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SPORTS
March 29, 2009 | Mike Anthony
It wasn't a short, sweet, four-game, two-week trip to college basketball's grand stage. It wasn't as simple as winning two games in Philadelphia, two more in Arizona, throwing on some hats, doing a few dances, grabbing a trophy and moving on to Detroit. But Connecticut, single-minded and tenacious, is back in the Final Four for the third time. On Saturday afternoon at cavernous University of Phoenix Stadium, the top-seeded Huskies outlasted No.
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NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
The University of Connecticut's fleet is short one remote-controlled submarine. The submarine, insured for $71,100, sank in 378 feet of water on Dec. 9 off the island of Molokai in Hawaii when its control cable snapped, officials said. The submarine, measuring about 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet, is "essentially a camera with some motors on it," Peter J. Auster of the university's National Undersea Research Center said Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 7, 2008 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
TAMPA, Fla. -- Candice Wiggins put her name in the record books with her scoring ability this season. She lifted the Stanford women's basketball team into the NCAA finals by excelling across the board. Wiggins scored a team-high 25 points Sunday afternoon against top-seeded Connecticut, but it was also her rebounding and ballhandling abilities that made the difference in the 82-73 victory at the St.
SPORTS
January 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Sophomore point guard Ricky Moore and senior center Kirk King, both two-year starters for the University of Connecticut, were declared ineligible Thursday amid allegations they accepted improper gifts. The university and the Big East Conference agreed that Moore and King would not play until all questions are answered regarding the allegations. The university and the Big East did not identify the gifts. Published reports Thursday said King and Moore had accepted airplane tickets in 1995.
SPORTS
February 27, 1998 | Associated Press
Connecticut women's basketball Coach Geno Auriemma simply wanted a happy ending. Now the story won't go away. Auriemma assailed the media Thursday for their criticism of the staged shot that allowed a hobbled Nykesha Sales to set a school career scoring record Tuesday night, prompting a debate about the integrity of women's basketball. "You guys just want a freaking story, and I gave you something to write about for two days," Auriemma said during a conference call. "We're feeding the fire.
SPORTS
December 29, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the University of Connecticut hired its new head football coach last week, Notre Dame's Lou Holtz gave him his blessing and three pieces of advice: "Surround yourself with people who care about the end result. "Be yourself. Don't be me. "Don't call collect." Skip Holtz, who has served on his father's coaching staff for four seasons, the last two as offensive coordinator, is certain he can master the first two, especially the second. He knows not even one magic trick.
SPORTS
July 31, 1993 | OWEN CANFIELD, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Pat Calhoun is no less devastated than her husband, University of Connecticut Coach Jim Calhoun, by the death of Boston Celtics captain Reggie Lewis. It is like a death in the family. Luckily, she is a strong woman who can help her husband along as he helps her. When the coach-player relationship becomes as special and binding as this one, which is seldom, the families of both are inextricably involved. Today, the Calhoun family is grieving right along with the Lewis family.
SPORTS
November 16, 2005 | Diane Pucin
Jim Calhoun brought a prop, a University of Connecticut student newspaper. With his finger, he pointed to a front-page column. With the conciseness of a writing instructor, Calhoun summarized the subject. Get off Calhoun's back. As the No. 3-ranked Huskies arrive in Southern California for a Friday game against Pepperdine, Connecticut's coach is still facing the repercussions of a summer of trouble for two of his key players. Point guards A.J.
SPORTS
November 19, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cold New England wind rides through north central Connecticut, scattering yellow leaves and sending the unmistakable message that winter is close behind. Students on the University of Connecticut campus bundle up against the cold as they walk stiffly into the wind. Heads covered, hands shoved deep into pockets of bulky jackets, they make their way to class.
SPORTS
March 25, 2006 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
After lapse upon lapse in this NCAA tournament, Connecticut was seemingly down to its very last gasp. On the verge of being upset by Washington, Connecticut showed why this team laden with NBA-caliber talent is still the favorite to win the NCAA championship. It took an off-balance three-pointer with 1.8 seconds left in regulation by Rashad Anderson to get Connecticut to overtime.
SPORTS
March 25, 2006 | J.A. Adande
The tightest matchup in an NCAA tournament round filled with tight games is the top-seeded Connecticut Huskies against themselves and their coach, a constant battle to survive their own mistakes and advance. They will play another game, against George Mason if not each other, after drawing their tournament lives to the last seconds, tempting fate and the limits of Jim Calhoun's patience.
SPORTS
November 16, 2005 | Diane Pucin
Jim Calhoun brought a prop, a University of Connecticut student newspaper. With his finger, he pointed to a front-page column. With the conciseness of a writing instructor, Calhoun summarized the subject. Get off Calhoun's back. As the No. 3-ranked Huskies arrive in Southern California for a Friday game against Pepperdine, Connecticut's coach is still facing the repercussions of a summer of trouble for two of his key players. Point guards A.J.
SPORTS
April 7, 2004 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Connecticut made it look easy on a Monday night in April. It wasn't always that way from November to early March. The Huskies' second NCAA championship will be remembered because Connecticut went from preseason No. 1 to an easy winner over Georgia Tech in the title game. But only two of the last 12 champions have lost more games than the Huskies, who finished 33-6. Michigan State lost seven in 2000, and Arizona lost nine in 1997.
SPORTS
April 6, 2004 | Lonnie White
CONNECTICUT (33-6) Coach: Jim Calhoun CONNECTICUT 70, VERMONT 53 March 18, first round at Buffalo Vermont's Taylor Coppenrath, the nation's third-leading scorer at 24.7 points per game, was held to three-of-17 shooting and 12 points, and Rashad Anderson scored 22 points to lead the Huskies. CONNECTICUT 72, DEPAUL 55 March 20, second round at Buffalo DePaul missed its first 10 shots, and Connecticut raced to a huge lead and never looked back, with Ben Gordon scoring a team-high 18 points.
SPORTS
April 6, 2004 | Mike Terry, Times Staff Writer
Those tuning in to tonight's Connecticut-Tennessee basketball game to determine the 2004 NCAA women's Division I championship may think they're watching the History Channel. These longtime and occasionally bitter rivals played for the NCAA title last year, and this will be the fourth time since 1995 that they have met in the national final. The Huskies and Lady Vols know each other as well as two teams can. And they are as compatible as grits and clam chowder.
SPORTS
March 26, 2002 | Diane Pucin
There is symmetrical beauty about a basketball fastbreak. There are angles to be negotiated, a choreography of five players, 10 feet, 10 hands, one basketball, all needing to travel 94 feet while moving past five other players and their 10 feet and 10 hands. And the goal is to put the basketball into the basket. The University of Connecticut women run the fastbreak better than any college team right now. They ran one Monday night against Old Dominion and the ball touched all five Huskies but never touched the floor.
SPORTS
January 18, 1999 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sudden clearing, the woods part. This is it? The capital of college basketball? Here? Not too many stores in Storrs. No movie theater, no McDonald's. Lord knows, no Gap or Banana Republic. "A Subway, a Blimpie, a Dairy Mart, that's about it. That's all we have," said Shea Ralph, a guard on the No. 2-ranked women's team. "There are tons of other schools you could go to. To come here, you have to know how to make your own fun. This is our fun."
SPORTS
April 6, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
Carmelo Anthony can give it back now, OK? Freshmen shouldn't have it. Kids don't deserve it. The mantle of Final Four hero was returned to a more appropriate owner Monday, snatched away by a student who will wear it this spring under his cap and gown. The tournament's most outstanding player award went to a guy who stayed at Connecticut long enough to learn how to spell it.
SPORTS
April 6, 2004 | Lonnie White
EMEKA OKAFOR Connecticut, Jr., Center FIRST ROUND VS. VERMONT 15 points, 14 rebounds Taylor Coppenrath scored five points against freshman Josh Boone and Vermont led, 7-0, before Connecticut switched Okafor over to defend the high-scoring forward. Okafor dominated the game and the Huskies won going away. SECOND ROUND VS. DEPAUL 10 points, 12 rebounds Okafor made his presence felt early with a couple of inside baskets and intimidating defense around the basket.
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