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University Of Oklahoma

SPORTS
March 31, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something historic will happen here tonight. The undefeated Connecticut Huskies will pounce on Oklahoma as if it were a favorite rawhide chew toy, drag it around for 40 minutes and toss it in the pile with their other 38 victims this season. Then, having won the NCAA tournament, the Huskies will be proclaimed one of the best women's basketball teams ever, maybe the best.
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SPORTS
March 30, 2002 | Paul Gutierrez
Indiana vs. Oklahoma At Georgia Dome in Atlanta 3 p.m., channel 2 * STYLE OF PLAY: Oklahoma thrives on rattling opponents with its physical, suffocating defense while talking the most trash of any team in the Final Four. The stingy Sooners are giving up only 64.4 points while getting 9.1 steals a game. Indiana, which began the tournament averaging 70.2 points, prefers to slow things down in the half-court and dump the ball low to silky forward Jared Jeffries.
SPORTS
March 30, 2002 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We'll try to hurry this Indiana-Oklahoma game advance story along so as to make way for the really important game advance story featuring Kansas and Maryland. We'll keep this short and tight and to the point because, while today's Indiana-Oklahoma winner technically moves on to Monday night's national title game, the first of the two national semifinals at the Georgia Dome has sort of a consolation-game feel to it.
SPORTS
March 29, 2002 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oklahoma isn't just OK anymore. The sprawling campus is dripping Ws and dollar signs, an institution of higher football suddenly flush with Final Fours and lavish sports facilities without hash marks. For one week, anyway, basketball talk has nudged aside the relentless speculation on whether Jason White or Nate Hybl will play quarterback and who will replace graduated linebacker Rocky Calmus.
SPORTS
March 23, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Put a basketball in the hands of Stacey Dales and give her a three-on-two fastbreak to lead. Then sit back and watch. The lean, 6-foot blond with pale blue eyes becomes a flash of lightning, bolting her way down the center of the court, glancing at streaking teammates on the wings, gauging who has the best chance to finish off the play. Her pass may bounce through traffic. Or be whipped on a 45-degree angle. It may be lofted toward the rim.
SPORTS
January 3, 2001 | BILL PLASCHKE
When I think of Chris Weinke, I think not of a tall, blond quarterback, but a short, red-haired mom. She was a college classmate. In a room full of unspoiled dreams and fresh mouths, she was our most unusual classmate. Unusual because she was old. The red-haired mom was around 28, which at the time seemed like 50. She had a child, which at the time seemed like a dozen. She was one of us, but she wasn't. She engaged in less small talk. She took better notes. She worried more about tests.
SPORTS
January 3, 2001 | J.A. ADANDE
This is good. So good. We're two-thirds of the way there. The more confusion the better, because it just makes the bowl championship series look worse. Miami beat new/old rival Florida, 37-20, Tuesday night in a Sugar Bowl game juiced with so much emotion that even the Hurricane mascot was called for a penalty. If Florida State can knock off unbeaten Oklahoma in tonight's Orange Bowl, the Hurricanes feel they should receive a share of the national championship.
SPORTS
January 2, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are two things missing from Oklahoma's remarkable return to college football prominence: Mugs and thugs. The last time the Sooners played for a national title, in 1987, Coach Barry Switzer's boys were painting the town the color of their jerseys: red. The Sports Illustrated cover shot we recall from that era is an OU quarterback being led away in handcuffs after a cocaine bust.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Federal regulators have shut down all government-funded human medical experiments at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Tulsa amid evidence that researchers there broke multiple rules designed to protect patients, then tried to cover up their lapses by withholding information from university overseers and patients.
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