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University Of The People

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
While Jennifer Clay was at home taking an online exam for her business law class, a proctor a few hundred miles away was watching her every move. Using a webcam mounted in Clay's Los Angeles apartment, the monitor in Phoenix tracked how frequently her eyes shifted from the computer screen and listened for the telltale sounds of a possible helper in the room. Her computer browser was locked - remotely - to prevent Internet searches, and her typing pattern was analyzed to make sure she was who she said she was: Did she enter her password with the same rhythm as she had in the past?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Faculty members at San Diego State University should make an extra effort to keep minority students in school and should renew their commitment to training future teachers, SDSU President Thomas Day said Monday. Delivering his annual President's Address to about 200 of the faculty, Day said SDSU must take action to increase the number of minority students it attracts and retains if it is to reflect the racial makeup of the area. "We must remain in tune with our region and nation," Day said.
OPINION
January 22, 2003
Re "Bush Shows Leadership in Race Issue," Commentary, Jan. 19: I am incensed by the comments of Ward Connerly. What nerve he has to invoke the names of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. in his attempt to link them with President Bush. Does he think all of us are crazy? As a black man, I am disgusted. Connerly is an embarrassment to our race. Nine out of 10 black people do not agree with his views of affirmative action. The first President Bush gave us Justice Clarence Thomas, and former Gov. Pete Wilson gave us Connerly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
It won't have professors, not in a traditional sense. And no tuition either. Still, the University of the People, a Pasadena-based venture envisioned as the first global, online, peer-to-peer university, will be a real institution of higher education, its founder says. Shai Reshef, the Israeli entrepreneur behind the idea, said the response has been overwhelming since news of his in-the-works university started spreading earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
On the eve of its first American tour, which began July 22 in Michigan, the Junge Deutsche Philharmonie suddenly found itself without a music director. Gerd Albrecht had been taken ill. A representative from the German youth ensemble made a call to Israeli conductor Yoav Talmi, who readily agreed to come to the rescue, even though he was beginning a vacation after completing his first season with the Israel Chamber Orchestra.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
An adult male sperm whale can outweigh 10 elephants and would be able to see over a six-story building if it stood on its tail. Its massive forehead contains an exceedingly fine oil, mistaken by early whalers as sperm, that was once used to lubricate Soviet space vehicles. The sperm whale, relentlessly hunted in the 19th Century for its oil, still roams all of Earth's oceans, its numbers now estimated at 1 million. But little is known about the behavior of these strange, elusive animals--which can dive more than 2 miles: how distant tribes relate to each other, or the purpose of the peculiar clicking sounds they make.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of former law enforcement officials, politicians and celebrities called Thursday for a grand jury investigation into alleged "willful and corrupt misconduct" by the Los Angeles Police Department in the handling of the investigation of Robert F. Kennedy's assassination. The group is led by Paul Schrade, a former Kennedy aide who was wounded in the kitchen of Los Angeles' Ambassador Hotel June 5, 1968, when Kennedy was shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2008 | avid Sarno
JUST AS every corner of the connected world benefits from the Web's power to eliminate time and distance as obstacles to spread information, no place is safe from its equal and opposite power to spread misinformation. Wall Street, perhaps more than any other industrial nerve center, sits astride this fault line. The financial sector has an endless thirst for hypercurrent news, but it also gulps down plenty of impurities. There was the case last month of the 6-year-old Chicago Tribune news article announcing United Airlines' bankruptcy on the South Florida Sun Sentinel's website (the two papers, like the Los Angeles Times, are owned by Tribune Co)
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | LARRY GREEN and TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The biggest, most expensive municipal library building in America--a $175-million, block-square, 10-story bibliophiles' palace--will open in Chicago late next year with just one flaw: Books will be in short supply. Moreover, this city's 88 branch libraries, many of them little more than storefronts, have other serious problems. Among them are "dilapidated facilities, damaged and stolen collections and too few personnel," according to a report of the Chicago Public Library Foundation.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | TIM BOVEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government's flagship program for minority entrepreneurs awarded $19 billion in contracts over the last six years, with the lion's share going to firms whose headquarters were located in primarily white, well-to-do neighborhoods. An Associated Press computer analysis of "minority set-aside" contracts handled by the Small Business Administration found that just 22% of the project dollars went to companies located in minority areas.
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