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University Of Oklahoma

SPORTS
December 30, 2002 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Squinting in the glare of a Southern California afternoon, his team just finished with practice, Oklahoma quarterback Nate Hybl said he doesn't mind playing in the shadows. The senior from Hazlehurst, Ga., ranks as one of the top passers in school history and owns a 19-3 record as a starter over the last two seasons.
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SPORTS
December 28, 2002 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
When defensive linemen and linebackers have an off day, it rarely makes the highlight films. Cornerbacks aren't as fortunate. "With cornerbacks," Andre Woolfolk said, "we're the last ones that people see chasing the guy into the end zone." Woolfolk and his teammates in the Oklahoma secondary suffered that indignity twice this season, when Texas A&M and Oklahoma State connected on long touchdown passes and handed the Sooners their only two defeats.
SPORTS
December 28, 2002 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Returning to Pasadena elicits vivid memories from Oklahoma offensive coordinator Chuck Long, who played in the Rose Bowl twice as a quarterback for Iowa. Long was the starter when the Hawkeyes faced UCLA in the 1986 Rose Bowl, but his favorite story dates to the 1982 game against Washington when he was a young reserve. With Iowa behind, 28-0, late in the fourth quarter, then-coach Hayden Fry turned to the bench and asked the freshman if he wanted to enter the game and get on national television.
BOOKS
October 27, 2002 | Frank Clifford, Frank Clifford is the author of "The Backbone of the World: A Portrait of the Vanishing West Along the Continental Divide." He is an editor at The Times.
The West is an exquisite corpse. "There was nothing to see in the land in the way of a flower," remarked Georgia O'Keeffe when she first saw the high desert of northern New Mexico. "There were just dry white bones." A cow's skull floating in the sky became the painter's most enduring image. But there was nothing ethereal about the boneyard. It was the ruinous outcome of Depression-era drought, made all the more lethal by overstocking and overgrazing an arid land.
SPORTS
April 1, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no more superlatives needed, no more oohs or ahs to render. The talent and the record of the Connecticut Huskies can speak for itself. On Sunday, what many have called the best women's college basketball team ever concluded its season with an 82-70 victory over Oklahoma to take the NCAA tournament championship before 29,619 at the Alamodome. In winning its second title in the last three years, the Huskies equaled the 39-0 single-season record set by Tennessee in 1997-98.
SPORTS
March 31, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something historic will happen here tonight. The undefeated Connecticut Huskies will pounce on Oklahoma as if it were a favorite rawhide chew toy, drag it around for 40 minutes and toss it in the pile with their other 38 victims this season. Then, having won the NCAA tournament, the Huskies will be proclaimed one of the best women's basketball teams ever, maybe the best.
SPORTS
March 30, 2002 | Paul Gutierrez
Indiana vs. Oklahoma At Georgia Dome in Atlanta 3 p.m., channel 2 * STYLE OF PLAY: Oklahoma thrives on rattling opponents with its physical, suffocating defense while talking the most trash of any team in the Final Four. The stingy Sooners are giving up only 64.4 points while getting 9.1 steals a game. Indiana, which began the tournament averaging 70.2 points, prefers to slow things down in the half-court and dump the ball low to silky forward Jared Jeffries.
SPORTS
March 30, 2002 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We'll try to hurry this Indiana-Oklahoma game advance story along so as to make way for the really important game advance story featuring Kansas and Maryland. We'll keep this short and tight and to the point because, while today's Indiana-Oklahoma winner technically moves on to Monday night's national title game, the first of the two national semifinals at the Georgia Dome has sort of a consolation-game feel to it.
SPORTS
March 29, 2002 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oklahoma isn't just OK anymore. The sprawling campus is dripping Ws and dollar signs, an institution of higher football suddenly flush with Final Fours and lavish sports facilities without hash marks. For one week, anyway, basketball talk has nudged aside the relentless speculation on whether Jason White or Nate Hybl will play quarterback and who will replace graduated linebacker Rocky Calmus.
SPORTS
March 23, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Put a basketball in the hands of Stacey Dales and give her a three-on-two fastbreak to lead. Then sit back and watch. The lean, 6-foot blond with pale blue eyes becomes a flash of lightning, bolting her way down the center of the court, glancing at streaking teammates on the wings, gauging who has the best chance to finish off the play. Her pass may bounce through traffic. Or be whipped on a 45-degree angle. It may be lofted toward the rim.
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