" image. Finally, we realize what an abomination it is for our state to have a public university that has the gall to strive for greatness, to rival places like Harvard, Stanford or Princeton. How dare publicly supported universities rank in the top 10 academically? I am a UCLA alumnus. For Pete's sake, hang on to what you have. It's great. ROSS DURHAM, Chattanooga, Tenn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Howard B. Shontz, former director of admissions at the University of California, died Tuesday at Alta Bates Hospital in Berkeley. He was 70. In 1963, he was named director of admissions for the University of California system and in 1965 became assistant chancellor at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1973, he went to UC Berkeley as the director of relations with schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2001
Re "Superintendent Counters a Critic" (Dec. 31): Supt. Susan Roper's reason that the Huntington Beach Union High School District did not send transcripts to the state of the top 4% in each class was that 53% of the seniors in the district were eligible to attend the University of California system without using the program. There is a quantum leap between being eligible and being admitted. Many students are eligible but few are admitted--a ratio of about 10 to 1. So her statement, "Our graduates are not affected by the 4% admission guarantee since a much higher percentage of our students are already eligible for admission to the UC system" is fallacious.
OPINION
February 25, 2001
Re "Looking Beyond the SAT," editorial, Feb. 21: My spouse taught in the University of California system for 10 years. This year he is teaching at a university in another state. He is shocked at the high level of the "out of state" students compared to his UC students. Even though this college is in a depressed area and the student body is less middle class, they are far better educated than their middle-class UC counterparts. And to his joy, they are incredibly enthusiastic about learning.
NEWS
April 13, 1989
The percentage of Asian students at UC Irvine is now the highest of any campus in the University of California system, university officials announced. The percentage has risen from 15% in 1980 to 33.5% last fall. Officials said the numbers of Chicano and Latino students have also grown during that period, but their share of the undergraduate population has remained little changed--about 8%. Blacks have actually declined in percentage, from 3.5% in 1980 to 2.7% in fall, 1988. In its Asian undergraduate enrollment, the Irvine campus has moved well ahead of Berkeley, where the percentage is 26% and where Chancellor Michael Heyman last week publicly apologized for admission policies that resulted in fewer qualified Asians.
OPINION
September 7, 2006
Re "New Version of SAT Brings Lower Scores in U.S., California," Aug. 30 You omit some facts. First, the University of California system in 2001 threatened to abandon the SAT. It is widely acknowledged that this threat alone precipitated the revision of the SAT to the new format -- one for which the written section scoring rubric is arguably both arbitrary and poorly administered. Second, at UCLA, African American and other minority application and enrollment rates for this fall are at lows not seen since the 1970s.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
A contract dispute between one of California's largest health insurers and UCLA could force thousands of patients at the university's medical centers to seek treatment elsewhere if the disagreement is not resolved by the end of December. Executives from Blue Shield of California and the University of California's health system are quarreling over reimbursement rates for medical treatment at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Westwood and nearby Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital.
OPINION
April 17, 2011 | By Gene Block
Early this year I was asked, as the chancellor at UCLA, to prepare the campus for nearly $100 million in budget cuts. It was our share of the $500-million reduction proposed for the University of California system in Gov. Jerry Brown's budget proposal. And that's the good news. As we all know, more extreme reductions lie ahead because of the state's budgetary crisis and political stalemate. The governor has attempted to forestall those further reductions by asking voters to approve extensions of several state taxes, taxes that Californians already pay. Thus far, there are not enough legislators to support putting the extensions up for a vote on the June ballot.
OPINION
February 23, 2011 | By Peter Baldwin
In both of the two most respected global rankings of universities, the University of California system supplies at least 10% of the top 50 institutions worldwide. In the Academic Ranking of World Universities put out by Shanghai Jiao Tong University (usually referred to as the Shanghai index), seven of the UC's 10 campuses rank in the top 50. In Britain's Times Higher Education World University Rankings, the UC system has five campuses in the top 50 with a sixth four notches lower. This is an extraordinary achievement for a publicly financed system of higher education, particularly for one that was founded just a century ago. If we add in the three private California universities (Caltech, USC and Stanford)
OPINION
July 26, 2010 | By Gary Fethke and Andrew Policano
The Times' July 20 editorial, " UC gets smarter about cuts, applauds the efforts of the University of California system to boost revenues by increasing enrollment of higher-paying out-of-state students. While providing desperately needed funds in the short run, this strategy is essentially a "beggar thy neighbor" policy applied to public education; that is, an attempt to recruit "outsiders" to pay for the void created by declining local support. The politically driven scenario to maintain low resident tuition and enroll nonresident students leads to a fascinating paradox.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
The University of California system is one of America's greatest public institutions. There is virtually no significant branch of human knowledge that has not benefited from its scholarship. It is, at once, a great engine of this state's long-term prosperity and a continuing affirmation of our common belief that equality of opportunity is more than just an altruistic impulse. Like so many other public institutions, it also is passing through an unparalleled financial crisis. Draconian cuts in the budget allocation the university receives from Sacramento have left the system $1 billion short of what it needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2009 | Larry Gordon
Rallies, walkouts and teach-ins are scheduled today across the University of California system, with professors, students and staff expected to protest state cutbacks in higher education funding and UC's handling of the crisis. The extent of the protests was hard to predict; many faculty and students said they were reluctant to skip classes today, the first day of fall classes for the seven undergraduate UC campuses on the quarter calendar. But large turnouts were expected at lunchtime rallies at many of the system's 10 campuses, fueled by anger over pay cuts, rising student fees and reduced class offerings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1995
CSUN Professor Robert Oliphant writes (Valley Commentary, Jan. 29): ". . . there is reason to think brighter students prefer a community college for the first two years of higher education: It's a lot less expensive." On Feb. 5, The Times published a supplement entitled "Campus and Careers Guide." The 12-page supplement included articles, cost comparisons and paid advertising space regarding private colleges and universities, the California State University system and the University of California system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993
In response to "UC May Revive Plans for Campus in Central California" (July 16) and "UC Will Resume Site Search for a San Joaquin Campus" (July 17), regarding the UC system building a new (10th) campus: I cannot believe that all of a sudden the University of California system has "found" $1.5 million to fund an environmental impact report after UC officials have already spent $4 million searching for a site! It's ludicrous in this depression to even think about spending on unnecessary projects.
OPINION
May 27, 2008 | Judy Olian, Judy Olian is the dean of UCLA's Anderson School of Management.
In the 21st century, corporate headquarters are generally shadows of their former selves. Having shed most functions to their operating units, they manage risk by holding unit heads accountable against measurable results. Because the UC system is made up of outstanding but vastly different campuses and national labs, one size does not fit all. Each of these "operating units" has terrific leaders who understand their unique market conditions and competitive pressures inside and out, and each should be given maximum flexibility to excel.
OPINION
September 7, 2006
Re "New Version of SAT Brings Lower Scores in U.S., California," Aug. 30 You omit some facts. First, the University of California system in 2001 threatened to abandon the SAT. It is widely acknowledged that this threat alone precipitated the revision of the SAT to the new format -- one for which the written section scoring rubric is arguably both arbitrary and poorly administered. Second, at UCLA, African American and other minority application and enrollment rates for this fall are at lows not seen since the 1970s.
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