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SPORTS
June 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Calipari, who coached the University of Massachusetts basketball team to its best season ever, signed a four-year contract extension worth $700,000.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Michael J. Mishak and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
NORTH DARTMOUTH, Mass. - If Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is responsible for setting off pressure-cooker bombs at the Boston Marathon, as authorities allege, he displayed a remarkable poker face at his college campus in southeastern Massachusetts. The 19-year-old sophomore studied engineering, played soccer and became known for party-hopping and smoking marijuana. When he talked to his friends, it was usually about one subject - girls. As a freshman, he decorated his dorm room wall with two posters: one of Einstein, the other of 12 bikini-clad women on a beach.
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SPORTS
October 8, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A House committee referred its investigation into wrongdoing at the University of Massachusetts' School of Physical Education to the state attorney general, citing potential criminal wrongdoing. Legislators began their inquiry after several alumni, angered by the resignation of football Coach Jim Reid last January, demanded an accounting. Reid quit because of cuts in his scholarship program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2008 | Larry Williams, Hartford Courant
AMHERST, Mass. -- It's somehow fitting that many of the best movies made in East Germany are stored in an underground bunker designed to survive a nuclear attack. These are the archives of the DEFA Film Library at the University of Massachusetts, the largest collection outside Germany of films made at Deutsche Film-Aktiengesellschaft, the state-run studio in the Babelsberg district of Potsdam, about 22 miles southwest of Berlin.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
About 200 international students at the University of Massachusetts have refused to pay a new $65-a-semester fee, a protest that could result in dismissal and loss of their student visas. The fee was designed to compensate for cuts to the university's international programs office. Part of the fee will help pay for a tracking program called the Student and Exchange Visitor Information Systems, created by Congress.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The trustees of the University of Massachusetts named a permanent replacement for former President William M. Bulger, who resigned in August after congressional scrutiny of his fugitive mobster brother. Jack Wilson, who had been the school's interim president since fall, was appointed in Boston by the board of trustees on an 11-0 vote, with three abstentions.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A House panel voted immunity for University of Massachusetts President William Bulger, whose brother is one of America's most wanted fugitives, in exchange for testimony before Congress on links between the FBI's Boston office and its organized crime informants. The Committee on Government Reform may ask Bulger about his brother, James "Whitey" Bulger, who is accused of participating in 18 homicides while an FBI informant.
SPORTS
April 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Coach John Calipari, who led the University of Massachusetts to a 30-5 record and into the third round of the NCAA tournament this season, was given a new four-year contract worth up to $700,000. The new package raises Calipari's annual base pay from $77,000 to $120,000, officials at the Amherst, Mass., campus said. Other benefits, including revenue from a summer camp and broadcast deals, could lift his total annual income to $175,000.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 150 students emerged from a University of Massachusetts building they occupied for six days demanding greater minority enrollment and more campus funding. "United we fought, together we did this," Maurice Caston-Powe, president of the Student Government Assn., told 300 students outside the Goodell Building in Amherst.
NEWS
February 15, 1988
Black, Latino, American Indian and Asian students occupying a University of Massachusetts building in Amherst for the third day said a church had pledged money and restaurants had donated hot meals. "We haven't even had to leave the building to buy food," said Rio Gabriel, 21, a junior from Toronto.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The trustees of the University of Massachusetts named a permanent replacement for former President William M. Bulger, who resigned in August after congressional scrutiny of his fugitive mobster brother. Jack Wilson, who had been the school's interim president since fall, was appointed in Boston by the board of trustees on an 11-0 vote, with three abstentions.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
About 200 international students at the University of Massachusetts have refused to pay a new $65-a-semester fee, a protest that could result in dismissal and loss of their student visas. The fee was designed to compensate for cuts to the university's international programs office. Part of the fee will help pay for a tracking program called the Student and Exchange Visitor Information Systems, created by Congress.
BOOKS
June 8, 2003 | Herbert Gold, Herbert Gold is the author of many novels, including "Fathers," "The Man Who Was Not With It" and, most recently, "Daughter Mine."
Tom Engelhardt's "The Last Days of Publishing" can't possibly be libelous. Granted, it's a satisfyingly virulent, comical, absurd, deeply grieving true portrait of how things work today in the sleek factories of conglomerate book producers, but hey, it's not libelous, it's just a story.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A House panel voted immunity for University of Massachusetts President William Bulger, whose brother is one of America's most wanted fugitives, in exchange for testimony before Congress on links between the FBI's Boston office and its organized crime informants. The Committee on Government Reform may ask Bulger about his brother, James "Whitey" Bulger, who is accused of participating in 18 homicides while an FBI informant.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
University of Massachusetts President William M. Bulger on Tuesday defended his decision not to alert law enforcement authorities after being contacted by his fugitive mobster brother in 1995. Bulger said his brother, James "Whitey" Bulger, called him in January 1995 -- shortly after he fled Massachusetts -- and asked for legal advice. "It was a private conversation," William Bulger said, when asked by reporters why he didn't report the contact with his brother to authorities.
BOOKS
May 13, 2001 | TOM ENGELHARDT, Tom Engelhardt, consulting editor at Metropolitan Books, is the author of "The End of Victory Culture."
Women, children and old men slaughtered in a free-fire zone. Shame, denial, anguish over tainted American heroism, the doubting of accounts from "the other side." Here we are again, so many decades later, back on the ground in another Vietnam horror-scape, this time with former Sen. Bob Kerrey. It's like one of those nightmares in which something chases you until you wake up, and the second you close your eyes, there it is again.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent rainy day, J. Edward Sunderland stood next to a weedy field here, pointing to the site of a project he hopes will help the nation in its quest for energy independence. If all goes well, the drab-looking field, on the campus of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, will one day contain an array of solar collectors capable of supplying heat and hot water year-round to a future 12,000-seat sports arena, along with an existing gymnasium building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | NICK OWCHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Nick Owchar is an assistant editor of Book Review
Ever since "the shot heard round the world" was fired at Concord in 1775, that quaint town in the sleepy Massachusetts countryside has been the unlikely nest of revolutionary fervor. There, in the 1830s, a small group of thinkers, led by a tall gentleman with mutton chop sideburns, criticized Christianity and its sibling religions for claiming that they alone could put people in touch with the divine.
SPORTS
May 9, 1997 | From Associated Press
Massachusetts' 1996 Final Four finish--its best ever--was stripped by the NCAA on Thursday over former star Marcus Camby's acceptance of gifts from a sports agent. The NCAA Executive Committee, meeting in Pebble Beach, also determined that Massachusetts must return $151,000 in tournament money.
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