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NEWS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
A student upset about not getting an academic honor shot four persons to death Friday at the University of Iowa before fatally shooting himself, a school official said. The dead included faculty members and the student who had won the honor. Two others were critically wounded, authorities said. The gunman was identified as Gang Lu, a graduate student in physics from China, Ann Rhodes, vice president of university affairs, said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2009
Dave Treen Ex-governor of Louisiana Dave Treen, 81, who in 1979 became the first Republican governor of Louisiana since Reconstruction but lost a reelection bid to the controversial Democrat Edwin Edwards four years later, died Thursday of complications from a respiratory illness, said his son David Treen Jr. Treen did not have to face Edwards in 1979 because the popular governor couldn't run for three consecutive terms. Treen defeated Louis Lambert but lost in a landslide four years later to Edwards, who is serving a 10-year sentence for trying to rig the riverboat casino licensing process during his fourth term.
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SPORTS
December 4, 1990
A major snowstorm destroyed the University of Iowa's $2.1-million plastic-like dome that covered its football practice facility, leaving the team without a covered field to practice on as it prepares for the Rose Bowl. To repair the dome, crews will have to wait until temperatures warm to at least 50 degrees for the fabric to be pliable.
NATIONAL
August 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The state has agreed to pay $925,000 to unwitting subjects of an infamous 1930s stuttering experiment -- orphans who were badgered and belittled as children by University of Iowa researchers trying to induce speech impediments. Johnson County District Court Judge Denver Dillard issued an order approving the settlement, which still must be ratified by the State Appeal Board. The six plaintiffs said the experiment left lifelong psychological and emotional scars.
SPORTS
February 26, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Acie Earl, the University of Iowa's leading scorer and rebounder, pleaded innocent to a charge of simple assault filed by a 17-year-old girl, who said she wants the charge dropped. Earl, a 6-foot-10 sophomore, was charged late Sunday morning after an altercation with the girl.
NATIONAL
August 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The state has agreed to pay $925,000 to unwitting subjects of an infamous 1930s stuttering experiment -- orphans who were badgered and belittled as children by University of Iowa researchers trying to induce speech impediments. Johnson County District Court Judge Denver Dillard issued an order approving the settlement, which still must be ratified by the State Appeal Board. The six plaintiffs said the experiment left lifelong psychological and emotional scars.
SPORTS
February 6, 1989
Three University of Iowa basketball players were enrolled in drug treatment programs last summer at a cost of more than $16,000, according to the Des Moines Sunday Register. University officials, citing a federal statute and confidentiality policies, refused to identify the players, and Coach Tom Davis declined to comment. The treatment took place in August and September at the Hanley Hazelden drug and alcohol treatment center in West Palm Beach, Fla.
SPORTS
January 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Quarterback Dan McGwire on Tuesday said he will not return to the University of Iowa for the spring semester because of dissatisfaction with the Hawkeye football program. "I'm just very unhappy back there, and I'm just glad to get out," McGwire said by telephone from his home in Claremont, Calif. McGwire, a sophomore, said he wants to transfer to San Diego State, where he would have to sit out a year before being eligible. "I made contact with SDSU. SDSU made no contact with me.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
The hot-pink toilet seat covers imprinted with the Hawkeye football mascot sold out weeks ago. Gone, too, are the blush-colored sun visors, the ladies' rose-toned underwear, the mauve-stained coffee cups and the salmon-tinted baby clothes. But there are plenty of T-shirts for football fans in bubble-gum hues, with slogans such as "Locker Room Defense Fund" and "Give That Academia Nut Her Pink Slip."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lan Samantha Chang, a Harvard University professor and award-winning fiction author who specializes in stories of Chinese Americans, has been named director of the nation's most prestigious writing program, the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. A student at Iowa in the 1990s and later a teacher there, Chang succeeds Frank Conroy, the longtime director who announced last summer that he was retiring and died of cancer last week, at 69.
SPORTS
February 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Iowa basketball star Pierre Pierce was kicked off the team Wednesday while under investigation by West Des Moines police for intent to commit sexual abuse, burglary and other crimes at the home of a former girlfriend. The 21-year-old Pierce, who averaged 17.8 points this season, met for more than two hours Wednesday with investigators who are considering whether to file criminal charges against the junior guard, Pierce's attorney, Alfredo Parrish said.
BOOKS
May 30, 2004 | Dan Neil, Dan Neil is The Times' automotive critic. He was awarded the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for criticism.
In the not-too-distant future, billboards may become obsolete, replaced by holographic advertisements projected onto car windshields by the vehicles' own "enhanced vision" systems -- a technology that will allow drivers to see, for instance, movie starting times superimposed over theaters they pass, or lunch specials available at a restaurant. These airy figments of virtual shilling will know you better than you know yourself.
BOOKS
December 21, 2003 | Robert Finch, Robert Finch is the co-editor with John Elder of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" and the author of several books, including "Common Ground: A Naturalist's Cape Cod" and "Death of a Hornet."
One of the things that has helped to make nature writing such a vigorous and elastic genre of nonfiction is that it has been, for most of its history, something of an outlaw category, uncanonized and unclassifiable, free to borrow and infuse itself with elements from other, more established kinds. When John Elder and I co-edited the first edition of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" in 1990, the irony of creating something of a formal definition and canon was not lost on us.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | David Waltner-Toews
We speak with voices neither of men nor angels. We speak with the ephemeral complexity of electrons, a conversation of sand castles, articulating perplexity, retreating to a sigh of candy wrappers, pop cans, foam and kelp-litter, scraps of garbage information, dissimulation, thoughts for gulls to squabble over. And as the sea sucks back, a crab, incredible, unthinking, hard quotidian experience, a wonder of survival, scuttles over the traces of our castles.
SPORTS
February 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Iowa basketball star Pierre Pierce was kicked off the team Wednesday while under investigation by West Des Moines police for intent to commit sexual abuse, burglary and other crimes at the home of a former girlfriend. The 21-year-old Pierce, who averaged 17.8 points this season, met for more than two hours Wednesday with investigators who are considering whether to file criminal charges against the junior guard, Pierce's attorney, Alfredo Parrish said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lan Samantha Chang, a Harvard University professor and award-winning fiction author who specializes in stories of Chinese Americans, has been named director of the nation's most prestigious writing program, the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. A student at Iowa in the 1990s and later a teacher there, Chang succeeds Frank Conroy, the longtime director who announced last summer that he was retiring and died of cancer last week, at 69.
BOOKS
January 12, 2003 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price writes frequently for Newsday, the Chicago Tribune and the San Francisco Chronicle.
Like novelists George Orwell and Arthur Koestler, vagabond writer and radical Victor Serge was a seminal witness to the catastrophes of totalitarianism. But today Serge is undoubtedly the least known of the three. The economics of publishing have been not kind to Serge: "The Case of Comrade Tulayev," his great novel of Stalin's purges, has long been out of print, as has his most remarkable work, "Memoirs of a Revolutionary." (My battered, disintegrating copy is held together by a rubber band).
SPORTS
January 2, 2003 | Rob Fernas, Times Staff Writer
Iowa fullback Edgar Cervantes grew up in Southern California, so it's understandable that he wasn't familiar with bitterly cold Midwest winters when he took his recruiting trip in December 1998. When his plane landed in Cedar Rapids on that frosty day, Cervantes was dressed in T-shirt and shorts. "It was pretty cold," he recalled. "I came off the airplane and coaches were waiting for me with a jacket, so they knew what to expect." Cervantes, of course, had no clue what to expect.
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