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University Of Oklahoma

SPORTS
March 23, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Put a basketball in the hands of Stacey Dales and give her a three-on-two fastbreak to lead. Then sit back and watch. The lean, 6-foot blond with pale blue eyes becomes a flash of lightning, bolting her way down the center of the court, glancing at streaking teammates on the wings, gauging who has the best chance to finish off the play. Her pass may bounce through traffic. Or be whipped on a 45-degree angle. It may be lofted toward the rim.
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SPORTS
January 3, 2001 | BILL PLASCHKE
When I think of Chris Weinke, I think not of a tall, blond quarterback, but a short, red-haired mom. She was a college classmate. In a room full of unspoiled dreams and fresh mouths, she was our most unusual classmate. Unusual because she was old. The red-haired mom was around 28, which at the time seemed like 50. She had a child, which at the time seemed like a dozen. She was one of us, but she wasn't. She engaged in less small talk. She took better notes. She worried more about tests.
SPORTS
January 3, 2001 | J.A. ADANDE
This is good. So good. We're two-thirds of the way there. The more confusion the better, because it just makes the bowl championship series look worse. Miami beat new/old rival Florida, 37-20, Tuesday night in a Sugar Bowl game juiced with so much emotion that even the Hurricane mascot was called for a penalty. If Florida State can knock off unbeaten Oklahoma in tonight's Orange Bowl, the Hurricanes feel they should receive a share of the national championship.
SPORTS
January 2, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are two things missing from Oklahoma's remarkable return to college football prominence: Mugs and thugs. The last time the Sooners played for a national title, in 1987, Coach Barry Switzer's boys were painting the town the color of their jerseys: red. The Sports Illustrated cover shot we recall from that era is an OU quarterback being led away in handcuffs after a cocaine bust.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Federal regulators have shut down all government-funded human medical experiments at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Tulsa amid evidence that researchers there broke multiple rules designed to protect patients, then tried to cover up their lapses by withholding information from university overseers and patients.
SPORTS
March 28, 1997 | ERIK HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be fooled by Ty Wilcox's demeanor. He's not one of those wrestlers who think they have to grunt, scream or growl to be heard. Nor is he a physical specimen whose muscles ripple with every move. Instead, Wilcox is a humble, rather quiet athlete with an average build. Since Wilcox transferred from Grass Valley Nevada Union to Calvary Chapel two years ago, he has won two consecutive state titles, at 152 and 160 pounds. He also has earned The Times Orange County wrestler of the year honors.
SPORTS
August 15, 1996 | STAN DORSEY, THE SPORTING NEWS
To look at new Oklahoma coach John Blake now, you could easily mistake him for a player. His broad shoulders and athletic stride mimic the swagger and confidence so often displayed by young college athletes basking in their physical and egotistical primes. But only a year ago, the picture was not so pretty. Rather than lean muscle mass and subtle ripples, Blake's physique had rounded out to a robust 340 pounds.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The grainy, black-and-white image of a little girl fills the TV screen, her guileless voice keeping count as she plucks the petals off a daisy. Before she can finish, she is drowned out by a man's voice, gravely counting down to zero. As the camera zooms closer, an atomic bomb erupts in the darkness of her eye, replacing the girl with a fiery mushroom cloud. "We must either love each other," the narrator says, "or we must die."
SPORTS
August 28, 1995 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here at Camp Schnellenberger, star defensive end Cedric Jones knows exactly how many steps there are from the bottom of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium to the top. He knows because the new coach ordered every player to scale the east-side steps twice a day, two times a week for four weeks. "Yeah, 71 to the top," said Jones. "In my [previous] three years here, we never ran the stadium. But a lot of people had dreams the night before." Starting Sooner tackle J.R.
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