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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1990
Members of the University of California Regents meeting in Westwood on Thursday gave preliminary approval to UC San Francisco Medical Center to acquire the financially troubled Mt. Zion Medical Center. Three regents' committees, after a lengthy debate, also endorsed issuing more than $40 million in revenue bonds for construction, property purchases and paying off the nonprofit hospital's current debt of about $11 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1990
Members of the University of California Regents meeting in Westwood on Thursday gave preliminary approval to UC San Francisco Medical Center to acquire the financially troubled Mt. Zion Medical Center. Three regents' committees, after a lengthy debate, also endorsed issuing more than $40 million in revenue bonds for construction, property purchases and paying off the nonprofit hospital's current debt of about $11 million.
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NEWS
October 28, 1988 | United Press International
The second of five people who ate poison "death cup" mushrooms during a dinner party with family and friends underwent liver transplant surgery today at the Portland Veterans Administration Hospital. The operation on Isun Pak, 52, began shortly after 9 a.m., a hospital spokesman said.
NEWS
December 18, 1985
Laboratory studies have confirmed that the use of condoms can prevent the sexual transmission of the AIDS virus, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center announced Tuesday. Public health officials long have recommended the use of condoms as a "safe-sex" practice. But until now, the scientific basis for that recommendation had not been established. At a press conference in San Francisco, Dr. Marcus A.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Mendocino County girl who almost died from kidney failure caused by an E. coli infection in August is expected to make a full recovery. Six-year-old Michaela, whose family requested that her last name not be used, began school on time last month, is taking dancing lessons again and gets better every day, relatives said. Nobody knows how the Hopland girl got the E. coli infection, although it generally comes from eating undercooked ground meat. She first showed symptoms on Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999
Many California doctors are missing an opportunity to find victims of domestic violence by failing to ask all their patients during routine office visits about abuse, according to a study released Tuesday. About 10% of the 400 primary care physicians surveyed said they would inquire about abuse during routine office exams, such as checkups or prenatal visits. By comparison, 79% said they would ask if a patient showed signs of injury.
SPORTS
January 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ted Williams, slowed by a series of strokes and congestive heart failure in recent years, was back in a Gainesville, Fla., hospital Thursday with a high temperature and low blood pressure. The 83-year-old baseball Hall of Famer was taken from his home by ambulance to Shands Hospital at the University of Florida, about 50 miles away. He had open-heart surgery last January.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
When a cancer patient undergoing radiation treatment complained of pain at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center last April, a doctor promptly concluded that part of the problem was the position in her cervix of a radioactive capsule used to kill a tumor. The physician, a radiation oncology resident, immediately set about to remove the device.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | LLOYD G. CARTER, United Press International
Despite a recurrence of cancer, medical consumer advocate Paula Carroll is about to launch, between chemotherapy sessions, a letter-writing campaign in her crusade to drive bad doctors out of business. "It makes me more determined than ever that we have to seek reforms within the medical profession," Carroll says of her medical setback. "It has not daunted my fervor or enthusiasm one bit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1986 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
Soon after a Valencia woman checked into Northridge Hospital Medical Center suffering labor pains and contractions in the sixth month of her pregnancy, she and her husband were faced with a difficult decision. Doctors said the twins she was carrying were dying because their blood vessels had mingled. One fetus was dangerously swollen and the other withering. The couple, Patricia and Randy Moller, were told that they could wait until one fetus died, then the second could be delivered.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For every American who dies of AIDS, the federal government spends about $79,000 to stop the disease. For everyone who dies of stroke, it spends $600. Of course, those are not the only differences between the two diseases. AIDS is new, catching and strikes the young. Stroke is none of those.
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