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NEWS
September 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
An all-white sorority accused of rejecting a black woman because of her race has been suspended by the University of Georgia, where the grand antebellum Greek houses that line Milledge Avenue remain bastions of racial exclusivity nearly 40 years after the school was integrated. The Alpha Gamma Delta chapter cannot conduct social or recruitment activities while the organization and university investigate why the unidentified black woman was rejected.
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SPORTS
November 29, 2009 | By Mark Medina
From Michael Vick's involvement with dog fighting to Tony Gonzalez posing nude for an anti-fur ad, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals hasn't had trouble staying involved with sports. After the death of Uga VII, the University of Georgia's bulldog mascot, PETA requested to Georgia Athletic Director Damon Evans that the school use either an animatronic or a costumed mascot. "Like other dogs, bulldogs love to run and play, but their compromised respiratory system causes these playful animals to struggle for breath," wrote Desiree Acholla, the animal rights group's specialist in animals that are used in entertainment.
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NATIONAL
April 26, 2009 | Associated Press
Authorities were on a nationwide manhunt Saturday for a University of Georgia professor in the shooting deaths of three people, including his ex-wife, at a community theater near campus. Athens-Clarke County Police Capt. Clarence Holeman said authorities were searching for a suspect, 57-year-old George Zinkhan, who has been a marketing professor at the university in Athens since the 1990s, and lived about seven miles from campus.
SPORTS
January 18, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Doctors said that results of an autopsy to determine what caused 20-year-old Thomas Eric Curry, a walk-on football player at the University of Georgia, to die after his first workout won't be known for several days.
SPORTS
January 3, 1989
The University of Georgia, which was rebuffed by its first two choices, Monday named assistant coach Ray Goff, a former Bulldog quarterback, to replace Vince Dooley as head football coach. "Everybody has goals and dreams, and there's no doubt that this has always been a goal of mine," Goff said. "I never thought it would come true." Goff, 33, has served on the Georgia staff since 1981, and he coached the running backs the last three years. Goff, a native of Moultrie, Ga.
SPORTS
January 2, 2006 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
There are a lot of things that seem as if they don't quite belong at this Sugar Bowl, displaced from New Orleans because of Hurricane Katrina. There was the Mardi Gras-style parade down Peachtree Street on New Year's Eve, a small but earnest attempt to bring a little bit of the Big Easy to Atlanta. There is the game itself, tonight in the Georgia Dome instead of the damaged Louisiana Superdome.
SPORTS
June 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
The NCAA gave Georgia a rare basketball victory Friday, restoring three men's scholarships that were taken away after the scandal that forced the removal of Jim Harrick as coach. Initially, the Bulldogs were stripped of one scholarship for each of the 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08 seasons as part of their four-year probation. The school acknowledged that academic fraud occurred in a sham class taught by Harrick's son, assistant coach Jim Harrick Jr., but appealed the seriousness of the penalties.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2004 | Jenny Jarvie and Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writers
A federal judge on Monday denied an appeal for reinstatement by a University of Georgia cheerleading coach accused of mingling religion with team activities. Marilou Braswell was fired in August, according to university officials, for retaliating against a Jewish cheerleader who had complained about pressure to participate in Bible study and team prayers. The case has drawn attention to sports in Georgia, where coaches often lead players in prayer or worship.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2004 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Almost five years after the University of Georgia eliminated race as a factor in its admissions decisions, a faculty committee has recommended reinstating it in hopes of enrolling more black students. Since an appeals court ruling in favor of three white women who were denied admission, the university has selected college freshmen purely on the basis of academic performance. That period has seen the percentage of black incoming freshmen drop from between 5.5% and 7% to a low this year of 4.5%.
BOOKS
March 21, 2004 | Timothy Liu
Time will erode our darkest memories as faces of ex-lovers start to fade. Nothing to hide, we lie beneath the trees and linger in some surreptitious breeze where kisses are blown to the edge of shade. Time will erode our fondest memories as angels descend with vials of disease to infect the love our bodies have made. No place to hide, we kneel before the trees and offer prayers in vain.
SPORTS
September 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Jim Harrick is back in basketball, hired Monday by the Denver Nuggets as a scout and coaching consultant. Harrick was forced to resign as Georgia's coach in March amid accusations of improper payments to players and academic fraud. That scandal, which led Georgia to pull out of postseason play, was the latest in a series that followed Harrick on nearly every step of his 23-year career as a college coach.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Charlayne Hunter-Gault, one of the two black students who first integrated the University of Georgia in 1961, returned to the campus here Saturday to chalk up another first. Hunter-Gault, national correspondent for the McNeil/Lehrer NewsHour, became the first black speaker to deliver the commencement address at the northeastern Georgia university in its 185-year history.
SPORTS
November 29, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Room 410 in the English building at the University of Georgia seems drab enough to induce inertia. The concrete-block walls, windowless, are painted a dull yellow. There are no desks, only long rows of tables with chairs bolted to the floor. It does not seem to be a creative atmosphere for a remedial writing course. Just the same, a lively discussion has been engaged, concerning the impending final exam and a standardized basic English test required of all students by the state board of regents.
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Kate Manning, Kate Manning is the author of "Whitegirl," a novel about the marriage of a white woman and a black man.
Jungle fever. Nighttime integration. Mongrelization. Deviance. Rape. Depravity. These are some of the ways Americans in our history have described love and sex between African Americans and European Americans, harsh testimony to the fact that, until recently, intimacy across the color line was a transgression, and any discussion of it was hushed and shamed, sensationalized or fraught with danger, especially for black people.
SPORTS
March 11, 2003 | J.A. Adande
Was it worth it? That's the question that Jim Harrick, like so many other people around college basketball, must be wondering after another messy day for the sport. Does anyone still buy the notion that the difference between the NBA and the NCAA is that the college kids play for the name on the front of the jersey, not the back? College athletes have less to do with the campus than the school's custodial staff. At least the janitors set foot in the classrooms.
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