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University Of Southern California Medical School

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NEWS
September 21, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before you get to the room with the eyeballs, there's nothing too intimidating about the laboratory in which Keith Del Villar works. On the third floor of McKibben Annex at the USC Medical School, it seems, at least to the layperson, a pretty standard scientist's lair. Shelves of beakers and bottles and test tubes, droppers and slides and laboratory film, rubber gloves and stacks of paper threatening to spill over.
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NEWS
September 21, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before you get to the room with the eyeballs, there's nothing too intimidating about the laboratory in which Keith Del Villar works. On the third floor of McKibben Annex at the USC Medical School, it seems, at least to the layperson, a pretty standard scientist's lair. Shelves of beakers and bottles and test tubes, droppers and slides and laboratory film, rubber gloves and stacks of paper threatening to spill over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1987
Edmund L. Sherwood, a retired general surgeon from Toluca Lake, died Thursday at his home after suffering from cancer. He was 64. Sherwood, a graduate of the University of Southern California Medical School, taught in the surgical training program at County-USC Medical Center from 1967 to 1975. He belonged to the medical school's Society of Graduate Surgeons, an organization composed of physicians who complete residency there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of corneas harvested from bodies at the Los Angeles County coroner's office dropped nearly 70% last month under a new policy that requires death investigators to contact family members for permission before removing the eye tissue, statistics released Tuesday show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | ALEXANDER MORGAN CAPRON, Alexander Morgan Capron is university professor of law and medicine and co-director of the Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics at USC
What does the modern physician need to get a better handle on? The latest in diagnostic technology and pharmaceutical magic? No. According to a blue ribbon panel that has spent the past 10 months laying the groundwork for sweeping curricular changes at the University of California's five academic health centers, what the modern physician needs is more business skills and knowledge of economics. It is too soon to tell how the leaders of the UC medical schools will respond.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1985 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, nearly as reclusive as its billionaire founder was in his final years, is about to become to medical research what the J. Paul Getty Museum is to the world art community as a result of the planned sale of Hughes Aircraft to General Motors.
OPINION
June 2, 1991 | Al Meyerhoff and Lawrie Mott, Al Meyerhoff is a senior attorney and Lawrie Mott is a senior scientist with the San Francisco office of the Natural Resources Defense Council
Anyone in your neighborhood or ours who saw children in danger would go to their aid. The need to help is instinctive. But there are invisible dangers in a child's world, too. To fail to respond to those hazards is an unwitting form of environmental child abuse. Consider these forms of abuse: --Widespread air pollution has reduced the lung capacity of children in Los Angeles to, on average, 10% to 15% less than children who live in less polluted areas.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | JOAN KIRCHNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a teen-ager, Lesley Stanfield breezed through chemotherapy and survived a risky bone marrow transplant without a thought of dying. Now, at 21, Stanfield is filled with anxiety about possible side effects from her treatment for stomach cancer years ago. Her heart remains weak and she firmly believes the rest of her body will break down in time. She frantically fills every minute of her day, believing she must live to the fullest while she is still healthy.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The locale was a 400-bed hospital by the sunny Adriatic seaside where, in more peaceful times, bemedaled pensioners from the Yugoslav army used to fret over their hearts or livers. Ivica Trogrlic was a different kind of casualty, in a different Croatia. Lying anesthetized on the operating table, the brown-haired, sallow-skinned 22-year-old had had his left upper arm shredded by shrapnel while fighting the Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina's civil war.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Physical examinations should be like fingerprints: no two alike. While we all come with the same basic equipment, individually we have specific needs. Yet, most of us have been indoctrinated to the assembly-line approach to the annual physical. "The idea of a complete annual physical exam is a 20th century U.S. phenomenon that no other country does," says Dr. Al Berg, a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and professor at the University of Washington in Seattle.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY, Times Staff Writer
The essence of Collagen Corp. is flesh and bone. From a sticky glop that is among the most common materials in animal and human tissue, the Palo Alto company has concocted a unique product. It makes a goo of natural proteins called collagens that it extracts from cowhide and modifies for human use. It then sells the stuff to doctors, who inject it under patients' skin to smooth wrinkles and scars or to rebuild tissue during plastic surgery.
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