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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2006 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Tuesday reinstated a massive fraud lawsuit against the University of Phoenix, which, with 180 campuses and more than 310,000 students across the country, is now the nation's largest accredited university. The suit was filed under the federal False Claims Act by two former employees who alleged that school officials violated federal rules barring incentive payments to employees who recruit students to enroll in the college.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Let's hear it for " Frontline," which continues to take on topics for no earthly reason save they're important. In this week's "College Inc.," you won't meet lovely coeds who are stripping to make tuition or nerdy con men amassing small fortunes through pre-fab thesis papers. No, it's all those Universities of Phoenix, whose signs are becoming more ubiquitous than lap-band billboards, and their fellow for-profit colleges that the show's indefatigable correspondent Martin Smith has in his sights.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | JERRY NACHTIGAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There's no football team or basketball team, no drama club, no rows of dormitories filled with boisterous freshmen at the University of Phoenix. With an average age of about 35, most of the university's 32,000 students are too old for competitive sports anyway--and far too busy. They are working professionals who earn undergraduate and advanced degrees primarily in business and management programs through evening and online classes at three dozen branch campuses in 11 states and Puerto Rico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
State oversight of for-profit trade schools, which enroll 400,000 Californians a year, was set to vanish Monday, leaving students whose schools go out of business without access to state-arranged tuition refunds. Republicans in the Assembly rejected a measure Monday afternoon that would have replaced a law that expired at midnight. Disagreements among lawmakers, the schools and consumer advocates have led to a stalemate in the Capitol on this issue for more than three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The nation's largest vocational school chain asked a federal judge here on Monday to dismiss a massive fraud case against it, saying it already had paid the government to settle similar claims.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Apollo Group Inc., operator of the for-profit University of Phoenix, fraudulently misled investors in 2004 about its student recruitment policies, a federal jury decided Wednesday. The panel ordered the company to pay shareholders $280 million. After a two-month trial in federal court in Phoenix, jurors said Apollo officials "knowingly and recklessly" made false statements in a news release, a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission and four conference calls with market analysts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992
Feminist attorney Gloria Allred will address the graduating class of the University of Phoenix's Southern California campus in Fountain Valley at graduation exercises Saturday. The outspoken Allred, who has taken on employment discrimination and women's issues in her law practice, was chosen to speak because of her work in the area of equal rights, said Anthony Digiovanni, vice president and regional director. "We are honored to have her as our 1992 commencement speaker," he said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1992 | Anne Michaud, Free-lance writer
Adult education instructors often struggle with the problem of how to make classes relevant to the needs of business. Especially today, as business and workers adjust to a shifting economy, a work force with the right skills is essential. Anthony Digiovanni, who runs the Southern California division of the University of Phoenix, spoke with free-lance writer Anne Michaud about the changes he perceives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
State oversight of for-profit trade schools, which enroll 400,000 Californians a year, was set to vanish Monday, leaving students whose schools go out of business without access to state-arranged tuition refunds. Republicans in the Assembly rejected a measure Monday afternoon that would have replaced a law that expired at midnight. Disagreements among lawmakers, the schools and consumer advocates have led to a stalemate in the Capitol on this issue for more than three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Let's hear it for " Frontline," which continues to take on topics for no earthly reason save they're important. In this week's "College Inc.," you won't meet lovely coeds who are stripping to make tuition or nerdy con men amassing small fortunes through pre-fab thesis papers. No, it's all those Universities of Phoenix, whose signs are becoming more ubiquitous than lap-band billboards, and their fellow for-profit colleges that the show's indefatigable correspondent Martin Smith has in his sights.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Apollo Group Inc., operator of the for-profit University of Phoenix, fraudulently misled investors in 2004 about its student recruitment policies, a federal jury decided Wednesday. The panel ordered the company to pay shareholders $280 million. After a two-month trial in federal court in Phoenix, jurors said Apollo officials "knowingly and recklessly" made false statements in a news release, a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission and four conference calls with market analysts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Sacramento has rebuffed efforts by the nation's largest for-profit school chain to dismiss a massive fraud case, paving the way for a trial in which the University of Phoenix could be liable for millions of dollars in damages. U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell, in an order released Monday, rejected the university's contention that a $9.8-million settlement it made with the federal government should end the lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The nation's largest vocational school chain asked a federal judge here on Monday to dismiss a massive fraud case against it, saying it already had paid the government to settle similar claims.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rebuffed entreaties from the University of Phoenix to throw out a massive suit charging the nation's largest accredited private university with defrauding the government of millions of dollars in federal education loan funds.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2003 | Allison M. Heinrichs, Times Staff Writer
An innovative spacecraft named Phoenix that resurrects pieces of NASA's failed 1999 Polar Lander and its canceled 2001 Mars Surveyor Lander has won the competition to explore the Red Planet in 2008, NASA announced Monday. The $325-million Phoenix lander is scheduled to be launched in 2007 and should arrive on the icy northern plains of Mars in May 2008.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | JERRY NACHTIGAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There's no football team or basketball team, no drama club, no rows of dormitories filled with boisterous freshmen at the University of Phoenix. With an average age of about 35, most of the university's 32,000 students are too old for competitive sports anyway--and far too busy. They are working professionals who earn undergraduate and advanced degrees primarily in business and management programs through evening and online classes at three dozen branch campuses in 11 states and Puerto Rico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Sacramento has rebuffed efforts by the nation's largest for-profit school chain to dismiss a massive fraud case, paving the way for a trial in which the University of Phoenix could be liable for millions of dollars in damages. U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell, in an order released Monday, rejected the university's contention that a $9.8-million settlement it made with the federal government should end the lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992
Feminist attorney Gloria Allred will address the graduating class of the University of Phoenix's Southern California campus in Fountain Valley at graduation exercises Saturday. The outspoken Allred, who has taken on employment discrimination and women's issues in her law practice, was chosen to speak because of her work in the area of equal rights, said Anthony Digiovanni, vice president and regional director. "We are honored to have her as our 1992 commencement speaker," he said.
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