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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010 | By Jon Burlingame, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Max Steiner, the pioneering film composer who wrote the music for "King Kong" and "Gone With the Wind," was once complimented as the man who invented modern movie music. "Nonsense," he replied. "The idea originated with Richard Wagner. Listen to the incidental scoring behind the recitatives in his operas. If Wagner had lived in this century, he would have been the No. 1 film composer." That last point is debatable. (Try to imagine Wagner working for Harvey Weinstein.) But Wagner's influence on film-music history certainly has been enormous, "probably more than any other single composer," says Roger Hickman, professor of music at California State University Long Beach and author of "Reel Music: Exploring 100 Years of Film Music."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By John Mauceri, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the Academy Award for original score is announced Sunday night, there will be joy and disappointment - and Monday morning quarterbacking. Some years the most important score is recognized, as in 1946 when Miklos Rozsa won for "Spellbound. " Or consider when the most important pre-"Star Wars" score, Max Steiner's epic "Gone With the Wind," did not, in fact, win. That statuette went to Herbert Stothart for the underscoring to "The Wizard of Oz. " (Then again, who today could even choose between those two, not to mention the amazing group of 1939 films whose scores were nominated?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Aeronautical engineer Jim Drake had already solved the "puzzle" of pairing a surfboard with a sail when a young man who stopped to admire "the Baja Board" in the late 1960s suggested what he called "the perfect name": the Windsurfer. In his Santa Monica garage, Drake had designed and built a prototype meant to be ridden in a novel way — standing up — and steered by an inventive hand-held sail assembly. He first tested the board in 1967 off Marina del Rey and the "wind-propelled apparatus" was patented three years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Gene Evans, the pyrotechnic designer whose fireworks displays lighted up the night sky at the Hollywood Bowl for the last 39 years, has died. He was 70. Evans, who had not been ill, died in his sleep July 8 at his home in Anaheim, said Ramona Shaw, his partner of 27 years. During his nearly four-decade career, Evans was one of the pyrotechnic designers for the 1986 Statue of Liberty centennial celebration in New York Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Family dramas are a dime a dozen in the low-budget independent film world. But family dramas combined with the conventions of a film noir ? set in present-day Oregon, no less ? are few and far between. That's the unusual mix of "Cold Weather," a microbudget feature (it cost about $100,000 to produce) from 29-year-old writer-director Aaron Katz. If it sounds like a surprising blend, it may help to know that the man who created it was taken aback too. "I don't know, I didn't mean to write something like this," said Katz, sitting outdoors at a Los Feliz restaurant on a recent publicity stop in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Mark Olsen
While film festivals are most commonly thought of as launching pads for filmmakers, they also serve as stages to break out performers as well. This year's Los Angeles Film Festival may give just such a boost to an actress appearing in two films — Trieste Kelly Dunn. Writer-director Aaron Katz's slacker detective yarn "Cold Weather" was the toast of this spring's South by Southwest Film Festival, and much of the movie's emotional resonance comes from the performances by Dunn and Cris Lankenau, who play a sister and brother searching for a missing friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
More Dude and hello, Dolly! That's one way of (imperfectly) trying to synopsize the 2011 season at the Hollywood Bowl, which will begin selling subscription series tickets Wednesday. (Single tickets go on sale May 7, when the Bowl's complete programming will be announced.) Country diva Dolly Parton will make her Bowl debut on July 22 (with a July 23 encore), bringing 45 years' worth of Nashville hits and, no doubt, some killer fashion ensembles with her. And Los Angeles Philharmonic music director Gustavo Dudamel (aka The Dude)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2013 | By Michael Miller
On her eighth day of rehearsal at UC Irvine, Kitty McNamee decided to refocus her dancers on the theme of their piece. Rather than demonstrate steps or go over musical motifs, the choreographer gathered her team around and read a different set of directions - from the dictionary. The word in question was "transit," which is also the working title of McNamee's entry in UC Irvine's annual National Choreographers Initiative. With the online Oxford Dictionaries offering a slew of meanings, she rattled them off quickly: the movement of people or materials, the passage of celestial bodies and so on. FOR THE RECORD: Dance program: An article about the National Choreographers Initiative in the July 24 Calendar section described the initiative as a UC Irvine event.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | Sylvia Adcock, Special to The Times
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- The Main Street set is fake, of course. A movie back lot built with a little bit of local flavor (the doughnut shop storefront is Krispy Kreme, native to North Carolina, ditto the Wachovia Bank). A female mannequin looks out from a curtained second-floor window on the quiet set; in the distance is the skyline of a small southern city. The skyline is real.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2009 | Jon Burlingame
Disney music at Disney Hall? Some might say: What took so long? On Tuesday night, Walt Disney Concert Hall will host "The Disney Symphonic Legacy," the first time a program of all-Disney music has been offered since the venue opened in 2003. And it will mark the Disney Hall debut of longtime Hollywood Bowl Orchestra conductor John Mauceri. The concert will draw from more than 70 years of orchestral music written for Disney-produced movies, from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937)
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