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University Of The Incarnate Word

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NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A private Catholic university in Texas has agreed to pay $2.4 million to settle a federal lawsuit involving Latino housekeepers who contended that they were ordered to speak only English, were called "dumb Mexicans" and were physically abused by their supervisor. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission represented the 18 former housekeepers in the suit against the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio.
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NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A private Catholic university in Texas has agreed to pay $2.4 million to settle a federal lawsuit involving Latino housekeepers who contended that they were ordered to speak only English, were called "dumb Mexicans" and were physically abused by their supervisor. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission represented the 18 former housekeepers in the suit against the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio.
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NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A traffic stop that turned deadly for an honor student at a Roman Catholic university near San Antonio continues to roil officials who have promised to investigate the incident. Robert Cameron Redus, 23, a student at the University of the Incarnate Word, was shot five times during a confrontation last Friday with Christopher Carter, an officer with university's police force. The incident took place a few blocks off campus. “Our family does not believe the officer's report,” the family wrote in a statement that was sent to the San Antonio Express-News and other media outlets Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Retired Brig. Gen. Robert F. McDermott, a former Air Force Academy dean who went on to become chairman of the insurance giant USAA and a leading advocate for auto safety, died Monday. He was 86. McDermott, who also led a group that owned the San Antonio Spurs for a time in the 1990s, died at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after suffering a stroke two weeks ago, family spokesman Paul Ringenbach said. Often called "McD" or "the General," McDermott had been awaiting his fifth pacemaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | YVETTE C. DOSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A small boy, a young cadet in the Mexican army, is said to have wrapped himself in the Mexican flag as he leaped to his death from the top of Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City during the last stand of the U.S.-Mexican war in 1847. He, along with five other young "nin~os heroes"--or "child heroes," as they are now known in Mexico--flung themselves off the castle during the battle, joining the tens of thousands of Mexican soldiers who died fighting U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013
Charles Vest President of MIT oversaw expansion Charles Vest, 72, who as president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology oversaw a vast expansion of the institution and inaugurated an unprecedented program of free online education, died Thursday at home in the Washington, D.C., area, according to the university. The cause was pancreatic cancer. Vest was president of MIT from 1990 to 2004, and served on several high-level panels outside the university, including a State Department group that concluded in a 2005 report that the U.S. intelligence community was "dead wrong" in almost all its pre-Iraq war judgments about that country's supposed weapons of mass destruction.
SPORTS
September 15, 1998 | TIM KAWAKAMI, Times Staff Writer
TOM LASORDA, manager. What he's doing now: interim general manager, Dodgers. Memory: "You know who I had out there in the last game of the World Series? Hershiser, Dempsey, Stubbs, Sax, Griffin, Hamilton, Hatcher in left, Shelby and Danny Heep in right. . . . [Before Game 4], I wasn't going to have a meeting that night. But then [Bill] Russell came over and told me that Mike Marshall couldn't play. And that really burned me up. So I had a meeting and did a little screaming and hollering.
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