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SPORTS
October 4, 1988
Dick Bestwick resigned as athletic director of the University of South Carolina, citing unspecified health problems. Albert (King) Dixon Jr., associate vice president for alumni affairs, has been appointed interim athletic director.
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BOOKS
January 1, 2006 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries" by Margaret Millar.
THE author known as Ross Macdonald -- real name, Kenneth Millar (1915-83) -- worked hard for what he achieved, and what he achieved, in a 30-year career that took him from obscurity to the cover of Newsweek, was remarkable. Recognized by critics as the successor to Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler and a culminating figure in the American hard-boiled tradition, he was also viewed as a peer by such mainstream literary writers as Reynolds Price, Elizabeth Bowen, Thomas Berger and Eudora Welty.
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SPORTS
September 2, 2005 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
Steve Spurrier returned to college Thursday night and wasted little time in providing South Carolina football the two things it needed most: hope and the forward pass. After that, it got more complicated -- and more mixed-bagged realistic. South Carolina's 24-15 win over Central Florida at Williams-Brice Stadium in front of 82,753 amounted to a final score and a fresh start for a coach on the rebound and a program battling a 112-year pigskin slump.
SPORTS
February 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The University of South Carolina was notified in writing by the NCAA that the school is no longer on probation. The probation dated to 1987, when the men's program was first placed on two year's probation because of rule violations under former coach Bill Foster. The NCAA extended the probation by six months last July in the wake of the school's so-called steroid scandal.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
"The USC" is painted in bold letters on a huge smokestack towering over the 242-acre University of South Carolina campus. Why The USC ? "Because we are The USC," replied Greg Henkel, a 20-year-old junior who was in the school's book store buying a The USC cap and a The USC T-shirt. "The University of South Carolina was founded in 1801. It was the only major university in America with the initials USC for years.
SPORTS
April 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tony Stewart has gotten many lectures during his time in Nextel Cup. Giving them? Now, that's something new for the former NASCAR champion. "All right everybody, straighten up," Stewart, a grin on his face, told the 30 students as he began his guest professorship Tuesday in NASCAR Marketing at the University of South Carolina. Stewart's time in NASCAR has been marked by skilled driving and a hair-trigger temper.
BOOKS
February 29, 2004 | Lee Siegel, Lee Siegel is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"The Temper of the West" is the vivid, idiosyncratic autobiography of William Jovanovich, who ran the publishing house of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich for 36 years until his departure in 1990, dying 11 years later at the age of 81. Jovanovich entered book publishing in 1947, at a time, he writes, when the heads of houses liked to call themselves "publishers" rather than chairmen or presidents.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY
One dull gray morning in Manhattan in the 1930s, ThomasWolfe left his tiny 1st Avenue apartment to head downtown, sharing the elevator with a woman and her unruly German shepherd. The dog kept straining at him until her grip broke, then leaped up and planted his paws flat on the chest of the tall and disheveled 6-foot, 6-inch writer with piercing eyes, a sudden celebrity then being assailed all over New York for his notorious first novel, 1929's "Look Homeward, Angel." "Wolfe!
BOOKS
November 8, 1998 | MARY LEFKOWITZ, Mary Lefkowitz, the Andrew W. Mellon professor in the humanities at Wellesley College, is the author of "Not Out of Africa."
Don't look now, but your next-door neighbors may be witches. The probability is higher if you live in California or its antithesis, Massachusetts. How can you tell? Look for someone who is middle-class, white, well-educated and a responsible citizen, either straight or gay. Sound unremarkable? In many respects, so is the kind of witchcraft that these witches practice. They convene at established times in houses of worship set up primarily in their own homes.
BOOKS
January 19, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, John Balzar is a national correspondent for The Times and contributing writer for Book Review
All these years later, only fragments are left to discover: the pocket lint, the letters and cables and scrawls of handwriting on hotel letterheads. Ernest Hemingway has been gone 35 years. F. Scott Fitzgerald would have been 100 last year. Their editor, Maxwell Perkins, died in New York on June 17, 1947. We can be pretty sure none of them would have deemed this new batch of Lost Generation books worth publishing, and in Hemingway's case, he expressly instructed that his letters not be. But these men strove for greatness, and they achieved it at a propitious time in the history of American literature.
SPORTS
November 2, 1996
Kendra Meano, a left fielder and designated hitter for the Mater Dei softball team, has made an oral commitment to play at South Carolina next year. Meano batted .462 for the Division I-champion Monarchs her junior year. * Jenn Brown, a catcher at Sonora, has made an oral commitment to attend Florida State next year to play softball. Brown, a two-time all-Freeway League selection, batted .260 last year for the Raiders.
SPORTS
February 20, 1990
The University of South Carolina uncovered six instances of possible rule violations and found "widespread experimentation" by football players with steroids from 1983 to 1987, according to the school's report to the NCAA on steroid use. The five-volume report obtained by Associated Press under the state's Freedom of Information Act found that at least two coaches paid for the muscle-building drugs for players on four occasions.
SPORTS
January 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
South Carolina waited six decades for a victory like this. And first-year Gamecock Coach Brad Scott delivered it. South Carolina, 0-8 in previous postseason appearances, finally won its first bowl game Monday, defeating West Virginia, 24-21, in the Carquest Bowl. Steve Taneyhill, who completed 62.9% of his passes during the regular season, completed 26 of 36 for 227 yards, including a two-yard touchdown pass to tight end Boomer Foster.
SPORTS
April 3, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
South Carolina, jilted by Georgia Tech Coach Bobby Cremins, will get Vanderbilt's Eddie Fogler, sources told the Associated Press on Friday. Sources said Fogler, the AP coach of the year, has decided to accept an offer to coach the Gamecocks. "It's a done deal," one source close to the university said. "I think we've got a great coach and he's going to do well," another source close to the selection process told the AP. "To have the coach of the year, he would be hard to beat."
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