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FOOD
July 9, 1992 | ANNE MENDELSON
Browse around a bookstore catering to cookbook fanatics or a big library that keeps up with the field, and you're likely to find quite a few facsimile reprints and scholarly editions. Every year seems to swell the ranks of libraries interested in this literature and knowledgeable editors or historians willing to map out unfamiliar culinary/cultural terrain for would-be learners. Some of the grist to this mill comes from donations of major private collections to scholarly libraries.
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BOOKS
May 30, 2004 | Dan Neil, Dan Neil is The Times' automotive critic. He was awarded the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for criticism.
In the not-too-distant future, billboards may become obsolete, replaced by holographic advertisements projected onto car windshields by the vehicles' own "enhanced vision" systems -- a technology that will allow drivers to see, for instance, movie starting times superimposed over theaters they pass, or lunch specials available at a restaurant. These airy figments of virtual shilling will know you better than you know yourself.
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BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | David Waltner-Toews
We speak with voices neither of men nor angels. We speak with the ephemeral complexity of electrons, a conversation of sand castles, articulating perplexity, retreating to a sigh of candy wrappers, pop cans, foam and kelp-litter, scraps of garbage information, dissimulation, thoughts for gulls to squabble over. And as the sea sucks back, a crab, incredible, unthinking, hard quotidian experience, a wonder of survival, scuttles over the traces of our castles.
BOOKS
December 21, 2003 | Robert Finch, Robert Finch is the co-editor with John Elder of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" and the author of several books, including "Common Ground: A Naturalist's Cape Cod" and "Death of a Hornet."
One of the things that has helped to make nature writing such a vigorous and elastic genre of nonfiction is that it has been, for most of its history, something of an outlaw category, uncanonized and unclassifiable, free to borrow and infuse itself with elements from other, more established kinds. When John Elder and I co-edited the first edition of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" in 1990, the irony of creating something of a formal definition and canon was not lost on us.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New developments concerning the National Endowment for the Arts--including a personnel crisis that led to the ouster of its No. 2 official, and new actions by influential cultural institutions protesting obscenity restrictions--combined over the weekend to intensify pressures on the beleaguered agency. Among the developments: * NEA sources confirmed Sunday morning that Alvin S. Felzenberg, the endowment's second highest administrator who assumed his job only this past Feb.
FOOD
September 1, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN
When I lived in Iowa during graduate school, my friend Alan would bring me pheasants to cook. Never having eaten or cooked pheasant while growing up in California, I went through cookbooks looking for recipes. Luckily, I found the section on game in "James Beard's American Cooking." Because Alan skinned--rather than plucked--the pheasants, I learned to drape bacon over the breasts or wrap the birds in butter-soaked cheesecloth to keep them from drying out while roasting.
BOOKS
December 21, 2003 | Robert Finch, Robert Finch is the co-editor with John Elder of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" and the author of several books, including "Common Ground: A Naturalist's Cape Cod" and "Death of a Hornet."
One of the things that has helped to make nature writing such a vigorous and elastic genre of nonfiction is that it has been, for most of its history, something of an outlaw category, uncanonized and unclassifiable, free to borrow and infuse itself with elements from other, more established kinds. When John Elder and I co-edited the first edition of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing" in 1990, the irony of creating something of a formal definition and canon was not lost on us.
BOOKS
April 12, 1992 | Douglas Glover, Glover's most recent book, "A Guide to Animal Behavior," was nominated for the 1991 Governor-General's Award for Fiction, Canada's highest literary prize
Albert E. Stone, in his foreword to "Black Eagle Child," calls this book an experimental autobiography. But the reader quickly discovers two things: This tale is not factual--it is full of composite characters and fictionalized events--and it is only tangentially about its author, the Mesquakie Indian poet Ray A. Young Bear, who eventually disappears behind a series of changed names, false leads, alter egos, digressions, epi-stories and myths.
BOOKS
January 12, 2003 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price writes frequently for Newsday, the Chicago Tribune and the San Francisco Chronicle.
Like novelists George Orwell and Arthur Koestler, vagabond writer and radical Victor Serge was a seminal witness to the catastrophes of totalitarianism. But today Serge is undoubtedly the least known of the three. The economics of publishing have been not kind to Serge: "The Case of Comrade Tulayev," his great novel of Stalin's purges, has long been out of print, as has his most remarkable work, "Memoirs of a Revolutionary." (My battered, disintegrating copy is held together by a rubber band).
BOOKS
March 31, 1991 | John Espey, Espey's current book is "Strong Drink, Strong Language," reminiscences beginning with his youth in China
In 1907, no one would have thought it necessary before the end of the century to do more than mention Rudyard Kipling's name in order to gain instant recognition of one of the English-speaking world's most accomplished short-story writers, the author of "Kim," one of the earliest and best novels of Indian life, and the two "Jungle Books." For it was in 1907 that Kipling received the Nobel Prize for Literature. But Kipling always has presented something of a problem to literary historians.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | David Waltner-Toews
We speak with voices neither of men nor angels. We speak with the ephemeral complexity of electrons, a conversation of sand castles, articulating perplexity, retreating to a sigh of candy wrappers, pop cans, foam and kelp-litter, scraps of garbage information, dissimulation, thoughts for gulls to squabble over. And as the sea sucks back, a crab, incredible, unthinking, hard quotidian experience, a wonder of survival, scuttles over the traces of our castles.
BOOKS
January 12, 2003 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price writes frequently for Newsday, the Chicago Tribune and the San Francisco Chronicle.
Like novelists George Orwell and Arthur Koestler, vagabond writer and radical Victor Serge was a seminal witness to the catastrophes of totalitarianism. But today Serge is undoubtedly the least known of the three. The economics of publishing have been not kind to Serge: "The Case of Comrade Tulayev," his great novel of Stalin's purges, has long been out of print, as has his most remarkable work, "Memoirs of a Revolutionary." (My battered, disintegrating copy is held together by a rubber band).
FOOD
September 1, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN
When I lived in Iowa during graduate school, my friend Alan would bring me pheasants to cook. Never having eaten or cooked pheasant while growing up in California, I went through cookbooks looking for recipes. Luckily, I found the section on game in "James Beard's American Cooking." Because Alan skinned--rather than plucked--the pheasants, I learned to drape bacon over the breasts or wrap the birds in butter-soaked cheesecloth to keep them from drying out while roasting.
FOOD
July 9, 1992 | ANNE MENDELSON
Browse around a bookstore catering to cookbook fanatics or a big library that keeps up with the field, and you're likely to find quite a few facsimile reprints and scholarly editions. Every year seems to swell the ranks of libraries interested in this literature and knowledgeable editors or historians willing to map out unfamiliar culinary/cultural terrain for would-be learners. Some of the grist to this mill comes from donations of major private collections to scholarly libraries.
BOOKS
April 12, 1992 | Douglas Glover, Glover's most recent book, "A Guide to Animal Behavior," was nominated for the 1991 Governor-General's Award for Fiction, Canada's highest literary prize
Albert E. Stone, in his foreword to "Black Eagle Child," calls this book an experimental autobiography. But the reader quickly discovers two things: This tale is not factual--it is full of composite characters and fictionalized events--and it is only tangentially about its author, the Mesquakie Indian poet Ray A. Young Bear, who eventually disappears behind a series of changed names, false leads, alter egos, digressions, epi-stories and myths.
BOOKS
March 31, 1991 | John Espey, Espey's current book is "Strong Drink, Strong Language," reminiscences beginning with his youth in China
In 1907, no one would have thought it necessary before the end of the century to do more than mention Rudyard Kipling's name in order to gain instant recognition of one of the English-speaking world's most accomplished short-story writers, the author of "Kim," one of the earliest and best novels of Indian life, and the two "Jungle Books." For it was in 1907 that Kipling received the Nobel Prize for Literature. But Kipling always has presented something of a problem to literary historians.
BOOKS
May 30, 2004 | Dan Neil, Dan Neil is The Times' automotive critic. He was awarded the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for criticism.
In the not-too-distant future, billboards may become obsolete, replaced by holographic advertisements projected onto car windshields by the vehicles' own "enhanced vision" systems -- a technology that will allow drivers to see, for instance, movie starting times superimposed over theaters they pass, or lunch specials available at a restaurant. These airy figments of virtual shilling will know you better than you know yourself.
BOOKS
September 21, 2003 | Leonard Nathan
The cello never made it, lost to us by chance or choice somewhere between here and there. We, meanwhile, waited, fiddled with our instruments, then finally nodded and began to play without him. What a strange music -- three parts sounded, one silent, heard only in the absence of another.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New developments concerning the National Endowment for the Arts--including a personnel crisis that led to the ouster of its No. 2 official, and new actions by influential cultural institutions protesting obscenity restrictions--combined over the weekend to intensify pressures on the beleaguered agency. Among the developments: * NEA sources confirmed Sunday morning that Alvin S. Felzenberg, the endowment's second highest administrator who assumed his job only this past Feb.
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