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OPINION
December 10, 2011 | Patt Morrison
They're honoring the winners of the 2011 Nobel Prizes this week, but there are a number of human endeavors the Nobels don't cover. Music composition is one of them, and in the breach there is the University of Louisville's prestigious Grawemeyer Award, whose founder once mused that such a prize might mean "perhaps we could find another Mozart. " Its latest winner is Esa-Pekka Salonen, who for 17 years held the baton at the Los Angeles Philharmonic. But the Grawemeyer honors what he did with a pen -- or a computer mouse, or both: the " Violin Concerto " he composed in his last months in L.A. He's taking his concerto on tour, from Boston to Hamburg.
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NEWS
February 25, 1991
The University of Louisville has shipped $2 million worth of equipment used in SETTING BROKEN BONES to the U.S. military in the Persian Gulf. The equipment was to arrive Sunday night in Bahrain. The 1,000 Hoffman External Fixateurs were donated to the university by Kentucky Medical Research and Development. According to Dr.
SPORTS
March 30, 2009 | Shannon Ryan
On one half of the court, Michigan State's Travis Walton strayed from teammates' embraces to an isolated area. He crouched while clasping a Final Four cap and stared at the ceiling, saying a prayer while wearing a look of disbelief. In another corner, Louisville's Terrence Williams appeared just as stunned, wandering along the baseline searching for answers and avoiding the postgame handshake line. Neither player seemed to grasp what had happened after No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
A Claremont religious philosopher has been given a $150,000 prize, awarded in part by a Presbyterian seminary, for a book that says Christianity is not the only true religion--a theory which was a central reason that Presbyterian officials rejected his credentials as a minister several years ago. John H.
SPORTS
January 1, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Second baseman Roberto Alomar of the Toronto Blue Jays does not need surgery on his broken right leg and will probably be able to start spring training on time, team officials said Friday. Alomar, who broke the fibula during a winter league game in Puerto Rico on Wednesday, will be re-examined Monday to verify that an operation will not be required. With no surgery, Alomar should be ready to work out in late February or early March.
SPORTS
January 2, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one impressive stroke, the University of Louisville established before a national television audience that the school also has a football team of national stature. The basketball team already was established, but based on Tuesday's Fiesta Bowl performance, the Cardinals' football team is also worthy. Louisville (10-1-1) dominated every aspect and nearly every moment of the game, leaving Alabama (7-5) shellshocked, 34-7.
SPORTS
February 12, 1989 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
As the University of Louisville basketball team celebrated its National Collegiate Athletic Assn. championship three years ago, former Louisville center Charles Jones made his way from freshman to freshman in the locker room. "Three more, man," Jones called out excitedly. "You'll almost have enough rings for one hand." And who could blame Jones for his optimism? The leader of the group was (Never Nervous) Pervis Ellison, an unaffected, smooth-as-silk 6-foot-9 center from Savannah, Ga.
SPORTS
November 30, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Trout is in the tomato business now. After all, there's only so much a man can take and Trout took and saw it all as an assistant coach with Howard Schnellenberger's first University of Louisville football team, a Tinkertoy program if there ever was one, in 1985. One day, while awaiting the arrival of some prospective recruits, Trout glanced out his office window in time to see a herd of prize cattle amble past the Cardinal football building.
SPORTS
April 3, 2005 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Illinois forward Roger Powell Jr. raised his index finger toward the roof of the Edward Jones Dome in the final seconds of the Fighting Illini's 72-57 semifinal victory over Louisville in the Final Four on Saturday. Yes, Illinois is still No. 1, and this time it is because Powell -- a licensed Pentecostal minister whose teammates call him "the Rev" -- was the answer to quietly uttered prayers. "I was pointing to Jesus. That's what I was doing.
SPORTS
April 2, 2005 | Robyn Norwood
* The game: Illinois (36-1) vs. Louisville (33-4), 3:07 p.m. PST, on Channel 2 * How they got there: The last step was a dramatic one for both teams. Illinois made a comeback against Arizona to reach the Final Four that was so stunning some of the players said they now feel a sense of destiny. Trailing by 15 with four minutes left, Illinois stormed back to win in overtime, 90-89.
SPORTS
March 31, 2005 | Robyn Norwood
Hard to believe, but it has been 18 years since a boyish Rick Pitino first burst into the Final Four in 1987, with a three-point-shooting Providence team led by point guard Billy Donovan that upset top-seeded Georgetown. Though it was the first of Pitino's five Final Fours, it was also the saddest, a March filled with pain after his infant son Daniel, born prematurely, died of heart failure shortly before the tournament began.
SPORTS
March 27, 2005 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
West Virginia's Patrick Beilein banked in a three-point shot from deep in the corner and Louisville Coach Rick Pitino told his Cardinals not to worry. Beilein stopped not far over the half-court line, 30 feet from the basket, and made another. That's OK, Pitino told his wide-eyed pupils. What can you do? Kevin Pittsnogle, a 6-foot-11 center, knocked in a 26-foot three-point shot while he was falling out of bounds. Not to worry, Pitino told the shell-shocked Louisville players, comebacks are fun.
SPORTS
March 25, 2005 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Washington guard Nate Robinson stood by his coach, bent at the waist, trying to stretch out his cramping legs but unable to make the pain in his heart go away. Louisville, champion of Conference USA, regular season and tournament, owner of 31-4 record and a curiously low No. 4 seeding in the NCAA Albuquerque Regional, ran circles around Robinson's top-seeded Huskies on Thursday night in the Sweet 16. The Cardinals built a 12-point halftime lead and just kept going, eliminating Washington, 93-79.
SPORTS
February 12, 2003 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
The life has returned to Louisville basketball, only two seasons after it had slipped away during a 12-19 season in Denny Crum's final season as coach. That was before Rick Pitino arrived, but there have been times when he has felt the life being pulled out of him too. It had nothing to do with his troubled turn as coach and president of the Boston Celtics, his first encounter with failure.
SPORTS
March 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Cornelius Holden set an NCAA Division I record Saturday by making all 14 of his shots and scoring 32 points, including two free throws with eight seconds left to give No. 21 Louisville a 73-71 victory over Southern Mississippi. Holden, a 6-7 sophomore from Crenshaw High, also made all four of his foul shots as the Cardinals came back from a 42-36 halftime deficit. The previous best perfect shooting game in Division I was 13 of 13, held by six players.
SPORTS
March 31, 2005 | Robyn Norwood
Hard to believe, but it has been 18 years since a boyish Rick Pitino first burst into the Final Four in 1987, with a three-point-shooting Providence team led by point guard Billy Donovan that upset top-seeded Georgetown. Though it was the first of Pitino's five Final Fours, it was also the saddest, a March filled with pain after his infant son Daniel, born prematurely, died of heart failure shortly before the tournament began.
SPORTS
March 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
Louisville Athletic Director Tom Jurich doesn't care if Rick Pitino coached at rival Kentucky or failed to turn around the Boston Celtics. He's the only man Jurich wants to replace Hall of Fame coach Denny Crum. Jurich and Pitino will meet in Florida this weekend about the job vacated when Crum retired last Friday. "What I've tried to focus on is who would be the best fit, and who would do the best job and who I would enjoy working with," Jurich said at a news conference Tuesday.
SPORTS
March 3, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
When I get older, losing my hair, many years from now. Will you still be sending me a valentine, birthday greeting, bottle of wine? No, but sometimes they'll cut you a check. Denny Crum turned 64 on Friday and, with administrators leading him by the elbow, gingerly stepped down as Louisville coach after 30 years. Defiant until days ago, when he shook his fist and vowed things would be different once "the real truth is known," he quickly shifted into Al Gore-esque concession mode.
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