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June 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
The University of Minnesota women's gymnastics coach was fired Tuesday after she accidentally gave members of her team a videotape that included sex scenes involving her and her husband, an assistant coach, according to the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Katalin Deli was fired by Chris Voelz, women's athletic director, who said Deli's contract will end effective June 30. Gabor Deli resigned, effective June 15.
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BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Ronald C. Woolsey, Ronald C. Woolsey is the author of several books, including "Migrants West: Toward the Southern California Frontier" and "Will Thrall and the San Gabriels: A Man to Match the Mountains."
Los Angeles and San Diego are bookends to a sprawling landscape of suburbs and industry, although it wasn't always so. Southern California, a land of little water and arid scenery, was willed into existence, an invention of boosters, health seekers, aqueduct builders and immigrants seeking work in plantation-style orange and lemon groves. "Ramona," a 19th century novel that captured the nation's imagination, is part of the inventive spirit that formed Southern California's identity.
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SPORTS
February 26, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
University of Minnesota basketball Coach Clem Haskins will be reprimanded but not suspended or fined for his criticism of Big Ten officials.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
About 1,800 striking clerical workers reached a tentative contract with the University of Minnesota and said they would return to work. Neither side would reveal details of the agreement, which was reached after two all-night bargaining sessions. Union leaders claimed victory, saying the university had made concessions on health-care costs, while the university president said no "substantial" new money was offered.
SPORTS
January 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
University of Minnesota forward Randy Carter, the Gophers' second-leading scorer at 10.4 points per game, will have surgery for bone spurs on his ankles and sit out at least six weeks of the Big Ten season.
SPORTS
February 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
University of Minnesota officials met with the NCAA Infractions Committee to discuss 20 alleged rules violations in football, basketball and wrestling. Lou Holtz, Notre Dame football coach, was among those appearing before the committee, which is expected to issue its findings in three to six weeks. Holtz has been accused of three rules violations while he was coach at Minnesota in 1984-85.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
About 1,800 clerical workers took to the picket lines after contract talks broke down between their union and the University of Minnesota, the first strike at the institution in nearly 60 years. The workers, members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, struck campuses in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Duluth, Morris and Crookston. The proposal included a salary freeze the first year, a 2.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
About 1,800 clerical workers took to the picket lines after contract talks broke down between their union and the University of Minnesota, the first strike at the institution in nearly 60 years. The workers, members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, struck campuses in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Duluth, Morris and Crookston. The proposal included a salary freeze the first year, a 2.
BOOKS
September 7, 2003 | Tony Platt, Tony Platt, emeritus professor of social work at Cal State Sacramento, is researching the history of eugenics.
How is it that the once obscure history of eugenics -- the pseudoscientific belief in the biological origins of social success and failure -- has become a hot topic for academics, reporters and investigative journalists? Any story that involves a combustible mix of reproduction, race and class is bound to spark attention, but there's more going on here than intellectual prurience.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | DAVID CRARY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A month before its publication, a provocative book about children's sexuality is being denounced by conservatives as evil and prompting angry calls for action against the University of Minnesota Press. The book, "Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children From Sex," argues that young Americans, though bombarded with sexual images from the mass media, are often deprived of realistic advice about sex.
BOOKS
July 29, 2001 | JOHN RYLE, John Ryle is the anthropology and ecology editor of the (London) Times Literary Supplement
"There is nothing more contemporary, nothing more now in Paris these days than the abrupt and unexpected triumph of Cuban music," wrote Alejo Carpentier in 1922. And later, "Even the pallid daughters of Albion forget for a moment their Pre-Raphaelite poses by burying themselves in the sonorous sortilege of the Antilles." The youthful Carpentier, later the begetter of magical realism, was a journalist and radio producer from Havana, reporting on life in the metropolis for an audience at home.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Gangelhoff found her conscience. In the process, she lost everything else. Two years after her confessions of academic cheating brought down the University of Minnesota basketball program, she is still struggling to piece together her life. She's living in a casino motel on an Ojibwe Indian reservation in northwest Wisconsin and working as a teacher at a nearby tribal school.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | LISA SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a young girl growing up during the Cultural Revolution in China, Wang Ping was horrified by her size 6 feet, which she saw as a pair of "steamboats," a Chinese fortunetelling omen that she was born to be a maid or a servant. To remedy the situation, she secretly tried to bind them into "golden lilies" or "lotus feet." After six months of burning pain, she gave up--though she had managed to stunt further growth.
SPORTS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
Clem Haskins agreed Friday to a $1.5-million buyout of his contract with Minnesota, even though university investigators have found no evidence implicating the basketball coach in an academic fraud scandal. University President Mark Yudof said it is "extremely likely" that fraud did occur and said a change was necessary to restore confidence in the university. Haskins will step down June 30, three years before his contract was to expire.
HEALTH
August 31, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
In Room 4-180 of the University of Minnesota's Weaver-Densford lecture hall, a student is prone on a padded table with four long needles protruding from her right calf. Welcome to a medical school that has decided it's time to teach students that Western medicine isn't the only way to heal. The guest lecturer--registered nurse and acupuncturist Colet Lahoz--examines the heart and small intestines by pressing her fingers on the left wrist of the student, who has complained of chronic leg pain.
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