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University Of Southern California School Of Cinema Television

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film school can wait. Officials at USC's School of Cinema-Television say they have decided to defer the scholarship prize for a Ventura County juvenile inmate's winning anti-drug video until after she is released next spring.
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NEWS
February 26, 2004 | Susan King
Officials from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Wednesday that they are throwing the USC School of Cinema-Television a big party this fall for its 75th anniversary. The school was established at the suggestion of the academy in 1929. The USC School of Cinema-Television also announced the formal launch of a $75-million endowment initiative, the largest of its kind ever undertaken by a university film school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Sometimes the people who've been around, stick around . . . loved, honored and listened to. At 76, Howard Koch is still producing movies and in his mid-70s Ray Stark is doing the same with his Rastar Productions. Walter Cronkite doubles as TV wise man in times of crisis. And George Burns is still doing stand-up. Even in the youth-tilt of show business, experience is occasionally valued and productivity for some can endure for the long term.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998 | Karen Kaplan
Academy Award-winning director Robert Zemeckis has donated $5 million to USC's School of Cinema-Television toward the creation of a digital arts studio. The $15-million facility, the school's first new building since 1984, will introduce students to high-tech production techniques that are increasingly vital in Hollywood, said Dean Elizabeth Daley.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Mark D. Pesce, co-inventor of the virtual reality modeling language, has been named director of the USC School of Cinema-Television's interactive media program. "We'll be exploring the convergence of entertainment and technology," Pesce said. "We expect that graduates of this program will generate the best of the next generation of interactive works."
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | PETER BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Peter Bennett is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
If you're looking for an unedited and uncensored look at Hollywood movie-making, where a quiet kid from Indiana may be a 16-millimeter film away from becoming the next Steven Spielberg, drop by USC's School of Cinema-Television for a one-hour tour any Friday afternoon. There are no tickets to buy, lines to wait in or trams to whisk you past shaking buildings, towering infernos and parting Red Seas. What you get is no-nonsense talk on the state of the art and the state of the filmmaker's mind.
NEWS
February 26, 2004 | Susan King
Officials from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Wednesday that they are throwing the USC School of Cinema-Television a big party this fall for its 75th anniversary. The school was established at the suggestion of the academy in 1929. The USC School of Cinema-Television also announced the formal launch of a $75-million endowment initiative, the largest of its kind ever undertaken by a university film school.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998 | Karen Kaplan
Academy Award-winning director Robert Zemeckis has donated $5 million to USC's School of Cinema-Television toward the creation of a digital arts studio. The $15-million facility, the school's first new building since 1984, will introduce students to high-tech production techniques that are increasingly vital in Hollywood, said Dean Elizabeth Daley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1988 | Compiled by Connie Benesch
Facts and figures from four major film and TV schools. The alumni lists are illustrative only, and don't include all working alumni or screen credits associated with each school. Key: d--denotes director, w--writer and p--producer. Columbia University School of the Arts, film division. Established: 1965. (First film course offered in 1916.) Enrollment: 150 graduate students. Administrators: Richard Brick and Milos Forman, film division co-chairmen; Peter Smith, School of the Arts dean.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Mark D. Pesce, co-inventor of the virtual reality modeling language, has been named director of the USC School of Cinema-Television's interactive media program. "We'll be exploring the convergence of entertainment and technology," Pesce said. "We expect that graduates of this program will generate the best of the next generation of interactive works."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film school can wait. Officials at USC's School of Cinema-Television say they have decided to defer the scholarship prize for a Ventura County juvenile inmate's winning anti-drug video until after she is released next spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Sometimes the people who've been around, stick around . . . loved, honored and listened to. At 76, Howard Koch is still producing movies and in his mid-70s Ray Stark is doing the same with his Rastar Productions. Walter Cronkite doubles as TV wise man in times of crisis. And George Burns is still doing stand-up. Even in the youth-tilt of show business, experience is occasionally valued and productivity for some can endure for the long term.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | PETER BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Peter Bennett is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
If you're looking for an unedited and uncensored look at Hollywood movie-making, where a quiet kid from Indiana may be a 16-millimeter film away from becoming the next Steven Spielberg, drop by USC's School of Cinema-Television for a one-hour tour any Friday afternoon. There are no tickets to buy, lines to wait in or trams to whisk you past shaking buildings, towering infernos and parting Red Seas. What you get is no-nonsense talk on the state of the art and the state of the filmmaker's mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
George Lucas, the filmmaker who gave the world light sabers, the Force, Wookiees and THX sound, was selected Friday by the American Film Institute's Board of Trustees to receive its 33rd annual Life Achievement Award, its highest honor for a career in film.
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