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NEWS
May 5, 1989 | From United Press International
Colin S. Diver, a leading scholar in the field of administrative law, has been named dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Diver currently is dean of the Boston University Law School.
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SPORTS
September 12, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
To go from bitter high school rivals to college roommates doesn't happen very often, but it's taking place at the University of Pennsylvania, where freshmen football players Dylan Muscat (Santa Monica High) and Cameron Countryman (Beverly Hills) have suddenly found themselves sharing a microwave, television and refrigerator in their dorm room. "We're trying to get a bean bag," Muscat said of his new friendship with Countryman. For four years of high school they went head to head on opposite sides of the ball.
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NEWS
March 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration accused a University of Pennsylvania researcher of violating safety regulations in a gene therapy experiment in which a patient died. In a stern warning letter, the FDA said that Dr. James M. Wilson of the University of Pennsylvania "violated regulations governing the proper conduct of clinical studies" in a series of gene therapy experiments designed to correct a liver disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Albert M. Kligman, a dermatologist who developed the acne drug Retin-A and the antiwrinkle cream Renova but who may be remembered primarily for a series of experiments on prisoners that led to major reforms in the U.S. medical testing establishment, died Feb. 9 at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. He was 93. Kligman died of a heart attack, according to the University of Pennsylvania, where he had been a faculty member for 50 years. A prolific researcher, Kligman was first to describe the human hair-growth cycle, investigated the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, identified the effects of sunlight on the skin, and coined the terms photoaging and cosmeceuticals.
SPORTS
January 23, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge ruled that Indiana University of Pennsylvania must reinstate its women's gymnastics program and cannot replace it with a women's soccer team. The school said it dropped two women's teams and one men's team to save $350,000.
SPORTS
July 6, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
American hopes of winning the Thames Cup for the first time since 1982 increased when two U.S. eights reached the quarterfinals of the 152-year-old Royal Regatta at Henley-On-Thames, England. Yale University's freshmen heavyweights and the University of Pennsylvania's 'A' crew heavyweights are on course for a semifinal battle today.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Walter H. Annenberg, who sold TV Guide magazine to Rupert Murdoch last year for $3.2 billion, has pledged $10 million to the University of Pennsylvania, it was announced Friday. Sheldon Hackney, president of Annenberg's alma mater, said that the $10 million would go to Penn's history department.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1989
Plaque Honoring Milken Stolen: The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School said it would replace a plaque honoring indicted junk bond financier Michael Milken that was stolen from its alumni "hall of fame." The photograph of the 1979 Wharton graduate, who was indicted in March on 98 counts of racketeering and fraud, was reported missing Tuesday. Campus police said they believe that it was stolen during the weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990
A San Gabriel man who stole rare Benjamin Franklin books from the University of Pennsylvania was sentenced to one year and one day in prison Wednesday in Philadelphia. William Witherell, 39, was convicted in August by a federal judge in a non-jury trial of stealing volumes valued at $60,000 from Penn's Van Pelt Library. One of the volumes stolen was a catalogue of books Franklin sold in 1774 and the other was Franklin's treatise on the English education system.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The University of Pennsylvania dropped disciplinary charges against a student who posted photos on the Web of a naked couple apparently having sex in front of a dorm room window. The junior engineering major had been accused by the Ivy League school of violating its code of student conduct and policies on sexual harassment and use of electronic resources.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2001 | Reuters
In a decision likely to stoke a bragging-rights battle between top U.S. business schools, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School bumped Harvard University from the No. 1 spot on the Financial Times' top 100 masters of business administration programs. Published in Monday's editions, the list differs from those compiled by U.S. News and World Report and Business Week magazines in that it ranks business schools worldwide.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Acknowledging a historic shift in economic and business power to California, the University of Pennsylvania will open a "Wharton West" MBA program in San Francisco next fall to cultivate its share of talent in the high-tech, media and entertainment industries. The Wharton School, the nation's oldest business school and one of the most prestigious, plans to offer continuing education courses next spring to students and business leaders.
NEWS
March 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration accused a University of Pennsylvania researcher of violating safety regulations in a gene therapy experiment in which a patient died. In a stern warning letter, the FDA said that Dr. James M. Wilson of the University of Pennsylvania "violated regulations governing the proper conduct of clinical studies" in a series of gene therapy experiments designed to correct a liver disease.
NEWS
January 22, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration called a halt to human gene therapy research at the University of Pennsylvania on Friday after an investigation into the death in September of an 18-year-old patient found numerous violations by university scientists. The inquiry found serious lapses by the study's principal researchers in reporting potentially serious side effects--seen before the patient died--and in other procedures involving entry criteria and informed consent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As recently as 10 years ago, some archeologists referred to ancient Egypt as the "civilization without cities." Massive pyramids and magnificent temples dotted the barren countryside, but there were few traces of the people who built the pyramids or worshiped in the temples. But that situation is changing rapidly, leading to a much greater understanding of the everyday lives of nonroyal Egyptians.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The University of Pennsylvania dropped disciplinary charges against a student who posted photos on the Web of a naked couple apparently having sex in front of a dorm room window. The junior engineering major had been accused by the Ivy League school of violating its code of student conduct and policies on sexual harassment and use of electronic resources.
SPORTS
January 6, 1994 | DANA HADDAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's mid-December and downtown Philadelphia doesn't look very inviting to Jim Magallanes. Dull gray sky, temperature about 28 degrees--perfect weather to stay inside and study. At times like this, Magallanes--Pennsylvania's All-Ivy League defensive back--daydreams about the Southern California surf. There are no waves in Philly. The people are different. And, of course, so is the weather. Many times over the past four years, Magallanes has wondered whether he picked the right college.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | From The Washington Post
Six months after the University of Pennsylvania charged a white student with racial harassment for calling five black sorority sisters "water buffalo," its new leaders announced Tuesday that they will scrap a controversial code barring racially demeaning speech because it is "not the best solution to the problems of racism in our community." The decision by interim president Claire Faigin and interim provost Marvin Lazerson drew reactions ranging from hope to fury among students at Penn.
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