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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988
A whole Torah, about 250 feet of hand-scribed parchment, will be unrolled in an unusual Torah dedication ceremony this morning at University Synagogue in Irvine. The 20-year-old English Torah will be presented by Suzanne and Robert Butnik of Irvine, members of the 2-year-old Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation congregation, and Bernard and Elly Butnik of Long Beach. A Torah is the first five books of the Old Testament written in scroll form on parchment.
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MAGAZINE
October 23, 2005 | Deborah Netburn, Deborah Netburn last wrote for the magazine about Allan Heinberg, a TV writer-turned-comic book author.
"In the same way that you plan for a concert or theater series or for family time, we want you to plan to be with us," said Rabbi Arnie Rachlis, launching a new monthly program at the University Synagogue in Irvine with a sermon titled "Synaplex: Opening Soon in a Shul Near You (Ours!)." Standing behind a different lectern, this one in Beverly Hills, Rabbi Laura Geller launched the same program at Temple Emanuel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003
RE Mary McNamara's article on Brentwood ("90049 Is the Recall's Hip ZIP," Aug 5): Brentwood is also known as a neighborhood of wonderful religious congregations, among them St. Martin of Tours, Brentwood Presbyterian Church and University Synagogue. And inside each spiritual home are Brentwood's citizens trying to make a better world, in their own way. Rabbi Morley T. Feinstein University Synagogue Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003
RE Mary McNamara's article on Brentwood ("90049 Is the Recall's Hip ZIP," Aug 5): Brentwood is also known as a neighborhood of wonderful religious congregations, among them St. Martin of Tours, Brentwood Presbyterian Church and University Synagogue. And inside each spiritual home are Brentwood's citizens trying to make a better world, in their own way. Rabbi Morley T. Feinstein University Synagogue Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1999 | ELAINE GALE
University Synagogue will mark "Kristallnacht" or "The Night of Broken Glass" at Shabbat services beginning at 8 p.m. Friday. Kristallnacht was the first major event of the Holocaust, and the service will honor all survivors and veterans. Guest speaker Irene Opdyke, a Christian, will discuss how she helped persecuted Jews during the Holocaust and sign copies of her book, "In My Hands: Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer." The synagogue is at 4915 Alton Pkwy., Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Jewish congregation's attempt to buy the failing Irvine Ice Arena and transform it into a synagogue has escalated into an emotional battle, with protesters picketing before Friday night services and accusations of anti-Semitism. "Religion and kids recreation--those are probably the most sensitive things you can think about," said Steve Coonan, who with his wife, Linda, operates the ice rink at Michelson Drive and Harvard Avenue near UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL
In a less affluent time and a less affluent place, it would be huge news: Henry and Susan Samueli, the Broadcom billionaires, give $1 million to University Synagogue in Irvine for its new temple. But the gift arrived quietly last fall during the High Holy Days and stayed a semi-secret, not spreading much beyond the synagogue's congregation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operators of the Irvine Ice Arena, who have fought the sale of the property for a future synagogue, have filed for bankruptcy. In addition, the owners of the land have filed two lawsuits against the rink operators, one to evict them and the other seeking about $450,000 in back rent. But the action does not necessarily put an end to ice skating in Irvine. The City Council last Wednesday voted to establish a task force to search for land to build an ice rink or other sports facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL
In a less affluent time and a less affluent place, it would be huge news: Henry and Susan Samueli, the Broadcom billionaires, give $1 million to University Synagogue in Irvine for its new temple. But the gift arrived quietly last fall during the High Holy Days and stayed a semi-secret, not spreading much beyond the synagogue's congregation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Twelve years ago, the Irvine United Church of Christ opened its doors--and its arms--to a small Jewish congregation in search of a home. On Sunday, the church embraced followers of another faith--Islam--perhaps marking the first time in the United States that Christians, Jews and Muslims have worshiped under one roof. During the Sunday morning service, the Rev. Fred C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operators of the Irvine Ice Arena, who have fought the sale of the property for a future synagogue, have filed for bankruptcy. In addition, the owners of the land have filed two lawsuits against the rink operators, one to evict them and the other seeking about $450,000 in back rent. But the action does not necessarily put an end to ice skating in Irvine. The City Council last Wednesday voted to establish a task force to search for land to build an ice rink or other sports facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Jewish congregation's attempt to buy the failing Irvine Ice Arena and transform it into a synagogue has escalated into an emotional battle, with protesters picketing before Friday night services and accusations of anti-Semitism. "Religion and kids recreation--those are probably the most sensitive things you can think about," said Steve Coonan, who with his wife, Linda, operates the ice rink at Michelson Drive and Harvard Avenue near UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celebrating an ancient ceremony in a modern way, many Jewish families in Orange County and beyond are personalizing the ritual text read for Passover, which begins at sundown tonight. Most rituals of the Passover Seder--a meal including symbolic foods such as bitter herbs, matzo, paschal lamb and kosher wine--have been unchanged for centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1999 | ELAINE GALE
University Synagogue will mark "Kristallnacht" or "The Night of Broken Glass" at Shabbat services beginning at 8 p.m. Friday. Kristallnacht was the first major event of the Holocaust, and the service will honor all survivors and veterans. Guest speaker Irene Opdyke, a Christian, will discuss how she helped persecuted Jews during the Holocaust and sign copies of her book, "In My Hands: Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer." The synagogue is at 4915 Alton Pkwy., Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Twelve years ago, the Irvine United Church of Christ opened its doors--and its arms--to a small Jewish congregation in search of a home. On Sunday, the church embraced followers of another faith--Islam--perhaps marking the first time in the United States that Christians, Jews and Muslims have worshiped under one roof. During the Sunday morning service, the Rev. Fred C.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1991 | RANDYE HODER
The congregants at University Synagogue are repeatedly told that it is not enough to come to temple. It is not enough to pray. It is not enough to study the Torah. It is not enough to send their children to religious school. Whatever they are doing, it is simply not enough. They must, says Rabbi Allen Freehling, the Brentwood synagogue's spiritual leader, reach beyond the walls of the temple, beyond the Jewish community and into the world at large.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | NONA YATES
Synagogues throughout Southern California will celebrate Shavuot next week, a holiday that marks the giving of the Torah to Moses and the Jewish people at Mt. Sinai. Shavuot will begin at sundown Thursday. Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks, comes exactly seven weeks after Passover. It was known as an agricultural holiday in biblical times and was sometimes called the Feast of First Fruits.
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