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University Of Southern California School Of Music

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February 17, 2006 | Chris Pasles
USC trustee Flora L. Thornton, for whom the university's Thornton School of Music was named, has donated $5 million to kick-start a campaign aimed at the creation of a new music building on the campus. The projected cost of the building is $70 million. USC hopes it will open in 2010. In 1999, Thornton gave the university $25 million, the largest donation at that time to a school of music in the United States, and it was at that time that the university renamed the school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2006 | Chris Pasles
USC trustee Flora L. Thornton, for whom the university's Thornton School of Music was named, has donated $5 million to kick-start a campaign aimed at the creation of a new music building on the campus. The projected cost of the building is $70 million. USC hopes it will open in 2010. In 1999, Thornton gave the university $25 million, the largest donation at that time to a school of music in the United States, and it was at that time that the university renamed the school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As a young woman during the Depression, Flora Laney Thornton loved to sing. Full of pluck at age 22, she left the Methodist Church choir in Fort Worth for New York, where she sang in two Broadway musicals. Then she married a boy from back home, Charles B. "Tex" Thornton. For the next 41 years, she was the dutiful wife of the corporate visionary who co-founded Litton Industries. "Music," she said, "was not on the docket in my marriage."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As a young woman during the Depression, Flora Laney Thornton loved to sing. Full of pluck at age 22, she left the Methodist Church choir in Fort Worth for New York, where she sang in two Broadway musicals. Then she married a boy from back home, Charles B. "Tex" Thornton. For the next 41 years, she was the dutiful wife of the corporate visionary who co-founded Litton Industries. "Music," she said, "was not on the docket in my marriage."
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