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NEWS
May 22, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to conceive of an institution with an image more entwined with Southern history and tradition than the tree-shaded campus of the University of Mississippi. During the Civil War, when Ole Miss was all male, its entire student body withdrew to enlist in the Confederate army. "Dixie" and the Confederate battle flag still are mainstays at sporting events, and Colonel Reb--a whiskered caricature of a plantation owner--is the school mascot. Even the nickname is a throwback.
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NATIONAL
February 10, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A tornado touched down in a southern Mississippi college town Sunday evening, officials said, inflicting "significant damage" and injuring at least 10 people. "We do have significant damage throughout the city,” Kyle Hopkins, emergency operations director for Forrest County, told the Los Angeles Times. No deaths had been reported, he said, but at least 10 people were taken to a hospital with injuries. The University of Southern Mississippi  in Hattiesburg posted a statement on its website Sunday declaring a state of emergency, confirming damage to at least four campus buildings and asking students not to return to campus until further notice.
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NEWS
September 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
The University of Mississippi has banned a fraternity for leaving two members naked and painted with racial slurs at mostly black Rust College. The chancellor of Ole Miss said Wednesday that the incident had opened an old wound at the university, where violence erupted in 1962 when its first black student, James Meredith, enrolled. "Nothing can totally undo the effects of the deplorable events of Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
SPORTS
February 27, 1991
Randy Karliner of Ocean View High School has signed a letter of intent to play football at the University of Mississippi, Ronald Karliner, his father, said Tuesday. Karliner, a 6-foot-2, 195-pound quarterback and linebacker, has been a three-year starter for the Seahawks. He was twice selected first-team all-Sunset League and was named the league's offensive player of the year as a senior. As a junior, Karliner guided Ocean View to the league co-championship, the school's first football title.
SPORTS
July 6, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former football player at the University of Mississippi said alumni promised him money for touchdowns and he saw other players get paid, a newspaper reported. J.J. Walker, a backup receiver in his only season at Mississippi after signing a scholarship in 1989 out of Daleville (Ala.) High, told the Dothan (Ala.) Eagle: "I had alumni promise me $400 for a touchdown catch and $200 for a touchdown run. I never accepted their money, but I saw other guys get money."
SPORTS
November 18, 1994 | Associated Press
The University of Mississippi football program was put on four years' probation and had its scholarships halved Thursday in what the NCAA called "one of the most serious cases" heard recently. The Rebels will not be allowed to play postseason games in 1995 and 1996 and cannot appear on television in 1995. It is the second time in less than 10 years that the Mississippi football team will serve probation.
NEWS
September 2, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The King was dead--on that, at least, the scholars seemed to agree. But there was consensus about little else. Was the blue-eyed, hip-swiveling crooner more rooted in gospel or country? Was the poor boy from Tupelo consciously turning the world on its head when he strummed his guitar and twitched his leg--or just doing what felt good at the time? Were his 31 feature films mere schlock or veiled political commentary?
SPORTS
October 29, 1989 | Associated Press
Ron Lee (Chuckie) Mullins, a University of Mississippi free safety, suffered a paralyzing neck injury Saturday when he made a first-quarter tackle in the Rebels' game against Vanderbilt. Mullins, a 6-foot, 170-pound redshirt freshman from Russellville, Ala., was airlifted 75 miles to Baptist Central Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. A spokesman in the hospital's critical care unit said no condition was immediately available.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was before the assassination of Medgar Evers, before people rioted over a black man attending the University of Mississippi. The civil rights movement was still young. So, in the winter of 1957, Stanley Hill expected nothing more than a basketball game when he and his Iona College teammates traveled south to play the University of Mississippi.
OPINION
September 4, 2009
When the federal Department of Health and Human Services recently issued a request for proposals, seeking competitive applications for the production, analysis and distribution of "marijuana cigarettes," the request might have seemed a bit unusual to those unfamiliar with Washington's dance around cannabis research. The federal government, after all, is not widely known to support marijuana cultivation. But those in the know just shrugged. The department has issued similar requests every few years to select a contractor to conduct government-approved marijuana research, and with depressing regularity it has then awarded an exclusive contract to the University of Mississippi.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Overseas American Growing Up Gringo in the Tropics Gene H. Bell-Villada University Press of Mississippi: 260 pp., $28 * ONE consequence of the enormous global U.S. presence since World War II has been the large numbers of American youth whose upbringing has taken place, in whole or in part, outside the U.S. mainland, writes author Gene H. Bell-Villada, who is himself one of these children he calls "Third Culture Kids."
SPORTS
December 16, 2004 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Ed Orgeron, USC's defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator, has been hired as head coach at Mississippi and will be introduced today at a news conference in Oxford, Miss. Orgeron, 43, replaces David Cutcliffe, who was fired Dec. 1 after the Rebels finished 4-7. It is the first head coaching job for Orgeron, a Louisiana native who was an assistant at Miami, Nicholls State and Syracuse before joining USC's staff under former coach Paul Hackett in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alice Faye, who died at 83 in 1998, was a cherished star of Hollywood musicals in the late 1930s and early '40s who stayed in the public eye almost until her death, even though she walked out on a flourishing movie career in 1945. A beautiful blue-eyed blond with a stunning figure, a warm personality and low singing voice, she brought a sultry quality to the screen. In a mere six years at 20th Century Fox, Faye became America's No. 1 female box office star.
SPORTS
March 12, 2002 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's the bespectacled young coach who bows his head and leads a prayer before his weekly news conferences. There's the 5-foot-5 point guard who became the tallest man in Mississippi when his buzzer-beating three-point basket vaulted Ole Miss to the Sweet 16 last season. There's the "Provine Posse," three Rebel starters from Jackson Provine High who pride themselves on the best man-to-man defense in the Southeastern Conference.
SPORTS
August 29, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Vaught's ranch-style home overlooks 160 acres off Highway 6, not far from the big yellow house built by University of Mississippi law school graduate John Grisham with his literary proceeds. Vaught, 92, peers out his window at land made famous by authors of hardcovers sold and signed at renowned Square Books, never having thought he'd live long enough to see the day Ole Miss football would again be worth putting pen to pad.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Around the courthouse square that inspired the novels of native son William Faulkner, this university town threw the oddest sort of weekend literary and academic street party. The occasion was the publication of the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. Ten years in the making, the book was a project of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi.
SPORTS
August 29, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Vaught's ranch-style home overlooks 160 acres off Highway 6, not far from the big yellow house built by University of Mississippi law school graduate John Grisham with his literary proceeds. Vaught, 92, peers out his window at land made famous by authors of hardcovers sold and signed at renowned Square Books, never having thought he'd live long enough to see the day Ole Miss football would again be worth putting pen to pad.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was before the assassination of Medgar Evers, before people rioted over a black man attending the University of Mississippi. The civil rights movement was still young. So, in the winter of 1957, Stanley Hill expected nothing more than a basketball game when he and his Iona College teammates traveled south to play the University of Mississippi.
BOOKS
February 13, 2000 | DAVID RIEFF, David Rieff is the author of several books, including "Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West," and is co-editor of "Crimes of War: What the Public Should Know."
Like gun control and abortion, the death penalty is one of those peculiar American institutions that make citizens of the other developed countries shake their heads with wonder. Capital punishment has been abolished throughout the developed world, and it is now inconceivable that it could ever be reinstated in the countries of the European Union.
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