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BOOKS
May 23, 2004 | John Hollander, John Hollander is the author of numerous books of poetry, including "Picture Window" and "Figurehead," and several volumes of criticism and edited "American Wits" for the Library of America. He is Sterling professor emeritus of English at Yale University.
There were no seasons in Paradise. Even in the Golden Age of classical mythology -- when, under the care of the harvest god Saturn, the Earth itself, untouched by hoe or ploughshare, yielded an ample sufficiency of everything -- the Roman poet Ovid tells us ver erat aeternum: Spring was everlasting. And so it was, implicitly, in Eden: Renaissance poets, conflating the two in various visions of an earthly paradise, delighted in elaborating on this.
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BOOKS
November 30, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
Playwrights and pop singers -- from Luis Valdez ("Zoot Suit") to the Cherry Poppin' Daddies ("Zoot Suit Riot") -- have elevated the 1942 slaying known as the Sleepy Lagoon murder and the so-called Zoot Suit Riot of 1943 to mythic status in the popular culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | From Associated Press
It'll be pop and circumstance at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte's graduation ceremony next month, with Clay Aiken among the graduating class. The "American Idol" runner-up will pick up his diploma Dec. 20, his publicist said. And for only the second time in the school's seven-year history, graduation guests must have tickets to attend. Each ticket will be printed with a bar code and scanned at the door to prevent the use of counterfeits.
BOOKS
November 16, 2003 | Jim Sleeper, Jim Sleeper, a lecturer in political science at Yale, is the author of "Liberal Racism" and "The Closest of Strangers."
Liberalism is "living on borrowed time -- taking for granted the spiritual and cultural resources that liberals depend on but do nothing to replenish," writes historian David L. Chappell, revivifying an old argument in his stunning reinterpretation of the American civil rights movement as a profoundly illiberal undertaking.
SPORTS
April 14, 2003 | Bill Dwyre
Kansas Coach Roy Williams, attending the 27th Wooden Awards banquet Sunday night in Los Angeles, said he is struggling with the possibility of becoming coach at North Carolina, where he attended school and was an assistant under Dean Smith. "I'm going to go home and get a good night's sleep for the first time in two weeks," said Williams, who was presented with the John R. Wooden Legendary Coaching Award on Sunday. "I have a huge decision to make.
SPORTS
March 29, 2003 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
A meeting between North Carolina players and Athletic Director Dick Baddour this week has speculation soaring about Coach Matt Doherty's job, raising questions once again about whether Kansas Coach Roy Williams might return to his alma mater. Williams turned down the job in 2000 to remain at Kansas, disappointing mentor Dean Smith as well as fans in his home state.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A hacker used a University of North Carolina computer system to steal personal financial information from EBay users, and at least one person lost money, the FBI said. Users of the Internet auction site complained to the FBI that they had received fraudulent e-mails that appeared to come from EBay. The e-mails told recipients their accounts were suspended until they verified some personal information -- including their credit card numbers.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2002 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Monday tersely turned down an attempt by a conservative Christian group to halt the University of North Carolina from using a text on the Islamic holy book, the Koran, to teach new students. Without elaborating on the reasoning behind its decision, the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., said lawyers for the Family Policy Network had "failed to satisfy the requirements" for halting the study program.
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