Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUniversity Of New Mexico
IN THE NEWS

University Of New Mexico

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Gary Ness was fired as the University of New Mexico's athletic director after one year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA basketball Coach Steve Alford is still trying to disentangle himself from the University of New Mexico. New Mexico says Alford owes the university $1 million, which was the buyout amount in a contract extension that was to take effect April 1, two days after UCLA hired him. Alford, in a letter to the school, has offered $200,000 under the terms of his previous contract. Alford was required to give 30 days' notice, so New Mexico officials believe he is therefore bound by the terms of what would have been his new contract.
Advertisement
SPORTS
November 17, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
University of Houston Athletic Director Rudy Davalos has accepted a similar position with the University of New Mexico.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Gustavo Arellano, Gustavo Arellano, a columnist for OC Weekly and a contributing editor to The Times' editorial pages, is the author of "¬°Ask a Mexican!"
NO one remembers when the first person from my mother's birthplace, El Cargadero, arrived in Anaheim. Nor do we know who it was. Maybe it was my great-grandfather Sabas Miranda, who left the idyllic Zacatecas hamlet nestled in the mountains of central Mexico in the early 1900s to pick oranges in the heart of California's citrus country, or maybe it was another courageous villager seeking a job.
SPORTS
November 28, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The NCAA has denied the University of New Mexico's request to reinstate the eligibility of Mexican gymnast Luis Lopez, who said he received a $500 monthly stipend from his country's national gymnastics federation.
SPORTS
November 2, 1989
Chris Tower, a 6-foot-10 sophomore forward from Westminster High School, is leaving the University of New Mexico basketball team, Lobos Coach Dave Bliss said Wednesday. Tower, who recently had been disciplined by Bliss for missing study hall, played 97 minutes in 15 games last season and averaged 2.2 points and 1.5 rebounds a game. "We are disappointed that Chris has decided to leave New Mexico (basketball)," Bliss said in a statement. "We wish him success."
SPORTS
August 26, 1988 | Associated Press
A University of New Mexico football player was partially paralyzed Thursday when he was injured during practice, but the extent of the paralysis and whether it is permanent was not known, a University Hospital spokeswoman said. Senior Alex Bolden of San Diego suffered a pressure cervical spine injury, the spokeswoman said. "He is stable and alert and expected to remain in that condition," she said.
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is the author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series, the latest of which, "Strange Bedfellows," is partly set in Orange County.
HOW remote yet purposeful they seem, women walking on an upscale city street, each loaded down with a bag containing lunch, a pair of work shoes, perhaps a book to read on the bus. In our cars, we pass them in the evening as they ride the bus home, women mute with weariness after working a 10-hour job and then attending night classes to learn English, or cosmetology, or medical record-keeping.
BOOKS
July 18, 2004 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
Writing of his travels in the Southwest in 1924, D.H. Lawrence counted 800 cars in a parking lot on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona, where some 3,000 tourists had gathered to see a performance of the famous Snake Dance. Most of them managed to convince themselves that they were witnessing something authentic and sacred. For Lawrence, however, the spectacle was something wholly debased. "And what had we come to see, all of us? Men with snakes in their mouths, like a circus?"
BOOKS
April 20, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
WHEN men take to the road in books and movies, their experiences are often celebrated as journeys of exploration and conquest, self-discovery and self-perfection. But when the women in "Thelma & Louise" do the same, they are depicted as runaways and desperadoes who end up dead.
BOOKS
March 23, 2003 | Philip Levine, Philip Levine is the author of numerous books, including "New Selected Poems," "So Ask: Essays, Conversations, and Interviews" and "The Bread of Time: Toward an Autobiography." He has twice been awarded the National Book Award and in 1995 won the Pulitzer Prize for "The Simple Truth."
What is it like to write poetry for a country that doesn't want poetry? Ask anyone who tried doing it back in the '50s, and he or she will struggle toward an answer. ("Like making love to someone sound asleep," the Los Angeles poet Henri Coulette once said to me.) Let's make the game even harder.
BOOKS
May 6, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, Jill Leovy, a Times staff writer in the Metro section, has recently reported from Mexico
Among the incalculable costs of seven decades of one-party rule in Mexico is the damage it wrought on the Mexican psyche. Authoritarian rule in Mexico--"velvet repression," to borrow journalist Mary Beth Sheridan's phrase--was not only bad for the country's economy and infrastructure, it also was deeply demoralizing to its people. The corruption it fostered was more insinuating than malicious, more wheedling than ironfisted.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | PAULA L. WOODS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the more intriguing characters in "Nickel and Dime," Gary Soto's collection of three novellas published last year, is Silver Mendez, the once-promising poet of the Chicano movimiento of the 1970s. In "Nickel and Dime," one gets a glimpse of how Silver squanders what slender talent he has and is reduced to sleeping with another homeless man on a mattress outside a photographer friend's home in Berkeley.
SPORTS
March 20, 2001 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
College basketball usually doesn't always work this well. Ruben Douglas knows it. Fran Fraschilla knows it. That's why they look up into the cloudless Albuquerque sky and thank those shining stars that seem close enough to touch. Fraschilla, a coach raised in Brooklyn, was in the beginning stages of rebuilding the program at New Mexico.
NEWS
March 9, 2000 | PAULA L. WOODS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gary Soto has a knack for telling stories that shimmer. His latest, an interlocking series of novellas called "Nickel and Dime," focuses on three Mexican American men who live beneath the radar, outside the hyped-up realm of Internet sweepstakes, lotto fever and instant millionaires. The protagonist of Soto's first novella, "We Ain't Asking Much," is Roberto Silva, whose days as a security guard at Oakland's Walnut Bank are numbered.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|